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Flashcards in Specific Voice Disorders 2 Deck (21):
1

What are the 3 types of spasmodic dysphonia?

AD-ductor, AB-ductor, and mixed

2

What happens to the VF in AD-ductor spasmodic dysphonia?

They spasm shut; extreme hyperfunction

3

How does the voice sound in AD-ductor spasmodic dysphonia?

Strained with a low intensity

4

What does the label describe in spastic dysphonias?

What the VF DO. This is the opposite of VF paralysis!

5

What is the easiest way to diagnose the difference between the two types of spastic dysphonia?

Perceptually - it's the most reliable!

6

What do people call spastic dysphonia a laryngeal stutter?

Many characteristics that are similar; speaker begins to expect difficulty phonating, but no difficulty with singing or laughing. As people try to control it it becomes more difficult.

Primary etiology is neurological for both.

7

What is observable at the moment of aphonia during AB-ductor spastic dysphonia?

A glottal chink

8

What gender is spastic dysphonia more common in?

Females

9

What is the average age of onset for spastic dysphonia?

50

10

What are the most common medical treatments for spastic dysphonia?

Paralyze one VF with an injection of something first, if that doesn't work they may cut the RLN. May also do Botox injections.

11

What is the patient's voice like in functional aphonia?

It's an involuntary whisper; no voice with a normal larynx.

12

How must functional aphonia be diagnosed?

With a laryngeal exam.

13

What are some of the most common etiologies for functional aphonia?

May occur after severe laryngitis or upper respiratory illness. Could also occur after surgery. May also be a sudden onset as a reaction to a psychological condition.

14

What is the best treatment approach for functional aphonia?

Explaining and discussing the problem, and then shaping their voice from another type of phonation (cough, gargle, hum).

15

What is hypernasality?

Excessive, undesirable amounts of nasal resonance during phonation of vowels and non-nasal consonants.

16

What is hyponasality?

Lack of nasal resonance on /m, n, and ng/; may also affect vowels

17

What is assimilative nasality?

Occurs on vowels adjacent to nasal consonants; often occurs in individuals with neurological disorders

18

What are some of the most common etiologies of hypernasality?

Cleft palate, fistulas, injuries to palatal areas, etc.

19

What is the best treatment for hypernasality?

Surgery! All the voice therapy in the world will not be helpful if there is inadequate VP function.

20

What is mutational falsetto also known as?

Puberphonia

21

What is mutational falsetto characterized by?

Failure to change from a high pitched voice to a lower pitch typical of post-pubescence; larynx has a normal structure but is positioned high in the neck.