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Flashcards in vocab Deck (93):
1

academic journals:

Periodicals that publish research in a variety of scholarly fields. Also called scholarly journals.

2

adjacency

The opportunity for an advertiser to place an ad near a particular article.

3

blow-in cards:

Postcard-sized business-reply cards, usually containing subscription solicitations that are inserted into magazines during the production process.

4

CPM: Cost per thousand:

Cost per thousand: guideline for the price of each exposure of a customer to an ad.

5

circulation department:

The division of a magazine company charged with finding and keeping subscribers, managing the subscriber list, and promoting single-copy sales.

6

complementary copy:

Editorial material designed to enhance nearby advertising

7

consumer magazine:

Those that advertise and cover consumer products and consumer lifestyles.

8

contributing editor:

Title given to a magazine’s highest paid freelance writers, who sometimes polish others’ work.

9

controlled circulation:

Process by which publications are sent free to desired readers.

10

demographic editions:

Slightly different versions of the same magazine that go out to subscribers with different characteristics.

11

desktop publishing:

Producing a publication through the use of a personal computer; this enables one person to act as editor, publisher and writer.

12

elite stage of media development:

Phase of media evolution in which only the richest and best educated members of the population make use of a particular medium.

13

little magazines:

Industry term for literary magazines with small circulations.

14

mission statement:

A brief explanation of how a magazine will be unique, and what will make it successful.

15

muckraking:

Investigative journalism conducted for social reform.

16

paid circulation magazines:

Those for which readers actually pay subscription fees and newsstand charges.

17

pass-along circulation:

Readership beyond the original purchaser of a publication.

18

popular stage of media development:

Phase of media evolution in which a truly mass audience takes advantage of a particular medium.

19

professional journals:

Periodicals that doctors, lawyers, engineers, and other occupational groups rely on for information in their fields.

20

public relations magazines:

Magazines produced with the objective of making their parent organizations look good.

21

pulps:

Magazines produced on cheap paper with a low cultural reach, such as True Romance and True Confessions.

22

regional editions:

Slightly different versions of the same magazine produced for different geographic areas.

23

special interest magazines:

Those aimed at specific readers with specific concerns and tastes.

24

specialized stage of media development:

Phase of media evolution in which a particular medium tends to demassify, breaking up into segments for audience members with diverse and specialized interests.

25

zines:

Low cost, do-it-yourself magazines put out by fans on a variety of topics.

26

split-run editions:

Slightly different versions of the same magazine, as in demographic and regional editions.

27

webzines:

Magazines that appear only on the Internet, such as Slate and Salon.

28

trade magazines:

Those that focus on a particular business.

29

subscription fulfillment companies:

Businesses that specialize in soliciting magazine subscriptions.

30

sponsored magazines:

Those published by associations, such as National Geographic and Modern Maturity.

31

alternative press:

Publications whose viewpoint is radical or out of the mainstream.

32

Audit Bureau of Circulations:

Association that verifies newspaper and magazine distribution.

33

beat reporters:

Journalists who find and write stories in a specialized area.

34

bylines:

Identifications of reporters who write particular stories.

35

chain:

Companies that own the same type of medium in more than one market area.

36

Chicano press:

Part of Hispanic American newspaper industry that targets Mexican Americans.

37

circulation department:

The division of a print media company that manages distribution and sales.

38

Federalist Papers:

Essays that explained the new federal government to early Americans.

39

feature syndicates:

Brokers for newspaper entertainment and specialty items.

40

feature news:

Stories directed toward human interest and curiosity.

41

ethnic press:

That part of the newspaper industry aimed at particular cultural groups.

42

editorial page:

Section of newspaper reserved for opinion pieces.

43

general assignment reporters:

Journalists who can find and write stories in any area.

44

yellow journalism:

Era in which the increased competition among newspapers led to unprecedented sensationalism.

45

underground press:

Alternative newspapers of the 1960s and 1970s that passionately criticized cultural and political norms.

46

tabloids:

Newspapers characterized by a smaller size, a single fold, and abundant photographs.

47

shoppers:

Free-distribution newspapers consisting mostly of ads.

48

sensationalism:

Use of exaggeration and lurid elements to produce a startling effect.

49

seditious libel:

Law that made it illegal to criticize government.

50

publisher:

Person who runs a print media company and acts as its chief representative.

51

photo-offset printing:

Technique in which a photo negative transfers ink onto paper

52

penny press:

Inexpensive newspapers of the 1830s that were advertiser-supported.

53

partisan press:

Newspapers owned or supported by political parties

54

organizational papers:

Newspapers published to express an organization’s point of view.

55

op-ed page:

The section of the newspaper “opposite the editorial page” reserved for signed columns, opinion pieces and guest editorials.

56

objectivity:

Writing style that separates fact from fiction.

57

newsprint:

Inexpensive paper used for newspapers

58

news hole:

Total newspaper pages that can be devoted to content other than advertising.

59

mercantile press:

Newspapers that provided news of business and shipping.

60

investigative journalism:

Reporting that uncovers information that sources have tried to conceal.

61

inverted pyramid:

News style that puts the most important information in the first paragraph

62

hard news:

Stories about current events that have impact on people’s lives.

63

art director:

Person who designs the physical look of a film.

64

trailer:

Brief previews of coming movies shown in theaters.

65

tie-ins:

Merchandise designed after movie and television characters.

66

syndication:

syndication: to individual outlets.

67

second unit directors:

Those in charge of shooting the scenes that do not require the stars.

68

product placement:

Granting advertisers the right to show products within a production.

69

production:

The actual shooting phase of moviemaking.

70

preproduction:

The planning phase of moviemaking.

71

postproduction:

The final phase of moviemaking, which includes editing.

72

pirating:

The illegal copying and selling of film and audio recordings.

73

persistence of vision:

Illusion of movement from series of still pictures, making movies possible.

74

peep shows:

Amusement parlor boxes containing moving rolls of still pictures.

75

nickelodeon:

Small early movie theater.

76

newsreels:

Film clips, covering current events, shown in theaters.

77

Moviola:

Simple editing machine made up of two reels on which film is spooled over a small light.

78

Motion Picture Patents Company:

Company founded by Thomas Edison to control the movie equipment business.

79

line producer:

Person who leads the actual day-to-day work of making a film.

80

kinetoscope:

Early motion picture projector invented by Thomas Edison.

81

kinetograph:

Early motion picture camera invented by Thomas Edison.

82

key grip:

Member of film crew who sets up and moves cameras.

83

independent films:

Movies that are not made by one of the major studios.

84

gaffer:

Film set electrician.

85

executive producer:

Person who finds the financing for a film and puts the package together.

86

best boy:

The lighting director’s assistant.

87

director’s cut:

Version of film the director delivers to the studio.

88

docudramas:

Movies that dramatize real-life and historical events.

89

continuity supervisor:

Film crew member in charge of making sure shots match up.

90

colorizing:

Adding color to black-and-white films.

91

cinematographer:

The director of photography

92

block booking:

Forcing theater owners to show movies with unknown stars in order to get movies with established stars.

93

blind booking:

Forcing theater owners to reserve movies without previewing them.