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Flashcards in Practice Test 4 Problems Deck (13):
1

The passage as a whole characterizes Babbitt
as
(A) immoral and sneaky
(B) hardworking but superficial
(C) light-hearted and whimsical
(D) intellectual but underappreciated
(E) inconsistent and mercurial

One of Babbitt's virtues as a real-estate broker (line 9) is said to be his diligence (line 13) or hard work. THe passage also discusses the superficiality of Babbitt's knowledge in lines 20-27, the superficiality of his morality in lines 29-38, and the superficiality of his civic concern in the final paragraph.

2

MATH- SOLVING EQUATIONS
A certain number, b, is quadrupled. The
result is then subtracted from three times
the number, p. What is the result if that
difference is subtracted from y?
(A) y þ 3p þ 4b
(B) y þ 3p 2 4b
(C) y 2 3p 2 4b
(D) y 2 3p þ 4b
(E) 3p 2 4b 2 y

D. When b is quadrupled, it becomes 4b. Three times the value of p is 3p. WHen 4b is subtracted from 3p, te difference is (3p-4b) When that difference is subtracted from y, the result is:
y- (3p-4b)
DISTRIBUTE y-3p+4p
CHapter 9 Lesson 1 SOLVING EQUATIONS

3

MATH: Triangles
The three sides of a triangle have lengths of 6,
10, and w. Which of the following could be
the area of the triangle?
I. 12
II. 30
III. 45
(A) I only
(B) II only
(C) I and II only
(D) II and III only
(E) I, II, and III

C. Consider the side of length 6 to be the base, and "attach" the side of length 12. Notice that the traingle has the greatest possible height when the to sides form a right angle. Therefore, the greatest possible area of such a triangle is 1/2(6)(10)=30 and the minimum possible area is 0 Roman numerals I and II are possible,
Chapter 11 Lesson 2 Triangles

4

For the blind, ---- is of heightened improtance since their sense of smell provides them with distinct impressions of their surrounding environment.

(A) olfaction
(B) abstinence
(C) pungency
(D) gustation
(E) mastication

A Those who are blind rely on their sense of
smell [to provide] them with ... impressions of their
surrounding environment. The word should be one
that describes the sense of smell. olfaction ¼ sense
of smell; abstinence ¼ the act of refraining from
activity; pungent ¼ sharp taste or odor; gustation ¼
sense of taste; mastication ¼ chewing

5

Passage 2
Primitive man lived in a world of fear. He
reacted to most natural phenomena such as
weather events based on that fear.
He eventually attributed many life events to
55 his instinctive knowledge of a higher being or
power. In his primitive mind, life and death
events were the acts of spirits. Since he was not
able to see or sense these spirits, he lived in a
world of terror.
60 In an effort to enact some type of truce with
these “gods” or “spirits,” man devised charms,
ceremonies and rituals to placate these spirits.
Although we may find ancient burial
customs to be strange or in some cases
65 repugnant, they obviously arose for a reason.
The first burial customs, then, were crude
efforts to protect the living from the spirits
which caused the death of the person. Fear of
the dead caused the burning of bodies to
70 destroy evil spirits.
Many primitive tribes even today simply run
away from their dead, leaving them to rot.
Zoroastrians similarly allow their dead to
simply rot or be devoured by vultures. They
75 consider fire to be too sacred to be put to use
disposing of the dead, and burial is thought to
be a defilement and injury to mother earth.
Others place the body deep in the jungle to
be devoured by wild beasts. In Tibet and among
80 the Kamchatkan Indians, dogs are used for this
purpose because they believe that those eaten
by dogs will be better off in the other world.
Herodotus tells us that the Calatians ate
their own dead. It was considered a sacred
85 honor and duty of the family. Queen Artemisia
supposedly mixed the ashes of her beloved with
wine and drank it. To this day, certain African
tribes are known to grind the bones of their
dead and mingle them with their food.
90 The Zulus burn all of the belongings of the
deceased to prevent the evil spirits from even
hovering in the vicinity. Some tribes would set
up a ring of fire around the bodies of their dead
to singe the wings of the spirits and prevent
95 them from attacking other members of the
community. Other tribes would throw spears
and arrows into the air to kill hovering spirits or
would eat bitter herbs to drive away or kill
spirits that may have already invaded their
100 bodiesB44 The final paragraph of Passage 2 emphasizes
which aspect of the spirit world?
(A) its benevolence
(B) its immortality
(C) its malevolence
(D) its omnipresence
(E) its wisdom

44. C This paragraph discusses those funerary
practices that are used to prevent evil spirits from
hovering (line 92) or attacking (line 95) and to drive
away spirits that have already invaded (line 99).
These terms suggest the malevolence of the spirit
world.

6

The oldest, most numerous, and most
imposing relics of our ancestors are funerary.
At different times and places the dead bodies of
20 human beings have been honored in an
amazing variety of ways. They have been buried
in graves or in tombs or under tumuli or inside
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3
Æ z
CHAPTER 14 / PRACTICE PSAT 4 489pyramids. They have been burnt on pyres, and
the ashes have been preserved in urns or have
25 been scattered to the winds. They have even
been exposed to be eaten by carrion birds or by
scavenging wild animals—not because they
were held in honor, but because earth, fire, and
water were held in still greater honor, and these
30 elements were thought to be defiled and
dishonored by contact with a human corpse.
B45 The description of funerary rites in lines
21–31 accounts for the practices of which
of the following discussed in Passage 2?
I. the Calatians
II. the Zoroastrians
III. Queen Artemisia
(A) I only
(B) II only
(C) I and II only
(D) II and III only
(E) I, II, and III

B. The CAlatians and Queen Artemisia consumed their dead, a practice which is no discussed in Passage 1. The Zorostrians, on the other hand, left their dead to scavengers, which is a practice discussed in lines 21-31 of Passage 1.

7

If r and s are positive integers and r , s, how
many integer pairs (r, s) satisfy the equation
4r þ 5s , 30 ?

6 r and s must be positive integers. Use trial
and error to plug in numbers and find out how
many pairs will work given the rules of the question.
4r þ 5s , 30
r ¼ 1 4(1) þ 5s , 30
Subtract 4: 5s , 26
s could be 2, 3, 4, or 5
r ¼ 2 4(2) þ 5s , 30
Subtract 8: 5s , 22
CHAPTER 14 / PRACTICE PSAT 4 513

8

On a blueprint that is drawn to scale, the
drawing of a rectangular garden has the
dimensions 10 inches by 14 inches. If the
shorter side of the garden measures 25 feet,
what is the perimeter of the actual garden?

120
14 in
10 in
x ft
25 ft
The shorter side of the garden measures 25 feet in
length and is represented on the map as 10 inches.
The longer side of the garden would be represented
by the 14-inch side on the map.
Set up a proportion: 10 inches
25 feet ¼ 14 inches
x feet
Cross-multiply: 10x ¼ 350
Divide by 10: x ¼ 35
To find the perimeter, add up all the sides:
35 þ 25 þ 35 þ 25 ¼ 120
(Chapter 11 Lesson 5: Areas and Perimeters)
(Chapter 8 Lesson 4: Ratios and Proportions)

9

For all integers m and n greater than 1,
let m A n represent the sum of all of the
common factors of m and n. What is the
value of (24 A 36) A (33 A 44)?

38. 7 We are told that m A n ¼ the sum of all of the
common factors of m and n. To solve this question,
first find out the value of (24 A 36):
Factors of 24: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 24
Factors of 36: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18, 36
Therefore (24 A 36) ¼ 1 þ 2 þ 3 þ 4 þ 6 þ 12 ¼ 28
Next, find out the value of (33 A 44):
Factors of 33: 1, 3, 11, 33
Factors of 44: 1, 2, 4, 11, 22, 44
Therefore (33 A 44) ¼ 1 þ 11 ¼ 12
Finally, find out the value of (28 A 12):
Factors of 28: 1, 2, 4, 7, 14, 28
Factors of 12: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12
Therefore (28 A 12) ¼ 1 þ 2 þ 4 ¼ 7
(Chapter 10 Lesson 1: New Symbol or Term
Problems)

10

Neither of the boy scouts appreciated the historical significance of their climb to the top of the mountain.

A. Neither of the boy scouts appreciated the historical significance of their climb to the top of the mountain.
B. Neither of the boy scouts had appreciated the historical significance of his climbing to the top of the mountain.
C. Neither boy scout would be appreciating the historical signifcance of their clmb to the top of the mountain.
D. Neither boy scout having climbed the mountain appreciated the historical significance of it.
E. Neither of the boy scouts that climbed the mountain appreciated the significance of it.

x7. D The use of the passive voice in the original
phrasing does not make it clear who is remembering.
Choice (D) is the only one that uses the proper tense
and voice to convey the idea clearl

11

Research has
A
indicated that an infant’s
environment has a crucial effect
B
on brain
development; the more stimulation a baby
receives, the more
C
synaptic connections are
formed in the brain, which
D
contributes to
greater intellectual ability later in life.No error
E

24. E The sentence is correct

12

When Maria returned home from the amusement park, she wrote down in her diary everything that she did that afternoon

A WHen
B from the
C she wrote
D she did
E No error.

30. D Because Maria wrote in her diary after she
had gone to the amusement park, the verb should
be she had done.
(Chapter 13 Lesson 9: Tricky Tenses)

13

Which of the following is the best revision of
sentence 13 (reproduced below) ?
Bush ended up having won the state of Florida
by a mere 537 votes.
(A) (No revision is necessary.)
(B) Bush having won the state of Florida by
a mere 537 votes.
(C) Bush did win the state of Florida by a
mere 537 votes.
(D) Bush ended up the winner of the state of
Florida, by a mere 537 votes.
(E) By a mere 537 votes, the winner of the
state of Florida had been Bush

39. A The sentence is correct as written.