Week 6: Intro to abdomen File Not completed: Intro to abdomen Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Week 6: Intro to abdomen File Not completed: Intro to abdomen Deck (31)
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1

Which one is recumbent and which one is upright? (L/R)

L is recumbent

R is upright

2

Why is it easier to visualize soft tissue structures in the chest and not as easy in the abdomen?

Because the chest structures are surrounded by air. In the abdomen there is less air and the margins are less visible.

 

Note: The gut (esophagus to rectum) may be seen on plain films where it contains air including: stomach (stomach bubble or magenblase), the colon (cecum to sigmoid) and the rectum. It is unusual for the small bowel (duodenum, jejunum and ileum) to contain air or gas densities.

3

4

gas shadow of ... cannot localize to a portion of the colon

4

2

gas shadow of descending colon

5

3

gas shadow of sigmoid colon and rectum

6

1

gas shadow of ascending colon

7

3

transverse colon, splenic flexure and descending colon are somewhat superimposed

8

2

haustra

9

1

semilunar folds or plicae semilunaris

10

3

Gas in descending colon

11

2

Gas in cecum

12

1

Margin of the liver

13

blue lines

Bowel gas on lateral views can rarely be localized to a portion of the colon.

It can be determined to be in the colon by the large diameter of the lumen, and by the thicker, widely spaced plicae semilunaris.

14

blue outlines

haustra

15

red arrows

Plicae semilunaris

16

yellow circle

sigmoid colon

17

red circle

feces within the bowel

18

blue line

Gas in the colon outlined on the inside wall (mucosal surface) of the colon

19

red

inner margin of the abdominal wall

20

purple

Inferior margin of the liver

21

yellow

gas in splenic flexure

Note: In an upright patient, gas will tend to collect in the hepatic and splenic flexures

Note: The splenic flexure should be the highest point of bowel gas and is often very near the hemidiaphragm

22

blue

gas in hepatic flexure

Note: In an upright patient, gas will tend to collect in the hepatic and splenic flexures

23

Green circle

magenblase (stomach bubble)

Note: identified by the rounded superior border and flat (fluid level) inferior border.

24

Gas in rectum (blue) is a marker for what measurement? (red line)

presacral space

which should be <2cm in adults

25

blue

Gas in the rectum

Note: directly anterior to sacrum

26

blue line

margin of the bladder

remember: superimposed gas shadows are in the rectum is midline. And there is not (normally) gas in the bladder.

27

blue line

thin line of fat

28

blue line

margin of the spleen

Note: spleen is sometimes clearly visible, sometimes not seen at all. The location in the left upper quadrant and basic shape help identify it.

29

red line

Splenomegally

Note: An enlarged spleen is important to identify. The location and general shape help identify this as (likely) the spleen.

30

blue

inferior pole of the kidney