Barron's words List 2 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Barron's words List 2 Deck (50)
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1

vivisection

noun

dissection, surgery, or painful experiments performed on a living animal for the purpose of scientific research

The book Animal Rights by the philosopher Tom Regan contains a long discussion of vivisection.

2

petulant

adjective

rude; peevish

The boy's father worried that his disobedient and petulant child would grow up to be a bitter and annoying man.

3

visage

noun

countenance; appearance; aspect

The infant studied its mother's visage intently.

4

vogue

noun

prevailing fashion or practice

Although protectionist policies are not in vogue today, great capitalist democracies, such as Great Britain and the United States, flourished for long periods of their histories under protectionist trade policies that were nearly mercantilist–policies that imposed high tariffs on many foreign goods to promote domestic production.

5

itinerant

adjective

wandering from place to place; unsettled

According to state law, companies hiring itinerant workers must provide adequate housing for them.

6

profound

adjective

deep; not superficial

There is an adage in philosophy that everyone is born either a Platonist or an *Aristotelian, meaning that everyone has a predisposition to believing either that reality is completely “here and now,” or that there exists a more profound, hidden reality.

The noun profundity means the quality of being profound.

7

tenet

noun

belief; doctrine

In his novel Walden II, the psychologist B. F. Skinner depicts a brave new world based on the tenets of a behavioral psychology that frees human beings from the inhibitions and preconceptions of traditional society.

8

cornucopia

noun

horn overflowing with fruit and grain; state of abundance

The U.S. economy has produced a cornucopia of employment opportunities.

9

stricture

noun

something that restrains; negative criticism

As professionals, lawyers are expected to abide by a set of ethical strictures in their practice of the law.

10

primordial

adjective

original; existing from the beginning

Scholars are divided as to whether polytheism represents a degeneration from a primordial monotheism, or was a precursor to a more sophisticated view, monotheism.

11

complement

noun

something that completes or makes up a whole

Some people envision chess developing into a game played at the highest levels between teams of humans and computers, each complementing the other and providing investigators with insight into the cognitive processes of each.

12

qualm

noun

sudden feeling of faintness or nausea; uneasy feeling about the rightness of actions

The judge had no qualms about sentencing the thief to five years imprisonment.

13

dearth

noun

scarcity

In his book The Affluent Society, published in 1958, the economist J. K. Galbraith pointed out that in America affluence is located disproportionately in the private sector, leaving a dearth of resources available for the public sector.

14

raconteur

noun

witty, skillful storyteller

Former president Bill Clinton is known as an accomplished raconteur who can entertain guests with amusing anecdotes about politics all evening.

15

behemoth

noun

huge creature; anything very large and powerful

In the 1980s and 1990s, the trend in American business was toward increased privatization of government industries (such as power generation), partly because it was believed that private industry is more efficient and partly because foreign private companies were becoming commercial behemoths, outstripping government- owned companies in competitiveness.

16

deterrent

noun

something that discourages or hinders

During the Cold War, the United States maintained a large number of nuclear weapons as a deterrent to aggression by the Soviet Union and its allies.

17

concoct

verb

to invent

The various human cultures have concocted a great many explanations to describe the beginning of the Earth, life, and humanity.

18

stultify

verb

to impair or reduce to uselessness

The professor of education believes that over reliance on rote learning stultifies students' creativity.

19

fissure

noun

crevice

Geologists measure the width of the fissure regularly to monitor movement of the Earth's plates in the area.

20

converge

verb

to approach; come together; tend to meet

Although the People's Republic of China and India are rivals in many ways, in certain areas their interests converge.

21

incarnate

adjective

having bodily form

22

pellucid

adjective

transparent; translucent; easily understood

Two writers often mentioned as having an admirably pellucid style are Bertrand Russell and George Orwell.

23

servile

adjective

submissive; obedient

None of the dictator's servile citizens dared question his decree.

24

olfactory

adjective

concerning the sense of smell

Wine connoisseurs say that the olfactory senses play as important a part in appreciating good wine as the sense of taste.

25

torque

noun

a turning or twisting force; the moment of a force; the measure of a force's tendency to produce twisting or turning and rotation around an axis

Internal combustion engines produce useful torque over a rather circumscribed range of rotational speeds (normally from about 1,000 rpm to 6,000 rpm.)

26

daunt

verb

to discourage; intimidate; dishearten

Do not let the difficulty of learning the 800 words in Essential Words for the GRE daunt you.

Daunting is an adjective that means discouraging or disheartening.

Earning a Ph.D. is a daunting task, but it can be done.

The adjective dauntless means fearless.

27

execrable

adjective

detestable; abhorrent

When folk artists such as Bob Dylan began to use rock instruments, many folk music traditionalists considered it an execrable travesty.

28

equable

adjective

steady; unvarying; serene

Throughout the crisis the president remained equable.

Do not confuse equable with equitable, which means fair, or just, or impartial.

Much of modern economic history can be seen as a dialectic between advocates of laissez-faire policies, who want to leave the market free to create wealth untrammeled by restrictions (believing it will “trickle down” to all members of the society), and exponents of redistribution of wealth, who want to ensure that the fruits of capitalism are shared equitably.

29

harrowing

adjective

extremely distressing; terrifying

The journey “inward” to explore the unconscious mind has been described as more harrowing than the most dangerous voyage to explore the Earth.

30

copious

adjective

abundant; plentiful

The copious rainfall was welcomed by farmers in the parched land.