Assessing Students Learning for Language 1 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Assessing Students Learning for Language 1 Deck (69):
1

Language for learning describes ________ language level

DEVELOPMENTAL

2

Think of this stage as an early development

children are *learning* language- they learn through exploration

3

Later in life, kids learn about the world through _________

language
-why we call it language for learning stage

4

In order to be successful in school, children need to understand and use ______ ________ language

*higher level*

5

Children in the learning for language stage have:

1. mastered basic vocab
2. mastered sentence structures and function of their language
*have trouble with higher levels of language performance tho*

6

Learning for language age range

normal 5-12 age. older can be presented.

7

L4l:

Learning for Language stage

8

LFL is where children really start to get identified

whereas they weren't earlier

9

decontextualized methods for assessing syntax and morphology include the

1. judgement tasks
2. compliance
3. picture pointing

10

Quick incidental learning refers to learning

New vocabulary

11

Children in the language for learning stage usually persist with a wide range of phonological errors in their speech (t/f)

FALSE

12

if a child passess a standardized (decontextualized) vocab assessment, there is no reason to probe vocab further (t/f)

TRUE

13

The following are good ways to encourage teachers to refer children who may need to be evaluated for a language disorder:

1. provide inservices
2. ask them to describe behaviors of struggling students
3. provide them with a questionnaire targeting language-based problems

14

Parents are required to attend at least one assessment session when their child is being evaluated for a speech or language disorder in the public school (t/f)

FALSE

15

Fam involvement is tricky if you see children in the school

easier in the clinic bec have access to parent each visit. what's good about school is you see kid 3 times a week

16

When children are seen at school...

1. parents can miss out
2. seems more pertinent to consider teacher's perspective in challenges in academic environment-meeting academic/linguistic/lang based challenges

17

FAMILY PERSPECTIVIES SHOULD ALWAYS BE INCLUDED

1. kid can't be assessed w/o family's permission
2. you can access child w/o parents present as long as theyve signed consent
3. once referral is made to slp, fam needs to be contacted to discuss it and get their perspecitives
4. from that point on, contact w/ fam should happen at each step.

18

Caregivers should be invited to:

join any assessment session and contribute
-all the way through development of IEP

19

IEP

individualized education plan; official document stating strengths and needs, goals, interventionists

20

Student/CHild l4l stage

should have voice and be informed/SHOULD BE INVOLVED if over age 5
-ask "do you like your school?"
"what do you like to do"
-see if child has good awareneness-gives good convo sample

21

With student talk about:

1. what to expect
2. answer their questions
3. ask student to talk ab troubles/strengths in school; what student would like to improve
4. discussion can provide convo sample as well as info for planning assessment!!!!

22

identifying students at-risk:

1. screening
2. rti
3. inservices (teacher education)

23

SCREENING

usually at kindergarten-ones given before are language intensive

24

problem w/ kidnergarten screenings

biased against kids w/ lang. differences-test would withold child from diff culture by putting them in developmental preschool

25

screening tests are notorious for missing language differences!

ask parents if child understands things- does he understand you at home?

26

Putting children where eng isn't first language in a developmental classroom

PREVENTS them from getting education that is best suited for them

27

Children from diverse backgrounds

parents should be queried to determine if they believe there are lang problems
-screenings over-identify problems!

28

RTI

response to intervention, referral, case finding
-teachers often refer

29

RTI

used to get students extra help in classroom and if prognosis is not adequate-child is referred for a full evaluation

30

teachers may not realize..

language plays critical role in child's literacy development ora bility to follow instructions because the child "sounds normal" so slp needs to be involved

31

slp may not be included in early rti because

teacher doesn't know..we would prob have direct contact after tiers 1 and 2
-point of rti is to help them before they fail

32

inservices

when we educate teachers
-educate them on what to look for in kids who may have a language learning disability
-rovide w/ questionnaire, tease out potential probs

33

Evaluation

1. standardized tests
2. criterion-referenced

34

Why do we do standardized test?

1. eligibility: dont give much info about what student actually needs
2. most schools require scoring below a certain criteria on tests/subtests of comprehensive or global assessments.
-this could be so arbitrary

35

Many kids w/ language learning disabilities have ______ deficits

pragmatic!
-want to spend time in real convo and that's difficult to get with standardized assessments
-there are few that can be used for eligibioty. they can be used to qualify a student but won't tell you very much about what exactly needs to be done

36

Once eligibility is established, we can look for baseline and identify targets for intervention through a __________ ___________ assessment

criterion referenced!!
-more neuonced, tease out things that aren't quite right-gives you a baseline

37

Phonology

1. assessments
2. types of tasks: use nonsense words, rapid automated naming

38

Most kids in this developmental range will not have a large number of ___________ errors

phonological

39

Children with language learning disability will have difficulty w/ ________ demanding tasks

phonologically!!
-like producing complex unfamiliar words and phrases --> can't rehearse/use new vocab for academic puposes

40

Phonological skills are critical for

literacy development! kids have trouble when words are unknown
-if you can't decode word then how is it going to sit in your memory long enough to attach meaning

41

few tests look at phonology

1. nonword repitition-common
2. some give phonological awareness assessment

42

You can also look at higher level of phonological skills through a task called _________

Rapid Automated Naming
-descriminate kids w/ phon. problems
-students are asked to name common objects
-or they can produce overlearned series (months, days of week) - info is supposed to discriminate good and poor readers
-kids that have prob with this suggests a phonological problem

43

Semantics

1. receptive vocab
2. expressive vocab

44

receptive vocab

1. standardized
2. instructional vocab.
3. textbook vocab

45

Expressive vocab

1. lexical diversity
2. word retreival
3. quick incidental learning (fast mapping)
4. semantic relations between clauses

46

Receptive vocab: standardized (decontextualized assessment)

picture pointing is usually how it's tested
-once deficit in this area, we should further probe vocab necessary for child to succeed
-if child doesn't have difficulty w/ this task and have normal vocab, you should NOT try doing criterion because standardized is the hardest/no context and they've mastered it

47

Receptive: Instructional vocabulary

classroom vocabulary
-observe in the class
-spatial, temporal (order of things like before and after) vocab
-what kinds of directions does the teacher give? name on paper, get out books, trn to page, # your paper vertically, -kid labels them as bad kid bec don't follow directions

48

Receptive: textbook vocab

many have vocab section, do in standardized manner or have them read sentence that contains the vocab word and give context

49

2 components to focus on with expressive vocabulary

lexical diversity and word retreival

50

lexical diversity; receptive

ability to use flexible but precise vocab (large vocab ppl communicate more efficiently)

51

how to measure lexical diversity

Type Token Ratio: count total # of words and divide by number of different words- problem is that kids w/ sli do not differ significanlty on this measure

52

Type token ratio/tests lexical diversity

speech sample of number of diff words and number of total-more sensitive to differences even using various sizes, lots of words to describe things
-# of diff words = type
-# of total words = token

53

Word retrieval; receptive

very common in students w/ LLD- see if the score much higher on receptive than expressive- if problem then assess w/ standardized

54

What if kid doesn't know word at all or just couldn't retreive it?

if they do fine on receptive and horrible on expressive that means they have a big vocab but can't say the word

55

Quick incidental learning: receptive

fast mapping; how do you present it to them; can they get it in context- how fast they're able to learn
-ability to acquire new words quickly w/o being explicitly taught the word; just brief exposure

56

semantic relations between clauses; receptive

as kids language develop, begin to use sentences that contain more than one proposition or main idea
-if child is trying to express more than one idea in an utterance then they are showing readiness to learn complex syntax

57

ex of semantic relations between clauses

1. eat dinner and go outside; temporal or conditional- if i eat dinner i can go outside
-if child says "eat dinner go outside" they're showing readiness to get the semanti crelations between clause-they're showing cognitively they'r ready to go to to that next step

58

Syntax and morphology

1. receptive (complex sentences, standardized tests, criterion reference, contextualized and decontextualized)
2. expressive

59

Sometimes kids produce sentence forms even when they fail to perform correctly on comp tests where nonlinguistic cues have been removed

they produce it but don't understand it

60

Children w/ LLD are often delayed in:

understanding complex sentences found in school reading material
-teaching area of oral language can greatly impact literacy development

61

Having probs in oral language impacts what area

literacy development

62

Ex of complex sentence probs:

1. passive: dog was bitten by the child-difficult
2. embedded clauses: the man who wears suspenders fell down
3. adverbial conjunction- before you go outside, clean your room

63

How to assess syntax and morphology receptively

standardized tests: if do well, stop here.
-if below normal use criterion referenced decontextualized
-if still not well, scaffold/give context

64

how to assess syntax and morphology receptively

criterion referenced contextualized; if they can use cues

65

why is criterion referenced contextualized important

its a way to help them improve immediately in the class;

66

if child does not do better w/ contextualized cues, intervention needs to be more

clinician directed; harder; tends to show better evidence is clinician directed therapy to directlyt each comprehension of sentences

67

Criterion referenced methods for assessing receptive syntax and morphology

decontextualized: picture pointing, behavioral compliznce (they do what you ask them to do)
-judgement: present series of sentences and have student tell whether each is ok or silly
-judgement decontextualized: say sentence out of blue and ask if correct/incorrect
-judgement contextualized; start using order

68

see if you can use context if the decontextualized task failed

probable order of event: boy ate the dog
-order of mention: go to store then go to car

69

testing expressive syntax and morphology

look at standardized to see if child is performing differently
*spontaneous speech sampling* gives good picture of what child is actually doing
best way to see expressive is language sample