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Flashcards in Work Force Safety and Wellness Deck (30)
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1
Q

Components of welling being

A
  • wellness is the quality or state of being in good health
  • a focus on wellness is important
  • components of wellness:
  • physical
  • mental
  • emotional
  • spiritual
2
Q

providers who are physically in shape:

A
  • are less likely to become injured
  • may heal better if injured
  • have a better quality of life
  • are better able to deal with mental stress
3
Q

nutrition

A
  • present day emergency medicine has access to much more information regarding current guidelines about proper nutrition
  • preplan meal
  • stay hydrated with bottled water
  • carry numerous small snacks
  • avoid fast food or high fat foods
  • consequences of poor nutrition include:
  • cardiac illness
  • type 2 diabetes
  • obesity
4
Q

smoking

A
  • schedules often conflict with the bodys circadian rhythms
  • ignoring your circadian rhythms can cause difficulty with:
  • higher thought functions
  • physical coordination
5
Q

circadian rhythms and shift work

A
  • determine you natural rhythms
  • tips for dealing with shift work:
  • avoid caffeine
  • eat health meals
  • keep a regular sleep
  • do not overlook the need for sleep
6
Q

periodic health risk assessments

A
  • hereditary factors may affect your overall health
  • consider researching your family history
  • many disease have hereditary factors
  • the most common hereditary factors are heart disease and cancer
  • build health assessments into your routine physical checkups
7
Q

body mechanics

A
  • healthcare providers are often required to lift and move a variety of patients
  • develop the following habits:
  • minimize the number of total body lifts you have to perform
  • coordinate every lift prior to performing the lift
8
Q

mental well-being

A
  • when a person is subjected to stress, the fight or flight system is activated
  • preparation on how to react is crucial
  • healthcare providers need to be in control of his or her emotions
  • plan for your behavior
9
Q

emotional well being

A
  • make a deliberate effort to create a healthy balance between life at work and life away from work
  • good healthcare providers are strong and sensitive
10
Q

stress

A
  • any event that causes us to react physically, emotionally, or mentally is considered stress
  • stress is a reaction of the body to any stressor that requires the person to adapt
  • stress is neither good nor bad
11
Q

what triggers stress

A
  • a stress response often begins with events that are perceived as threatening or demanding
  • each person needs to appraise the stress triggers in his or her life
12
Q

the physiology of acute stress

A
  • when a person perceives an event as threatening, a standard series of physiologic reactions are triggered
  • prepare us for flight or fight syndrome
  • most modern stressors are not solved by fighting or running away
13
Q

reactions to stress can be

A
  • acute
  • delayed
  • cumulative
  • stress can result in many physical and psychological symptoms
14
Q

prolonged or excessive stress is a strong contributor to:

A
  • heart disease
  • hypertension
  • cancer
  • alcoholism
  • depression
15
Q

response of providers

A
  • providers are not immune to stress
  • you will some times experience many feelings
  • these are normal, but control them on scene
  • avoid becoming irritate with a patient who does not seem ill
16
Q

coping with your own stress

A
  • early warning signs of stress
  • heart palpitations
  • rapid breathing
  • chest tightness
  • sweating
  • learn to feel yourself entering your fight or flight mode
17
Q

management techniques include

A
  • control breathing
  • progressive relaxation
  • professional assistance
  • focus on the immediate situation
  • attempt to get enough rest
18
Q

burnout

A
  • the exhaustion of physical or emotional strength
  • burnout develops because of the way a person reacts to stress
  • avoid false beliefs that can lead to burnout
19
Q

signs and symptoms of burnout

A
  • chronic fatigue and irritability
  • cynical, negative attitudes
  • emotional instability
  • changes in sleep patterns
  • overindulging
20
Q

coping with death and dying

A
  • encounters with life and death are an honor
  • a most private moment in someones life
  • births and deaths are a holy time in some cultures
  • you will help many people
  • few will be successful resuscitations
21
Q

stages of the grieving process** quiz

A
  • 5 stages of grieving include:
  • denial
  • anger
  • bargaining
  • depression
  • acceptance
22
Q

dealing with the dying patient

A
  • people who are dying generally know their situation is serious
  • let the dying patient know you understand and will talk
  • dying patients need to feel they still have some control over their life
23
Q

dealing with a grieving family

A
  • even if there is nothing you can do for the victim, the call is not over
  • do not try to hide the body
  • do not use euphemisms
  • do not hurry to clear away resuscitation equipment
  • give the family time with their loved one
  • try to arrange for further support
24
Q

dealing with a grieving child

A
  • be particularly sensitive to the emotional needs of children
  • children up to 3 years of age will be aware
  • 3 to 6 years of age believe death is temporary
  • 6 to 9 years of age may mask their feelings
  • 9 to 12 years of age may want to know details
25
Q

after the care

A
  • everyone involved in shocking situation are likely to experience some intense feelings
  • do not keep feelings inside
  • every service should have debriefing procedures
  • watch for PTSD after critical incidents
26
Q

disease transmission

A
  • you will treat and transport patients with communicable and infectious diseases
  • protective measures can dramatically minimize risk of infection
  • always practice discretion
27
Q

infectious agents are spread through transmission

A
  • food borne
  • vector borne (intermediary, animals, bugs)
  • contact transmission (direct or indirect)
  • bloodborne pathogens are spread through direct contact
  • airborne transmission
28
Q

protecting yourself

A
  • providers follows standard precautions
  • approach all body fluids as potentially infectious
  • prevention begins with personal health
  • annual examinations
  • immunizations
  • PPD screening
29
Q

personal protective equipment and practices

A
  • important infection control practices:
  • wear gloves
  • wash your hands
  • use lotions
  • use eye protection
  • consider wearing a mask
  • protect your body
  • N95 or P100 respirators
  • clean your area and equipment
  • properly dispose of sharps
  • consider wearing specialized gear
30
Q

management of an exposure

A
  • follow guidelines
  • turn over care to another provider
  • follow your department infection control plan
  • comply with all reporting requirements
  • get a medical evaluation
  • document the incident