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Flashcards in reckless valour Deck (17)
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1

where is ql2 based and who is the artistic director?

- based in canberra, QL2 is an audition only youth dance ensemble that was founded by ruth osborne in 1999.

2

what is the company dedicated to?

- the company is dedicated to diverse, challenging and rigorous youth dance which develops the next generation of dance-makers and contributes to a dynamic, caring and diverse society.

3

where have they presented performances and who to?

- they have presented performances in jamaica, scotland, canberra, sydney, adelaide, to both audiences and critical acclaim.

4

what is their mission statement?

- QL2 is passionate about extending youth dance beyond training, beyond ‘kids dancing; to immersive, creative, demanding and ongoing dance experiences.
- they emphasise the power of young people to drive cultural change and value the unique view post and creativity of each young person.

5

list some of ql2's dance works

- some of their dance works include giant steps, hot to trot, on course and reckless valour

6

background info on quantum leap

- based in canberra, QL2 is an audition only youth dance ensemble that was founded by ruth osborne in 1999.
- the company is dedicated to diverse, challenging and rigorous youth dance which develops the next generation of dance-makers and contributes to a dynamic, caring and diverse society.
- they have presented performances in jamaica, scotland, canberra, sydney, adelaide, to both audiences and critical acclaim.
- QL2 is passionate about extending youth dance beyond training, beyond ‘kids dancing; to immersive, creative, demanding and ongoing dance experiences.
- they emphasise the power of young people to drive cultural change and value the unique view post and creativity of each young person.
- running very accessible and affordable programmes for ages 8-26 QL2 focuses on igniting and developing young peoples creative energy and dance skills.
- some of their dance works include giant steps, hot to trot, on course and reckless valour

7

what type of programmes do they run?

- they focus running very accessible and affordable programmes for ages 8-26 QL2 focuses on igniting and developing young peoples creative energy and dance skills.

8

where was it first staged? and what did it commemorate?

- was first staged in canberra in 2005 to commemorate the 90th anniversary of the anzac landings at gallipoli and the 60th anniversary of the end of wwii.

9

when did it premiere?

- premiering in july 2005 at the canberra theatre playhouse

10

who is the artistic director and choreographers?

- under the artistic direction of ruth osborne, a group of respected guest choreographers, jodie farrugia, natalie cursio, rowan marchingo, vivienne rogis and fiona malone.

11

what happened in 2015? and why?

- it has been restaged, redeveloped and reimagined for 2015, the centenary year of the anzac landing.

12

what is the intent?

- it is a moving tribute to young australians in war, and was created in collaboration with and explores the architecture of the australian war memorial.
- through an episodic structure, the australian war memorial is the emotional and intellectual heart of act 1. whilst act 2 looks to the present and the future. grappling with the consequences of war for soldiers and civilians, and how war affects refugees, migrants and cultural identity.
- it pays homage to the courage of ordinary people in extraordinary circumstances.
- inviting us to contemplate nationhood, service, and sacrifice; and to celebrate the power of young people to shape the future. through this journey we are seeking connections between history and contemporary culture: what war means to australians, especially young australians.
- reckless valour is a timeless reminder of why we must never forget those who gave their lives for the country and why new generations of school children should be educated about it.
- the performance gives young minds an insight into one of the major influences of the australian identity.

13

explain the pool of reflection and link it to the learning context

- duos: dancer lays down whilst other dancer stands directly in front of them as if mirroring them. they contract from the core and peer intensively at each other. one dancer is on a low level whilst the other is on a high level which utilises space to add interest to the movement. the reflection explores the concept of water being man’s first mirror, in turn exploring mans relationship with war and ourselves. ultimately looking at the idea of reflection as a way to reflect and reject, remember and deny. making us contemplate about what we see when we look in the mirror
- jodie farrugia has stated that the section was a choreographic collaboration with the dancers and that the process allows them to express their feelings on the idea. this undoubtedly aligns with QL2’s mission statement as it encourages the dancers to be creative and facilitates them with choreographic experience
- it calls us to reflect upon the war and ultimately evoking thought about how we learn from the past
- it shows the capability and potential of youth voice, who hold the key to the future.
- deep blue wash on stage and cyc: reinforcing idea of the water in the pool of reflection

14

what is the intent of the roll of honour?

- demonstrates the enormity of the war and the impacts on the families of those who made the ultimate sacrifice for the country, both honouring and humanising the soldiers.

15

the hall of memory

- sound : gushes of wind, water droplets, bubbling water, sound of boiling water
- lighting: of the indicative colours - representing each of the elements and in turn representing the four pillars which form an important part of the architecture of the war memorial
- the different pillars of the 4 elements that combines make weather, could represent the weather conditions the soldiers must go through when they are at war, and what the soldiers must fight through, linking to the hardships of war. once again enforcing the idea that war doesn't stop for anyone. in our lives weather can dictate whether we decide to go to the beach or stay home, whether we decide to walk instead of drive - mother nature cannot stop for anyone. just like the unpredictable nature of the weather, war too is rather unpredictable and nothing is assured, soldiers cant assure their families they will be returning home..
- the dancers lift, carry and support each other to form tableaus that resemble the 4 pillars.
- earth pillar - made of marble and has associations with permanence and endurance, physical structure and the coldness of death. symbolic of the soldiers fighting in the battlefield.
- metal pillar - symbolises fire; it is associated with energy and passion, patriotism and bravery. symbolic of the explosions and destruction that is caused by war and the conditions that the soldiers have to fight in.
- wooden pillar - symbolises air; its polished surface is associated with disembodied spirit and the souls of the dead. symbolic of the air force and those involved in fighting the war from above (also reinforced by the helicopter sounds)
- water pillar - is made of glass, ice-like and colourless. linked with the flow of change and transfiguration and the souls of the living. symbolic of the navy force .
→ these elements are associated with aspects of life and death, creation and destruction and the seasons of the year. without specific religious reference they support the symbolism of waller's mosaics and stained glass.

16

the unknown soldier

- voice over: “we do not know this australians name and we never will. we do not know his rank or his battalion. we do not know where he was born, nor precisely where or how he died …… we will never know who this australian was” powerful voice over recognising the unknown soldier as a representative for australians who have fallen in subsequent wars and will fall in future wars. his tomb reads "he is all of them, and he is one of us."
- one dancers is lifted up whilst the others slowly crowd around, reaching back into a high release with arms in a high v – canon and repetition - the look like flowers opening to the sun, perhaps representing the flowers in the wreaths around the unknown soldier’s tomb, or the wreaths themselves.
- allows dancers to tell a story that forms an important part of australian identity

17

lest we forget

- this is a section about our rituals of remembering the fallen from personal homage and tributes to the public payers of dawn service on ANZAC day
- manipulation duos: motif of hands over ears – one partner is symbolic of government trying to get australians to go to war, representative of how war controls us. the government declared war and decided as a country they would have to fight in the war, no referendum, no voting they didn't have a decision – seen through involuntary arm and leg ‘twitches’
- “listen” repeated by dancers asking the government to listen to their opinions and what they have to say about the war, and how they do not want to fight
- this is accompanied by a voice over from the prime minister of australia declaring war