Quiz 3 Respiratory Bugs Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Quiz 3 Respiratory Bugs Deck (33)
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1

Gram negative rod, Ferment glucose, Oxidase negative, Reduce nitrates to nitrites

Definition of Enterics:

2

Gram negative coccobacillus, aerobic, causes whooping cough, but can also cause bronchitis. Upper and lower tract.

Bordatella pertussis

3

Gram negative. Involved with CAP, lower tract, atypical, common in younger people.

Chlamydophila pneumoniae

4

Gram negative. Lower tract- “atypical”- associated with birds, parakeets.

Chlamydophila psittaci

5

Gram positive, pleomorphic. Can cause strep throat, and obviously diptheria. Causes grey necrotic area on tonsils. Myocarditis from Toxin.

Corynebacterium diphtheriae

6

Gram negative anaerobe. Pharyngeal abscesses.

Fusobacterium spp.

7

Gram negative coccobacillus, involved with epiglottitis, otitis media. Involved with CAP. Only grows on chocolate agar. Requires both X&V factor.

Haemophilus influenzae

8

Gram negative rod. Involved with CAP. Use urine antigen detection. Lower tract, atypical, contaminated water, cruise ships, hotels.

Legionella pneumophila.

9

Gram negative cocci (one of the very few). Involved with Otitis Media, one of the three, also with CAP.

Moraxella catarrhalis

10

Gram Positive. TB and chronic pneumonia.

Mycobacterium tuberculosis

11

Bacteria without cell wall, and therefore resistant to many antibiotics. Involved with CAP. Lower tract, atypical, often in younger people.

Mycoplasma pneumoniae

12

Gram negative rod, non-lactose fermenting, pyocyanin test is blue. Rare except for patients on ventilator.

Pseudomonas aeruginosa

13

Gram positive cocci. HCAP, abscesses around lung or tonsils, along with anaerobes. Rare except for hospital or ventilator.

Staphylococcus aureus

14

Gram positive diplococci. Most common pathogen for otitis, sinusitis, and CAP. Sits in nasopharynx. Has vaccination. Acute pneumonia. Consolidation, air space CXR.

Streptococcus pneumoniae

15

Gram positive cocci in twisted chains. Main cause of strep throat. Upper and Lower tract.

Streptococcus pyogenes

16

Gram negative rod, lactose fermenting, aerobic, usually HCAP, lung abscesses, bloody sputum, involved in secondary infections after viruses, alcholism. Red current jelly sputum.

Klebsiella pneumonia

17

-Viral pharyngitis, only DNA virus on list.

Adenovirus

18

SARS. Asians drink Coronas.

Coronavirus

19

From rodents.

Hantavirus

20

Second most common cause of lower respiratory tract infections next to RSV in kids.

Human metapneumovirus

21

Inflammation of parotid gland, testicles, encephalitis, direct contact most common. Paramyxoviridae.

Mumps virus

22

Viral pharyngitis, and most importantly, croup (laryngotracheitis.  Paramyxoviridae.

Parainfluenza virus

23

-Upper and Lower tract, can go down and cause bronchitis. Paramyxoviridae.

RSV

24

-Upper Respiratory Tract infection, common cold.

Rhinovirus

25

Epstein Barr Virus - Infectious Mononucleosis, similar symptoms to Strep but with fatigue, also big with pharyngitis.

Epstein Barr Virus

26

-For this, think patient with leukemia, immunocompromised. Chronic pneumonia

Aspergillus fumigatus

27

-Southern Utah infection, granulomatous lung infection.

Coccidiodes immitis

28

-Mississippi valley granulomatous fungal infection.

Histoplasma capsulatum

29

Sinus more than lungs.

Mucor spp.

30

-Most common anaerobes -

Gram Negative -Bacteroides (most common): Intra-abdominal infections -Fusobacterium: Abscesses, wound infections, and pulmonary and intracranial infections -Porphyromonas: Aspiration pneumonia and periodontitis -Prevotella: Intra-abdominal and soft-tissue infections

-Gram Positive -Actinomyces: Head, neck, abdominal, and pelvic infections and aspiration pneumonia -Clostridium: Gas gangrene due to C. perfringens, food poisoning due to C. perfringens type A, botulism due to C. botulinum, tetanus due to C. tetani, and C. difficile–induced diarrhea (pseudomembranous colitis) -Peptostreptococcus: Oral, respiratory, and intra-abdominal infections -Propionibacterium: Foreign body infections (eg, in a cerebrospinal fluid shunt, prosthetic joint, or cardiac device)

Most common anaerobes: