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Flashcards in Wound Interventions and Dressings Deck (47)
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1

What are 2 types of wound debridement?

Selective debridement
Non-selective debridement

2

What is selective debridement?

Removal of ONLY non-viable tissue from a wound

3

What are three types of selective debridement?

Sharp debridement
Enzymatic debridement
Autolytic debridement

4

What is sharp debridement?

Use of a scalpel, scissors or forceps to remove non-viable tissue or debris from the wound bed

5

When is sharp debridement used?

When large amounts of thick, adherent, necrotic tissue is present

6

What is enzymatic debridement?

Application of an enzymatic preparation to necrotic tissue to remove necrotic tissue

7

When is enzymatic debridement used?

Used on infected and non-infected wounds with necrotic tissue or when autolytic debridement is not effective

8

What is autolytic debridement?

Use of the body's own mechanisms to remove nonviable tissue

9

What are 4 examples of autolytic debridement?

Use of:
Transparent films
Hydrocolloids
Hydrogels
Alginates

10

What is the purpose of autolytic debridement?

Establishes a moist wound environment that rehydrates necrotic tissue and eschar

11

When is autolytic debridement not used?

On infected wounds

12

What is non-selective debridement?

Removal of both viable and non-viable tissues from a wound

13

What are the 3 most common types of non-selective debridement?

Wet-to-dry dressings
Wound irrigation
Hydrotherapy

14

What is wet to dry dressing application?

Refers to the application of a moistened gauze dressing over an area of necrotic tissue

15

Describe the debridement process via wet to dry dressing application.

1. Apply the moistened gauze over the wound
2. Let gauze dry completely
3. Remove gauze (necrotic tissue will be adhered to gauze)

16

What is wound irrigation?

Removal of necrotic tissue from the wound bed using pressurized fluid

17

What is an example of wound irrigation?

Pulsed lavage

18

What is the most common form of hydrotherapy?

Whirlpool

19

What are 3 potential side effects of hydrotherapy?

1. Maceration of viable tissue
2. Edema from dependent LE positioning
3. Hypotension

20

What is negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT)?

Non-invasive modality that involves placing a sterile foam dressing over the wound and sealing it with an airtight secondary dressing which is attached to a vacuum pump.

21

When is negative pressure wound therapy indicated?

Indicated for wounds that cannot be closed by primary intention

22

What are 5 contraindications to using negative pressure wound therapy? (NPWT)

1. Malignancy within the wound
2. Insufficient vascularity for wound healing
3. Large amounts of necrotic tissue
4. Uncontrolled pain
5. Untreated osteomyelitis

23

What is hyperbaric oxygen?

Refers to the inhalation of 100% oxygen at a pressure greater than 1 atmosphere to reduce edema and hyper oxygenating tissue

24

When is hyperbaric oxygen indicated? (5)

Osteomyelitis
Diabetic wounds
Crush injuries
Thermal wounds
Radiation necrosis

25

What are growth factors?

Derived from naturally occurring protein factors. Promote healing by stimulating the activity of specific cell types

26

When is the use of growth factors indicated?

To treat neuropathic ulcers extending into or through subcutaneous tissue

27

When is the use of growth factors contraindicated?

Contraindicated for wounds closed by primary intention

28

What is the difference between primary and secondary dressings?

Primary = dressings that come in direct contact with the wound

Secondary = dressings that are placed directly over the primary dressing for protection/absorption etc.

29

What are 6 types of wound dressings?

Alginates
Foam Dressings
Gauze
Hydrocolloids
Hydrogels
Transparent films

30

What are alginates?

Dressings derived from seaweed extraction that create a hydrophilic gel and are highly absorptive but highly permeable