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Flashcards in risk assessment Deck (41):
1

What two vaccines are used for HPV prevention in women?

cervarix and gardasil, both three doses over six months

2

What is the most common cancer killer in the adolescent period for males?

testicular cancer

3

If a patient is going to college and going to live in a dorm, in the military, foreign travel, they should get revaccinated with what vaccine?

meningococcal vaccine

4

Who gets influenza vaccine and how often?

everybody, annually

5

When should a complete physical exam be done and how often?

starting at the age 20 and every 5-6 years (unless something is found)

6

At what age should pap smears begin and how often should they be repeated?

start age 20

repeat every 3 years until age 30 and then every 5 years

7

What age should self-breast exam begin?

age 21

8

At what age do we recommend mammography?

age 40

9

At what age can you discontinue mammograms?

age 75

10

At what age do you begin digital rectal exam and PSA in a healthy male?

age 40 for DRE

age 50 for PSA

11

At what age do you begin colorectal cancer screening?

age 50

12

What is the main causes of death in adults in the US?

1) heart disease

2) cancer

3) lower respiratory disease

4) CVA

13

Tonometry is screening for_____ and this screening should be done by age 40 for all adults.

glaucoma

14

What is zostavax and at what age is it given?

herpes zoster (shingles) vaccine

given at age 50 or older

15

At what age do we discontinue the pap smear with consecutive negative cytology?

age 65-70

16

Pneumococcal vaccine is recommended at the age 19-64 if patient smokes, has asthma, or chronic disease.

Pneumococcal vaccine is recommended in healthy people age: 

65+

17

The degree to those who actually have the disease test positive +.  The positives show positive.

Sensitivity

18

Those who do not have the disease show negative -.  

The negatives show negatives.

specificity

19

D-dimer has a low sensitivity, but because the negatives show negative, the d-dimer has a high

specificity

20

Incidence

the frequency at which a disease appears at a given time

the rate at which the disease occurs during a certain period

21

Prevelance

Proportion of a population effected by disease at a particular time

%

22

Most common causes of death in the young adults

1. MVA

2. suicide/homocide

3. heart disease

23

What are some examples of Primary prevention?

vaccination 

immunization 

diet 

exercise

24

What is primary prevention?

measures to promote health PRIOR to the onset of any recognizable problem

 

Prevents the onset of the disease

25

Secondary prevention includes:

Screening

pap smear

cholesterol check

dental exams

Methods to detect and address an existing disease prior to the appearance of symptoms

attempts to prevent an asymptomatic disease from progressing to symptomatic disease

26

Examples of tertiary prevention

cardiac or stroke rehab

 

Methods to reduce negative impact of symptomatic disease, such as disability or death, through rehabilitation and treatment

 

tertiary prevention attempts to reduce the damage caused by symptomatic disease by focusing on mental, physical, and social rehabilitation

 

27

What % is the recommended carbohydrate daily intake?

55-60%

28

How much protein does an adult need each day?

0.8-1gm/kg/day

The sicker the patient the higher their protein needs.

29

Exercise helps to decrease what type of cholesterol?

LDL

30

What is the AHA recommendation for exercise?

30 minutes or more on most days of the week with a targeted HR.

 

It doesn't have to be 30 consecutive minutes

31

If your patient is over 35 and has NEVER had an exercise regimen, prior to starting exercise what 3 things should they have?

Complete history

complete medical exam

 exercise stress test

32

What is the difference between the antigen and the antibody?

the antigen is "the bad guy"

the antibody is the substance that the body makes to fight the antigen

33

active immunity comes from what?

Antibody formation in response to an antigen

for example, tetanus toxoid is the antigen to which your body makes antibodies

34

passive immunization

gained by the introduction of gamma globulin injections

OR

from mom to fetus

35

The gamma globulin injection hgib is given to a patient with known hep B exposure who has not been previously_____.

This is an example of (active? or passive?) immunization because it involves gamma globulin.

vaccinated.

Passive immunity

36

Can people less than 65 years old with weakened immune systems or those living in a long term care facility receive pneumococcal vaccine?

Yes, people less than 65 years old with weakened immune systems SHOULD receive a pneumococcal vaccine.

37

Per the CDC, the recommendation for Hep A vaccine is for:

military

travelers to endemic areas

men who have sex with men

 

38

The CDC recommendation for Hep B vaccine is for:

all healthcare workers

high risk patients including sexually active adults

39

Is there a vaccine for hep A, hep B, and hep C?

There is a vaccine for hep A and hep B.

 

There is NO vaccination for hep C. 

40

According to the CDC, who needs the Meningococcal vaccine?

all 11-12 year olds with a booster at age 16

adults living in college dorms

adult military

adult and pediatric patients with spleenectomy 

41