Pressure Groups Flashcards Preview

Uk Politics > Pressure Groups > Flashcards

Flashcards in Pressure Groups Deck (13)
Loading flashcards...
1

Explain and analyse reasons for pressure groups being ‘insiders’ (1).

Give examples.

‘Core insiders’ have a strong two way relationship with the government and advises the policy makes over a broad range of issues.
Example= the British Medical Association advise the government on the issue of health care.

2

Explain and analyse reasons for pressure groups being ‘insiders’ (2).

Give examples.

‘Specialist insiders’ are groups that focus on a specific issue and are contacted by the government when the issue comes in to the national stage.
This Varies with significant as it depends on who’s in government and wether the issue is prominent at that particular time
Example=World wide fund for nature focuses on wilderness protection with is not a large issue with in the UK.

3

Explain and analyse reasons for pressure groups being ‘insiders’ (3).

Give examples.

Insiders tend to abide my the ‘rules of the game’ this means the method don’t involve direct action or threaten the stability of the government.
...

4

Explain and analyse 3 reasons for people joining pressure groups (1).

Give examples.

People join pressure groups for representation if they believe the two main parties are not embodying their concerns or don’t agree with their views.
This tends to be more the case with minority view points at there is limited other places they can go.
Example=‘LIFE’ is a pro-life charity in response to the Abortion Act. With both the main parties pro-abortion or are indifferent their is nowhere else to go.

5

Explain and analyse 3 reasons for people joining pressure groups (2).

Give examples.

Some people join for material benefits. People gain certain benefits from joining normally non-political pressure groups.
However this means that the members of the group are not passionate about the issue the pressure group is about.
Example=The AA provide breakdown cover to members that sign up.

6

Explain and analyse 3 reasons for people joining pressure groups (3).

Give examples.

Some people join pressure groups because they believe they have to. This could be because of job protection in the case of trade unions or because its the only way to achieve a goal.
This has become more significant due to the government cut due to the financial crisis meaning some benefit of public jobs have reduced.
‘The National Union’ of Teachers protect jobs in education.

7

Example and analyse 3 pressure group’s methods (1).

Give examples.

Lobbying is when pressure groups meet with civil servants and politician in order to argue their case and persuade them.
This is significant as it is a direct link between the pressure groups and legislative.
Example=The National Union of Teachers will regularly influence through lobbying to further their goals.

8

Example and analyse 3 pressure group’s methods (2).

Give examples.

Outsider pressure groups may organise public demonstrations. This raise public awareness for their cause. This may include marches, rallies and large scale demonstrations.
This is significant as it lets the government see the magnitude of public opinion and can suede the government opinions.
Example=‘stop the war coalition’ staged a peaceful protest in 2003 in response to the unpopular Iraq war.

9

Example and analyse 3 pressure group’s methods (3).

Give examples.

One method is striking. Mostly used by outsider groups and trade union. Strikes can be damaging and unpopular.
Strikes significant has been weakened over the last 40 years starting with Margret thatcher who introduced a number of reform to reduce their impact. The significant of this depends on who in government.
Example=insiders also strike. The British Medical Association organised a strike in 2016 due to a dispute over the contract for junior doctor.

10

Explain and analyse a reasons for pressure groups being ‘outsides’ (1).

Give examples.

‘Ideological outsiders’ don’t want insider status. The government view on the topic may oppose their view, so they must be outsiders so they don’t compromise on beliefs.
This depends on who is currently in government, if a party gets into power which ideology lines up to the pressure groups they may not maintain the outsider status.
Example=‘LIFE’ is a pro-life charity in response to the Abortion Act 1967. As both main parties are pro-choice it will likely always be an outsider.

11

Explain and analyse a reasons for pressure groups being ‘outsides’ (2).

Give examples.

Some pressure groups are ‘outsides by necessity’. For a pressure group to preserve its methods of promoting technology cause. This is mainly ‘direct action’
The significant of this has increased due to the growth of social media which has let publicity stunts travel quickly around the world.
Example=Greenpeace perform many publicity stunt to further their cause and because of this must maintain it outsider status.

12

Explain and analyse a reasons for pressure groups being ‘outsides’ (3).

Give examples.

’Potential insider’ groups are in the process of becoming insiders or are insiders depending on who’s in government.
This varies in significant as it depends who in government.
Example=trade unions such as the National Union of Teachers are potential insiders as they will likely be outsiders during the conservative terms and insiders during labours.

13

Explain and analyse one reasons for pressure group failure (1).

Give examples.

If the pressure group’s issue contradict that view of the of the government, it is unlikely the that the group will be successful.
This has increased With significant as politics have become more partisan meaning less ground is covered by the two main parties meaning it is more likely to be rejected.
Example=‘LIFE’ is a pro-life charity that have protested the 1967 Abortion Act, but so far have been unsuccessful mainly because both major parties are pro-choice.