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II. Anterior Segment Disease > Uveitis (F) > Flashcards

Flashcards in Uveitis (F) Deck (58)
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1

What are the three tunics of the eye?

1. scleral
2. uveal
3. retinal

2

What are the three main aspects of uveitis to consider?

1. anatomical location
2. timing of inflammation
3. etiology

3

What are the three parts of the uvea (and the function of each)?

1. iris (light aperture)
2. ciliary body (accommodation and aqueous production)
3. choroid (nourishment to outer retina)

4

What are the types of anterior uveitis?

1. iritis
2. iridocyclitis

5

What are the types of intermediate uveitis?

pars planitis (includes pars plana, peripheral retina and vitreous)

6

What are the types of posterior uveitis?

1. choroiditis
2. retinitis
3. neuroretinitis

7

What is inflammation in the entire uveal tract without predominant site called?

panuveitis

8

What are the cutoffs for the time periods involved in duration of uveitis?

1. limited (3 months)
2. persistent (>3 months)

9

What course of uveitis is sudden in onset and has limited duration?

acute

10

What course of uveitis comes back in

chronic

11

What course of uveitis comes back >3M after Tx D/C?

recurrent

12

What course of uveitis is inactive disease >3M after Tx D/C?

remission

13

What are the etiologies of inflammation of uveitis?

1. autoimmune
2. infectious
3. trauma
4. inherited
5. idiopathic
6. masquerading

14

How many cells per field are in each of the grades 0-4 in the anterior chamber?

0. no cells
0.5+. 0-5 cells
1+. 6-15 cells
2+. 16-25 cells
3+. 26-50 cells
4+. >50 cells

15

What must occur in order for tapering off steroids to begin?

2 step improvement on AC cells scale and/or flare scale

16

What is the milky appearance of AC due to accumulation of proteins called? 1. What is it due to? 2

1. flare
2. break down of blood-aqueous barrier

17

What are the descriptions for flare in the AC from grade 0-4?

0. complete absence
1. faint (barely detectable)
2. moderate (iris and lens details clear)
3. marked (iris and lens details hazy)
4. intense (coagulation, fibrin in AC)

18

What are inflammatory cells the deposit on the corneal endothelium called? 1. How many days after inflammation starts does this occur? 2.

1. keratic precipitates (KPs)
2. 2-3 days after

19

What are the three types of keratic precipitates (which are granulomatous?)?

1. small, fine, discrete, white (non-granulomatous) 1mm
3. stellate (non-granulomatous)

20

What are mutton fat KPs composed of?

1. epithelioid cells
2. mononuclear macrophages

21

When are stellate KPs seen?

1. Fuchs heterochromia
2. Herpes

22

Where do KPs usually precipitate on the cornea? 1. What is the exception? 2

1. inferior half
2. stellate KPs

23

What are iris adhesions due to protein and fibrin in AC called? 1. What is used to break the adhesion? 2

1. synechia
2. cycloplegia

24

Are posterior synechia or peripheral anterior synechia more common?

PS

25

What is it called when the iris pigment is imprinted on the lens following a synechia? 1. What is it associated with if sectorial iris atrophy is also seen? 2

1. Vossius ring
2. HZV

26

Which hypoyon is more fluid and not as flat?

hypoyon in Behcets disease

27

What are hemispheres of inflammatory cells that collect on the iris called?

iris nodules

28

What type of iris nodule is at the pupillary border (and is it granulomatous/ non or both)? 1. What type is on the anterior iris surface (granulomatous?)? 2. What type is in the angle (granulomatous?)? 3

1. Koeppe (non-gran and granulomatous)
2. Busacca (granulomatous)
3. Berlin (granulomatous)

29

Does acute anterior uveitis have inc or dec IOP? 1. Why? 2

1. decreased IOP
2. dec aqueous secretion

30

Does chronic anterior uveitis have inc or dec IOP? 1. Why? 2

1. inc IOP
2. build up of cell in or inflammation of trabecular meshwork