UE Amputations Flashcards Preview

PTH 703 - Unit 2 (Amputations and Protheses) > UE Amputations > Flashcards

Flashcards in UE Amputations Deck (63)
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1

What is osseointegration?

Direct attachment to the bone; no socket required

Can be used with myoelectrics; Maximize existing ROM

2

What is a common problem with osseointegration?

Infection

3

Where can you receive osseointegration?

Europe (possibly US soon)

4

Who wore the first UE prosthesis?

Roman general, Marcus Sergius

No advancements until 1800s

5

What are 6 different UE prothesis we learned about?

None
Passive (semi-hensile)
Cable-operated
Electric
Hybrid
Adaptive/activity-specific

6

How many UE amputees wear a prosthesis?

Less than 50%

7

What are benefits and limitations of no prosthesis? (4,4)

Comfort
Proprioception
Mobility
Simplicity
---
Functional range of motion
Active prehension (typically)
Balance
Cosmesis

8

What is a Passive (Semi-Prehensile) Prosthesis?

A cosmetic restoration with limited functional capabilities.

Used for functional activities that do not require active prehension.

(Typically digits can be manipulated to enhance function).

9

What are benefits of a passive (Semi-Prehensile) Prosthesis? (6)

Provides opposition
Can be cosmetic
Can be lightweight
Most are simple
Usually little maintenance
Can be inexpensive

10

What are limitations of a passive (Semi-Prehensile) Prosthesis? (4)

No active prehension
Limited function
Durability
Patient can have unreal expectations for cosmesis

11

What are 3 different types of passive (semi-prehensile) prosthesis?

Finger
Partial Hand
Higher Level

12

How does Cable-Operated Prosthesis work?

Powered and controlled by gross body movements captured by a harness system

13

What are the 2 basic requirements for cable-operation?

1. Excursion (utilize body motions for control)

2. Force (force associated with those body motions)

14

Benefits of cable-operated prosthesis? (4)

Reduced weight

Reduced maintenance cost

Prehensor shape allows for improved visibility

Increased excursion velocity

15

Limitations of Cable-Operated Prosthesis?

Grip strength or pinch force

Functional range of motion

Restrictive and uncomfortable harness

Poor static and dynamic cosmesis

Axilla anchor (possible nerve entrapment syndrome)

Atrophy of intrinsic muscles within encapsulated limb

Poor correlation between the neuromuscular system utilized for prosthetic action and that utilized for normal human movement

16

What is an electrically powered prosthesis?

Powered by battery systems and are controlled by various input methods

17

What are the different control options for an electrically powered prosthesis? (7)

Myoelectric (single or dual side)
Switch:
-Rocker
-Pull
-Push
Touch Pads (FSR's)
Servo
Linear Potentiometers

18

What is the most common electric system?

Myoelectric control

19

How does myoelectric control work?

Surface EMG signals are developed by muscle contractions that are used by microporcessors to control elbows, wrists, and hands, or other terminal devices

20

What are benefits of an electrically powered prosthesis? (5)

Increased functional ROM
Provides functional cosmetic restoration
Increased grip strength
Harness system reduced or eliminated
-Improved comfort

21

What are 6 reasons people may choose to not use a UE prosthesis?

Bad first experience

Financial concerns

Unaware of options

Limited functional ability

Not worth the “hassle”

No rehabilitation program

22

What prosthesis is used for activities that do not require active prehension?

Passive (Semi-prehensile) Prosthesis

23

What prosthesis would you use for increased excursion velocity and improved visibility? (assuming you don't care about poor cosmesis)

Cable-operated prosthesis

24

What type of battery is separated for more options?

Split cell

Split cell batteries are a nice option if space is limited within the prosthesis. As shown in the transcarpal fitting, the split cell batteries were placed inside the 4th and 5th digit of the hand shell, therefore reducing the bulk inside the prosthesis.

25

What are 9 different terminal devices we learned about in class?

Sensorhand Speed

Transcarpal hand

DMC hand

Motion Control hand

ETD

Greifer

VASI

System 2000

I-Limb

26

What terminal limb uses coding plugs to change the control mode?

Sensorhand speed

Myoselect
Increased speed- 300mm/sec
Auto grasp feature
Flexigrip feature

27

Which prosthetic hand offers an auto grasp feature?

Otto Bock Sensorhand Speed-

28

What terminal limb is:

Available as DMC or Digital twin

1/3 the weight and length of adult hands?

Transcarpal hand

Direct lamination to socket or QD option

Good lightweight option with endoskeletal adapter

29

T or F: The transcarpal hand is not available with a quick disconnect feature

False (it does have a quick disconnect feature)

30

What are features of a motion control hand? (6)

Can operate with up to 18 volts (faster)
Made of high strength lightweight composite
Battery save feature (shuts off power when max force is reached)
Wide finger opening (4 inches)
With or without controlled
Available with flexion wrist