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Flashcards in Religion and Animal Rights Issues Deck (23)
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1

What is meant by 'vivisection'?

The process of experimenting on animals

2

What does UK law say about experiments on animals?

Not for beauty but must be used for safety of household products and medicines (test on rodent and non before humans), labs inspected for welfare standards.

3

What are the arguments for animal experimentation?

Humans more important.
Many vaccines and cures found through it.

4

What are the arguments against animal experimentation?

Animals and humans are different e.g. case of Ryan Wilson.
Should be using alternatives – tissue cultures, computer programs.
Animals are living, sentient beings who can feel pain.

5

What are the arguments for keeping animals in zoos?

Breeding programs
Help with preservation
Educate people about wildlife.

6

What are the arguments against keeping animals in zoos?

Not cared for
Not natural environment - so creates unnatural behaviour
Breeding programs not effective.
Money making 1st?

7

What are the alternative to zoos?

Wildlife Preservation – Case Study: Born Free
To prevent EXTINCTION Born Free works to protect natural habitats and educate local people about how to live alongside animals. Part of Species Survival Network and raise awareness about endangered animals.

8

What is the fur trade?

An industry for making money based on the fur of animals. 55 million animals killed for fur many kept in small cages. Recent support in UK – adds £500 million to UK economy and natural renewable source.

9

What is the ivory trade?

Industry based on capturing wild animals and removing their ivory e.g. tusks. Often from endangered species e.g. black rhino.
In 1989 UN made illegal but now allows some. Difficult to stop - poachers are taking it illegally.

10

What are the arguments for hunting animals?

Part of nature and survival, helps countryside removing pests and part of British tradition.

11

What are the arguments against hunting animals?

Killing for sport is inhumane.
Chasing and killing a fox with hounds is cruel (led to 2004 Ban on hare coursing and hunting with dogs).

12

What are the arguments for bull fighting?

Tradition, bull will be killed anyway.
Cruel, degrading, bulls teased, speared until collapse and die of injuries

13

What are the arguments against bull fighting?

Cruel, degrading, bulls teased, speared until collapse and die of injuries

14

What is free-range farming and why is it supported?

Animals are given natural conditions to live in so it improves animal welfare but more expensive to produce.

15

What is factory farming?

Animals are kept in 'factory' like conditions often cramped and dark. It's cheaper and meets consumer demand, but many e.g.s of ill treatment such as de-beaking chickens as they get aggressive.

16

What is the difference between 'vegetarian' and 'vegan'?

Vegetarians do not EAT meat or fish
Vegans don’t USE any animal products e.g. not dairy or wear leather.

17

Why do some people become vegetarian?

Do not want animals harmed
Part of their religion e.g. Buddhists
Object to way animals are produced, kept and slaughtered
For health reasons (links to cancer and heart disease)
Help the environment (feed 6X more people on vegetarian diet)

18

Name and describe 3 organisations who support animal welfare.

RSPCA - provides education for pet owners, raising standards in farms and improving welfare for wild animals.
PETA - focuses on four areas: opposition to factory farming, fur farming, animal testing and the use of animals for entertainment such as circus or bullfighting.
League against Cruel Sports - Campaigns to keep the Fox Hunting ban in place.

19

How can religious believers support animal rights issues? 3 ways.

1. Avoid animal-tested products.
2. Support the work of animal welfare groups such as RSPCA by giving a monthly donation.
3. Raising awareness about how animals can be mistreated.

20

What is GM?

Genetic Modification - Animals genetically changed to see how genes work and test new drugs e.g. ‘oncomouse’ born with cancer.

21

What is cloning?

Create exact copy e.g. Dolly the sheep produced protein to help with lung diseases. But many animal embryos destroyed. Fear of money as main aim, health and safety risks.

22

What does Christianity teach about animal rights issues?
... and which 2 moral rules do NOT apply to animals?

1. NOT EQUAL – Humans only made in image of
God – so humans come first.
2. But God’s CREATION and cared for (Luke 12 - sparrows)
3. Humans have responsibility of STEWARDSHIP (God's role on Earth)
4. DOMINION – some say this authority means animals placed on Earth for human to use as need to.
5. 10 Commandments and 'love your neighbour' DO NOT apply to animals and plenty of examples of Jesus eating meat and fish.

23

What are Buddhist teachings about animal rights issues?

5 Precepts - 1st – Non-violence (ahimsa)
4 Noble Truths – Anger, ignorance , greed (3 Poisons) lead to suffering
Noble Eightfold Path – Right Action, Livelihood, Awareness, Intentions (linked to karma).
Animals SENTIENT beings – part of samsara .
METTA – Loving kindness to all (including animals)