Basic Group 11 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Basic Group 11 Deck (290):
1

astounding

surprisingly impressive or notable

2

engulf

(of a natural force) sweep over (something) so as to surround or cover it completely (e.g. the shop was engulfed in flames/flood) OR powerfully affect (someone); overwhelm (e.g. he was engulfed by anxiety)

3

tribute

an act, statement, or gift that is intended to show gratitude, respect, or admiration (e.g. the video is a tribute to the ANZAC soldiers) OR something resulting from a particular quality or feature and indicating its worth (e.g. his success is a tribute to his effort) OR denoting or relating to a group or musician that performs the music of a more famous one and typically imitates them in appearance and style of performance (e.g. a tribute band; a tribute performance)

4

inundate

overwhelm (someone) with things or people to be dealt with (e.g. The school is inundated with all these requests) OR flood(ed) (e.g. Approximately 20,000 homes were inundated in Brisbane in 2011)

5

dismantle

take (a machine or structure) to pieces (e.g. the river walk was dismantled by the fury flood)

6

anchor

a heavy object attached to a cable or chain and used to moor a ship to the sea bottom, typically having a metal shank with a pair of curved, barbed flukes at one end (e.g. the ship has lost its anchor and is destined to float on the undulating ocean forever) OR a person or thing which provides stability or confidence in an otherwise uncertain situation (e.g. the capital cities of Australia are deemed to be the anchors of Australia’s growth)

7

bred

(of a person or animal) reared in a specified environment or way (e.g. she was filled with terror to see the countryside as a city-bred girl)

8

reared

bring up and care for (a child) until they are fully grown; (of plants) cultivated (e.g. he was reared in the city) OR (of a horse or other animal) raise itself upright on its hind legs (e.g. the horse reared in terror)

9

hind

(especially of a bodily part) situated at the back; posterior

10

posterior

chiefly in Anatomy, further back in position; of or nearer the rear or hind end

11

barbed

having a barb or barbs

12

barb

a sharp projection near the end of an arrow, fish hook, or similar object, which is angled away from the main point so as to make extraction difficult

13

fluke

an unlikely chance occurrence, especially a surprising piece of luck (e.g. their victory was a fluke) (verb: achieve (something) by luck rather than skill)

14

shank

a person's leg, especially the part from the knee to the ankle; the lower part of an animal’s leg OR the stem or shaft of a tool, implement in particular a long, narrow part of a tool connecting the handle to the operational end/he straight part of a fish hook

15

shaft

a long, narrow part or section forming the handle of a tool or club, the body of a spear or arrow, or similar OR a ray of light or bolt of lightning (e.g. a shaft of sunlight shone into the room upon dawn) OR a long, narrow, typically vertical hole that gives access to a mine, accommodates a lift in a building, or provides ventilation

16

stem

the main body or stalk of a plant or shrub, typically rising above ground but occasionally subterranean OR a long, thin supportive or main section of something

17

implement

a tool, utensil, or other piece of equipment that is used for a particular purpose (e.g. garden implements)

18

stalk

a slender support or stem of an object

19

slender

(of a person or part of the body) gracefully thin OR (especially of a rod or stem) of small girth or breadth (e.g. the stems of most plants are slender)

20

girth

the measurement around the middle of something, especially a person's waist OR a band attached to a saddle and fastened around a horse's belly to keep the saddle in place

21

obstinate

stubbornly refusing to change one's opinion or chosen course of action, despite attempts to persuade one to do so OR (of an unwelcome situation) very difficult to change or overcome (e.g. the obstinate situation of unemployment)

22

perpetuate

make (something) continue indefinitely (e.g. a monument to perpetuate the memory of those killed in the war) (e.g. the building was perpetually kept through maintenance)

23

implore

beg someone earnestly or desperately to do something

24

perpetual

never ending or changing (e.g. perpetual darkness) OR occurring repeatedly; so frequent as to seem endless and uninterrupted (e.g. perpetual floods) OR (of a plant) blooming or fruiting several times in one season (e.g. perpetual plants sure are nice)

25

earnestly

with sincere; seriously (e.g. he made the request earnestly)

26

entail

involve (something) as a necessary or inevitable part or consequence (e.g. a situation which entails considerable risks)

27

enunciate

say or pronounce clearly (e.g. she enunciated the words slowly) OR express (a proposition, theory, etc.) in clear or definite terms (e.g. a document that elaborately explains the potential risks entailed)

28

ennui

a feeling of listlessness and dissatisfaction arising from a lack of occupation or excitement

29

listless

(of a person or their manner) lacking energy or enthusiasm (e.g. teenagers these days are listless)

30

succumb

fail to resist pressure, temptation, or some other negative force (e.g. we cannot merely give up and succumb to despair.) OR die from the effect of a disease or injury (e.g. the patient succumbed from the pandemic disease)

31

timorous

showing or suffering from nervousness or a lack of confidence (e.g. I was extremely timorous when I did the presentation)

32

tirade

a long, angry speech of criticism or accusation (e.g. the tirade condemns the committers of the prevalent issue of domestic violence)

33

commit

perpetrate or carry out (a mistake, crime, or immoral act) OR pledge or bind (a person or an organization) to a certain course or policy (e.g. the communist government was reluctant to commit themselves to a democracy) OR (be committed to) be dedicated to (something) (e.g. we are committed to fulfilling customers' needs) OR pledge or set aside (resources) for future use (e.g. the company must commit a large fund to ensure its prosperity)

34

torpid

mentally or physically inactive; lethargic

35

lethargy

a lack of energy and enthusiasm (e.g. teenagers those days are filled with lethargy)

36

accede

agree to a demand, request, or treaty (e.g. the company acceded to the request)

37

clandestine

kept secret or done secretively, especially because illicit (e.g. the meetings were kept clandestine)

38

illicit

forbidden by law, rules, or custom

39

disseminate

spread (something, especially information) widely (e.g. Apple attracts a large amount of customers even without having to disseminate)

40

incoherent

(of spoken or written language) expressed in an incomprehensible or confusing way; unclear; unable to speak intelligibly (e.g. his speech was incoherent) OR not logical or internally consistent (e.g. the pattern is incoherent)

41

perspicacious

having a ready insight into and understanding of things (e.g. all news reporters are perspicacious)

42

conjecture

an opinion or conclusion formed on the basis of incomplete information (e.g. the conjecture of the report is provisional only) (verb: form an opinion or supposition about (something) on the basis of incomplete information)

43

quagmire

an awkward, complex, or hazardous situation (e.g. a financial quagmire for the company) OR a soft boggy area of land that gives way underfoot

44

preclude

prevent from happening; make impossible (e.g. his disabilities precluded him from being a soccer player)

45

innocuous

not harmful or offensive (e.g. the remarks were intended as a joke and are innocuous)

46

beseech

ask someone urgently and fervently (beg) to do or give something (e.g. we beseeched Min Jae to stay)

47

fervent

having or displaying a passionate intensity (e.g. he is fervent in studying)

48

disparity

a great difference (e.g. the disparities of crops between northern and souther India)

49

pontificate

express one's opinions in a pompous and dogmatic way (e.g. he was pontificating about the significance of financial commitment)

50

dogmatic

inclined to lay down principles as undeniably true (arrogant attitudes on unproved theories) (e.g. she was dogmatic that her interpretation was correct)

51

pompous

affectedly grand, solemn, or self-important (e.g. he is often arrogant and pompous)

52

malaise

a general feeling of discomfort, illness, or unease whose exact cause is difficult to identify (e.g. I could feel the malaise aroma around me)

53

magnanimous

generous or forgiving, especially towards a rival or less powerful person (e.g. we are magnanimous to failure and we deem failure as a lesson)

54

exacerbate

make (a problem, bad situation, or negative feeling) worse (e.g. rising inflation was exacerbated by the collapse of oil prices)

55

diurnal

opposite of nocturnal

56

narcissism

excessive interest in or admiration of oneself and one's physical appearance (e.g. narcissism is widely deemed as a mental issue)

57

obtuse

annoyingly insensitive or slow to understand (e.g. we have no time left! we can't afford to be obtuse) OR difficult to understand, especially deliberately so (e.g. why use poems which are obtuse and difficult to interpret when you could use explicit language?)

58

hackneyed

(of a phrase or idea) having been overused; unoriginal and trite (e.g. hackneyed memes)

59

meandering (adj)

following a winding course (e.g. meandering river) OR proceeding in a convoluted or undirected fashion (e.g. a meandering debate)

60

discourse

written or spoken communication or debate (e.g. she enjoyed the discourse with her peers) OR verb: speak or write authoritatively about a topic (e.g. she is able to discourse on computer sciences for hours) OR engage in conversation (e.g. he spent hours discoursing with his supporters)

61

winding

a twisting movement or course (e.g. the windings of the stream)

62

chronic

(of an illness) persisting for a long time or constantly recurring (e.g. a chronic disease that plagued him for years)

63

acute

(of an unpleasant or unwelcome situation or phenomenon) present or experienced to a severe or intense degree (e.g. housing shortage is acute in Brisbane and will get worse if nothing is done) OR (of a disease or its symptoms) severe but of short duration (contrast with chronic) OR having or showing a perceptive understanding or insight; shrewd OR (of a physical sense or faculty) highly developed; keen (e.g. acute acoustic sense)

64

insurgent

a person fighting against a government or invading force; a rebel or revolutionary (e.g. the government capitulated to the attacks from insurgents)

65

elusive

difficult to find, catch, or achieve (e.g. success will become ever more elusive)

66

enigmatic

difficult to interpret or understand; mysterious (e.g. an enigmatic plan)

67

skirt (verb)

go round or past the edge of; attempt to ignore; avoid dealing with (e.g. I made a blunder attempting to skirt my presentation by deliberately missing school)

68

urbane

(of a person, especially a man) courteous and refined in manner (an urbane gentleman)

69

parsimonious

very unwilling to spend money or use resources (e.g. sometimes my stepdad can be a bit parsimonious)

70

patronising

treat with an apparent kindness which betrays a feeling of superiority; condescending

71

condescending

having or showing an attitude of patronising superiority (e.g. I thought the teacher was condescending)

72

sentiment

a view or opinion that is held or expressed; general feeling or opinion (e.g. I agree with your sentiment; racist sentiment) OR a feeling or emotion (e.g. intense sentiment of horror) OR exaggerated and self-indulgent feelings of tenderness, sadness, or nostalgia (e.g. many of the appeals are of exaggerated and self indulgent sentiments)

73

immutable

unchanging over time or unable to be changed (e.g. an immutable prejudiced belief; immutable fact)

74

ignominious

deserving or causing public disgrace or shame (e.g. Kevin Rudd risked an ignominious bet with Julia Gillard)

75

cognisant (adj)

having knowledge or awareness (e.g. by Year 9, you must be cognisant of the fundamentals of chemistry)

76

banal

so lacking in originality as to be obvious and boring (e.g. a banal poem that brings dismal emotions)

77

tentative

not certain or fixed; provisional (e.g. a tentative report) OR done without confidence; hesitant (e.g. his presentation was tentative but at least he tried)

78

indefatigable

(of a person or their efforts) persisting tirelessly (e.g. he aspires to become a pilot and is working indefatigably towards his goal)

79

edify

instruct or improve (someone) morally or intellectually (noun is edification) (e.g. the video was filmed for the edification of the viewers) (e.g. the client demands the video to be edifying)

80

opulence

great wealth or luxuriousness (e.g. the mansion was sheer opulence)

81

austerity

sternness or severity of manner or attitude

82

stern

(of a person or their manner) serious and unrelenting, especially in the assertion of authority and exercise of discipline (e.g. the staffs' face were stern) OR (of an act or statement) strict and severe (e.g. the stern assertion made by the premier reveals the state's serious approach to the issue) OR (of competition or opposition) putting someone or something under extreme pressure (e.g. the HAST is indeed a stern test of student's academic ability)

83

desiccate

(usu. as adj. desiccated) remove the moisture from (something), typically in order to preserve it (e.g. desiccated apples) OR lacking interest, passion, or energy (e.g. a desiccating lesson)

84

cursory

hasty and therefore not thorough or detailed (e.g. I am obligate to write a cursorily written essay in the test) given the short time

85

hasty

done with excessive speed or urgency; hurried

86

compunction

a feeling of guilt or moral scruple that prevents or follows the doing of something bad (e.g. compunction prevented many robberies)

87

moral scruple

a feeling of doubt or hesitation with regard to the morality or propriety of a course of action

88

propriety

conformity to conventionally accepted standards of behaviour or morals (e.g. his behaviours never show propriety)

89

pejorative

expressing contempt or disapproval (expressing contempt or disapproval) (e.g. the pejorative remarks had exacerbated the feuds between the two tribes)

90

deprecate (verb)

express disapproval of (e.g. the teacher deprecates inappropriate behaviours in her class); another term for depreciate

91

pamper

indulge with every attention, comfort, and kindness; spoil (e.g. Miss Hawke pampered and cared about all students)

92

scold

remonstrate with or rebuke (someone) angrily (e.g. the government was scolded for the waste of tax payer's money) (e.g. Yannick was scolded for his unacceptable behaviours)

93

remonstrate

make a forcefully reproachful protest (e.g. insurgents remonstrated as an attempt to promote welfares)

94

reproach

express to (someone) one's disapproval of or disappointment in their actions (e.g. the teacher reproached the performers regarding the performance) (e.g. she gave a reproachful look)

95

rebuke

express sharp disapproval or criticism of (someone) because of their behaviour or actions (e.g. Yannick was rebuked for his unacceptable behaviours)

96

collusion

secret or illegal cooperation or conspiracy in order to deceive others [in collusion with] (e.g. the dark organisation bribed the government to work in collusion with the arm force)

97

ardent

very enthusiastic or passionate (e.g. he has a special incentive that makes him ardent towards soccer)

98

lambaste

criticise (someone or something) harshly (e.g. they lambasted the report as a gross distortion of the truth)

99

pittance

a very small or inadequate amount of money (e.g. the paid may seem decent to some but the workers were in fact paid a pittance given the harsh conditions)

100

incontrovertible

not able to be denied or disputed (e.g. a incontrovertible deduction)

101

opaque

not transparent

102

mitigate

make (something bad) less severe, serious, or painful (e.g. the problem was mitigated through funding)

103

propinquity

the state of being close to someone or something; proximity (e.g. propinquity to CBD and shopping precincts)

104

effrontery

insolent or impertinent behaviour

105

insolent

showing a rude and arrogant lack of respect

106

impertinent

not showing proper respect; rude

107

anachronism (noun)

a thing belonging or appropriate to a period other than that in which it exists, especially a thing that is conspicuously old-fashioned (e.g. the cottage is a true anachronism that has survived centuries)

108

skulduggery

underhand, unscrupulous, or dishonest behaviour or activities (e.g. skulduggery drug deals)

109

underhand

acting or done in a secret or dishonest way (e.g. underhand dealing)

110

unscrupulous

having or showing no moral principles; not honest or fair (e.g. unscrupulous landlords might be tempted to harass existing tenants)

111

mercurial

subject to sudden or unpredictable changes of mood or mind (e.g. he is a mercurial man)

112

temperament

a person's or animal's nature, especially as it permanently affects their behaviour (e.g. she had an artistic temperament) OR the tendency to behave angrily or emotionally (e.g. he is beginning to show ungovernable temperament)

113

inexorable

impossible to stop or prevent (e.g. the seemingly inexorable approach of new technologies is life-changing)

114

elucidate

make (something) clear; explain (e.g. there is no need for further elucidation)

115

fledgling

a young bird that has just fledged

116

fledged

(of a young bird) having wing feathers that are large enough for flight; able to fly)

117

apocryphal

(of a story or statement) of doubtful authenticity, although widely circulated as being true (e.g. the apocryphal rumour is widely believed)

118

sycophant

a person who acts obsequiously towards someone important in order to gain advantage

119

obsequiously

obedient or attentive to an excessive or servile degree

120

enmity

a state or feeling of active opposition or hostility (e.g. enmities between Android and iOS)

121

sanguine

optimistic or positive, especially in an apparently bad or difficult situations (e.g. he is sanguine about prospects for the global economy)

122

expedite

make (an action or process) happen sooner or be accomplished more quickly (e.g. the premier promises to expedite the construction of the tunnel)

123

sagacious

having or showing keen mental discernment and good judgement; wise or shrewd (e.g. they were sagacious and astute enough to avoid dark alleyways)

124

shrewd

having or showing sharp powers of judgement; astute

125

clemency

mercy; lenience

126

lenience

the fact or quality of being more merciful or tolerant than expected; clemency

127

charlatan

a person falsely claiming to have a special knowledge or skill

128

fastidious

very attentive to and concerned about accuracy and detail (e.g. he is a perfectionist and is fastidious about the work)

129

conjure

cause (a spirit or ghost) to appear by means of a magic ritual OR make (something) appear unexpectedly or seemingly from nowhere OR call (an image) to the mind (e.g. I can't conjure Pikachu's face)

130

animosity

strong hostility (e.g. dogs are intelligent, once you are familiar with them they no longer show animosity toward you)

131

deleterious

causing harm or damage (e.g. anxiety has a deleterious impact on his life)

132

estrange

cause (someone) to be no longer on friendly terms with someone [estranged from…] (e.g. he became estranged from his father)

133

prudent

acting with or showing care and thought for the future (e.g. the former Labor government is deemed much more prudent than the current government)

134

culpable

deserving blame (e.g. the culprit is culpable)

135

exculpate

show or declare that (someone) is not guilty of wrongdoing (e.g. the article exculpates Apple)

136

chicanery

the use of deception or subterfuge to achieve one's purpose (e.g. chicaneries are wicked behaviours)

137

subterfuge

deceit used in order to achieve one's goal (e.g. he had to use subterfuge and bluff on many occasions)

138

denounce

publicly declare to be wrong or evil (e.g. violences were denounced in the talk)

139

catharsis

the process of releasing, and thereby providing relief from, strong or repressed emotions (e.g. music is a mean of catharsis)

140

repressed

restrained or oppressed (e.g. indigenous communities are being repressed against) OR (of a thought or desire) kept suppressed and unconscious in one's mind (e.g. it wasn't until now that I realised my repressed desire to study)

141

eloquent

fluent or persuasive in speaking or writing (e.g. an eloquent essay/speech) OR clearly expressing or indicating something (e.g. the bus journey alone is eloquent of inequality)

142

auspicious

conducive to success; favourable OR giving or being a sign of future success (e.g. an auspicious step)

143

conducive (adj)

a certain situation or outcome likely or possible (conducive to) (e.g. the great effort committed is conducive to success)

144

increment

an increase or addition, especially one of a series on a fixed scale

145

pervade

(especially of a smell) spread through and be perceived in every part of (e.g. a smell of stale cabbage pervaded the air)

146

naive

(of a person or action) showing a lack of experience, wisdom, or judgement OR (of a person) natural and unaffected; innocent (e.g. all kids are innocent and naive)

147

wisdom

the quality of having experience, knowledge, and good judgement; the quality of being wise OR the fact of being based on sensible or wise thinking (e.g. some question the wisdom of spending billions on the construction of a dam in an area prone to earthquake) OR the body of knowledge and experience that develops within a specified society or period

148

nonchalant

(of a person or manner) feeling or appearing casually calm and relaxed; not displaying anxiety, interest, or enthusiasm (e.g. she always seem to be nonchalant)

149

noxious

harmful, poisonous, or very unpleasant (e.g. Paris is notorious for its noxious aroma)

150

indignant (adj)

feeling or showing anger or annoyance at what is perceived as unfair treatment (e.g. he was indignant at being the object of suspicion)

151

ordinance

an authoritative order

152

tyranny

cruel and oppressive government or rule OR a state under cruel and oppressive government (e.g. North Korea is a tyranny) OR cruel, unreasonable, or arbitrary use of power or control

153

recede

go or move back or further away from a previous position (e.g. the floodwaters had receded | his footsteps receded down back the river) OR (of a quality, feeling, or possibility) gradually diminish (e.g. the prospects of an early end to the war receded)

154

wad

a mass or lump of a soft material, used for padding, stuffing, or wiping

155

relapse

deteriorate after a period of improvement (e.g. the property prices are relapsing back to the level a decade ago) OR return to (a less active or a worse state) (e.g. he relapsed into silence)

156

deteriorate

become progressively worse (e.g. relations between the countries had deteriorated sharply)

157

regress

return to a former or less developed state OR return mentally to a former stage of life or a supposed previous life, especially through hypnosis

158

alleviate

make (suffering, deficiency, or a problem) less severe

159

mocking

making fun of someone or something in a cruel way; derisive

160

derisive (adj)

expressing contempt or ridicule (e.g. he gave a harsh, derisive laugh)

161

mournfully

feeling, expressing, or inducing sadness, regret, or grief

162

deviate

depart from an established course (deviate from) (e.g. Apple should deviate from the conventional technologies and introduce true innovations) (e.g. you must not deviate from the agreed route)

163

opulent

ostentatiously costly and luxurious

164

ostentatiously

characterized by pretentious or showy display; designed to impress (e.g. a simple design that is glamorous without being ostentatious.)

165

insubordination

defiance of authority; refusal to obey orders (e.g. he was dismissed for insubordination)

166

veer

change direction suddenly (e.g. the ship veered off the route) OR suddenly change an opinion, subject, type of behaviour, etc. (e.g. the conversation eventually veered away from) (e.g. he had been motivated to veer off his gaming career and put emphasise in studying to secure a bright future)

167

impetus

the force or energy with which a body moves (e.g. hit the booster coil before the flywheel loses all its impetus) OR something that makes a process or activity happen or happen more quickly (e.g. the inception of democracy has given off impetus to a nation with no indignation)

168

curtail

reduce in extent or quantity; impose a restriction on (e.g. the iOS 8 update had been curtailed due to refrained time)

169

malevolent

having or showing a wish to do evil to others (e.g. malevolent grin)

170

besiege

surround (a place) with armed forces in order to capture it or force its surrender (e.g. the city has been besieged by arm forces) OR surround and harass (e.g. she was besieged by news reporters and had lodged an request to have them apprehended) OR (be besieged) be inundated by large numbers of requests or complaints (e.g. the government is besieged with thousands of complaints everyday)

171

careen

(of a ship) tilt; lean over

172

detour

a long or roundabout route that is taken to avoid something or to visit somewhere along the way (e.g. he had made a detour to a cafe) (verb: take a long or roundabout route) (e.g. I took a detour around the road to avoid the traffic)

173

rasp

a harsh, grating noise (e.g. the rasp of the aircraft engine) (verb: make a harsh, grating noise (e.g. his breath rasped in his throat) OR say in a harsh, grating voice) (e.g. "Stop it!" he rasped)

174

grating

sounding harsh and unpleasant (e.g. her high, grating voice) OR irritating (e.g. he is a grating man)

175

treacherous

guilty of or involving betrayal or deception OR (of ground, water, conditions, etc.) presenting hidden or unpredictable dangers (e.g. the treacherous dangers entailed with the trip) (e.g. treacherous floods)

176

mollify

appease the anger or anxiety of (someone) (e.g. the tiger was mollified) (e.g. nature reserves were set up around the power stations to mollify local conservationists )

177

appease

pacify or placate (someone) by acceding to their demands (e.g. the development ceased to appease the residents) OR assuage or satisfy (a demand or a feeling) (e.g. we give to charity because it appeases our guilt)

178

placate

make (someone) less angry or hostile

179

assuage

make (an unpleasant feeling) less intense (e.g. music acts as a remedy to assuage my depression) OR satisfy (an appetite or desire) (e.g. she is applying for one of the Queensland Academies to assuage her desire to learn)

180

mundane (adj)

lacking interest or excitement (e.g. mundane studying)

181

humdrum

lacking excitement or variety; boringly monotonous (e.g. humdrum and monotonous routine work)

182

monotony

lack of variety and interest; tedious repetition and routine (e.g. monotony song) (e.g. monotony streets)

183

forlorn

pitifully sad and abandoned or lonely (e.g. forlorn figures at bus stops) OR (of an aim or endeavour) unlikely to succeed or be fulfilled (e.g. forlorn attempt to escape)

184

savoury (adj)

(of food) belonging to the category which is salty or spicy rather than sweet (e.g. fresh pineapple is useful in savoury as well as in sweet dishes)

185

wholesome

conducive to or suggestive of good health and physical well-being (e.g. wholesome cereal) OR conducive to or characterized by moral well-being (e.g. wholesome fun)

186

cliche

a phrase or opinion that is overused and betrays a lack of original thought OR a very predictable or unoriginal thing or person (e.g. every house in the entire town is monotonous and cliches, since they were all designed by the same architect)

187

irrevocable

not able to be changed, reversed, or recovered; final (e.g. I have taken an irrevocable step, there is no way to retreat)

188

lavish

sumptuously rich, elaborate, or luxurious (e.g. a lavish banquet) OR (of a person) very generous or extravagant (e.g. a lavish CEO) OR spent or given in profusion (e.g. he deserved the lavish acclamation)

189

sumptuous

splendid and expensive-looking (e.g. a sumptuous and splendid dish)

190

profusion

an abundance or large quantity of something (e.g. a profusion of houses lacking vigour, and all monotonous)

191

banquet

an elaborate and formal evening meal for many people (e.g. a state banquet)

192

languish (verb)

(of a person, animal, or plant) lose or lack vitality; grow weak (e.g. the plants languished as Winter emerged) OR be forced to remain in an unpleasant place or situation (e.g. he has been languishing in the jail for 30 years now)

193

mutable

liable to change (e.g. the mutable nature of teenagers' mind)

194

irreconcilable

(of ideas or statements) so different from each other that they cannot be made compatible (e.g. the remarks were irreconcilable and mixed)

195

docile

ready to accept control or instruction; submissive (e.g. a docile pet)

196

disposition

a person's inherent qualities of mind and character (e.g. he has a disposition of Superman) OR the way in which something/someone is placed or arranged, especially in relation to other things (e.g. the room's disposition is messy) (e.g. the disposition of the army) OR an inclination or tendency (e.g. the Prime Minister has shown a disposition to alter policies)

197

inherent

existing in something as a permanent, essential, or characteristic attribute (e.g. despite the emergence of new technologies, space travelling is still entailed with inherent dangers)

198

cryptic

having a meaning that is mysterious or obscure (e.g. I find this passage uninterpretable and cryptic)

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vernacular

(usu. the vernacular) the language or dialect spoken by the ordinary people of a country or region (e.g. the book was fully translated into the vernacular of the region) OR architecture concerned with domestic and functional rather than public or monumental buildings (e.g. farmhouse vernacular)

200

engender

cause or give rise to (a feeling, situation, or condition) (e.g. the issue will engender public protests)

201

munificence

the quality or action of being extremely generous (e.g. this video is a tribute to those who have shown munificence through donation)

202

doleful

expressing sorrow; mournful OR causing grief or misfortune (e.g. a doleful occurrence)

203

undermine

lessen the effectiveness, power, or ability of, especially gradually or insidiously (e.g. the new proposal is undermining the billions of dollars already committed to it)

204

bane (noun)

a cause of great distress or annoyance (e.g. the telephone was the bane of my life with all these anonymous calls)

205

instigate

bring about or initiate (an action or event) (e.g. they instigated a prevalently supported protest and a reign of terror emerged)

206

allegiance

loyalty or commitment to a superior or to a group or cause (e.g. you must show allegiance to the country)

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insidious

proceeding in a gradual, subtle way, but with very harmful effects (e.g. the child was cyber-bullied insidiously)

208

reign

hold royal office; rule as monarch (e.g. the Queen reigned over UK) OR (of a quality or condition) be the dominant feature of a situation or place (e.g. confusion reigned) (noun: the period of rule of a monarch (e.g. the reign of Queen Elizabeth) (e.g. a reign of terror was instigated) OR the period during which someone or something is predominant or pre-eminent (e.g. I wish for a long reign as the champion in swimming)

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incite

encourage or stir up (violent or unlawful behaviour) (e.g. their protest incited riots) OR urge or persuade (someone) to act in a violent or unlawful way (e.g. incited teenagers to vandalism)

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conspire

make secret plans jointly to commit an unlawful or harmful act (e.g. they conspired against the government)

211

garish

obtrusively bright and showy; lurid (e.g. garish shirts)

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lurid

unpleasantly bright in colour, especially so as to create a harsh or unnatural effect (e.g. lurid food colourings)

213

rudiment

(the rudiments of) the first principles of (a subject) (e.g. the rudiments of English) OR an elementary or primitive form of (something) (e.g. the rudiment of an operating system is the kernel)

214

debut (noun)

a person's first appearance or performance in a particular capacity or role (e.g. the iMac made its debut in 1999)

215

debut (verb)

(person/product/anything) present in public for the first time (e.g. the product is set to debut in 2015 at a ludicrous price of $20,000)

216

recruit

enlist (someone) in… (e.g. we are recruiting new learners)

217

scrutiny

critical observation or examination (e.g. the town was planned under scrutiny)

218

marvel (verb)

be filled with wonder or astonishment (e.g. she was marvelled at the splendid sights in front of her)

219

transcend

be or go beyond the range or limits of (a field of activity or conceptual sphere) (e.g. he will never transcend the quality of Shakespeare's splendid literatures)

220

imprint

impress or stamp (a mark or outline) on a surface (e.g. tyre marks were imprinted in the snow)

221

dispel

make (a doubt, feeling, or belief) disappear (e.g. his eloquent speech had dispelled her doubts)

222

negligible

so small or unimportant as to be not worth considering; insignificant (e.g. despite the treacherous risks entailed with the trip, they are merely negligible)

223

frantic

distraught with fear, anxiety, or other emotion (e.g. she was frantic with anxiety)

224

distraught (adj)

very worried and upset (e.g. a sobbing and distraught woman was shouting at the ocean to relieve her stress)

225

hypnotise

produce a state of hypnosis in (someone) (e.g. her memories were revived after being hypnotised)

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hypnosis

the induction of a state of consciousness in which a person apparently loses the power of voluntary action and is highly responsive to suggestion or direction. Its use in therapy, typically to recover suppressed memories or to allow modification of behaviour, has been revived but is still controversial

227

retrospective

looking back on or dealing with past events or situations (e.g. from a retrospective view, Apple was the true innovator.) (e.g. a retrospective view of computer technology, how far have we came?)

228

incarcerate

imprison or confine (e.g. he was incarcerated for a defraud)

229

caricature

a picture, description, or imitation of a person in which certain striking characteristics are exaggerated in order to create a comic or grotesque effect

230

imitation

the action of using someone or something as a model (e.g. a child learns to speak by imitation)

231

atrocious

horrifyingly wicked OR of a very poor quality; extremely bad or unpleasant (e.g. atrocious weather) (e.g. atrocious work)

232

electrocution

injure or kill (someone) by electric shock

233

busk

play music in the street or other public place for voluntary donations (e.g. the band made its inception from busking on the streets of Philadelphia)

234

refinery

an industrial installation where a substance is refined (e.g. an oil refinery)

235

refine

remove impurities or unwanted elements from (a substance), typically as part of an industrial process OR make minor changes to improve or clarify (a theory or method) (e.g. the law of conservation of mass cannot be further refined)

236

initiative

the ability to assess and initiate things independently (e.g. you must be astute and have initiative to handle this job) OR the power or opportunity to act or take charge before others do (e.g. anti-hunting groups have seized the initiative in the dispute) OR an act or strategy intended to resolve a difficulty or improve a situation; a fresh approach to something (e.g. Find my iPhone in iOS 7 is a new initiative to prevent iPhone robberies)

237

avail

(avail [oneself] of) use or take advantage of (an opportunity or available resource) (e.g. the CEO availed all the strategies he could to earn more money)

238

pillar

a tall vertical structure of stone, wood, or metal, used as a support for a building, or as an ornament or monument OR a person or thing regarded as reliably providing essential support for something (e.g. the pillar of the family)

239

sober

serious, sensible, and solemn (e.g. serious, sensible, and solemn OR verb: make or become sober) (e.g. the school is sober about plagiarism)

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mane

a growth of long hair on the neck of a horse, lion, or other mammal

241

nostril

either of two external openings of the nasal cavity in vertebrates that admit air to the lungs and smells to the olfactory nerves

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divergent

tending to be different or develop in different directions (e.g. divergent interpretation)

243

defunct

no longer existing or functioning (e.g. the defunct tram tracks on Old Cleveland Road)

244

attrition

the process of reducing something's strength or effectiveness through sustained attack or pressure (e.g. the government is putting attrition on enterprises by increasing tax) OR the gradual reduction of a workforce by employees leaving and not being replaced rather than by redundancy (e.g. attrition rate of QASMT)

245

void

not valid or legally binding (e.g. the contract was void) OR (of speech or action) ineffectual; useless OR completely empty (e.g. void space) OR (void of) free from; lacking (e.g. the product is void of toxics) (noun: a completely empty space (e.g. blank voids) OR a feeling of emptiness (e.g. the loss of soldiers left voids in the country)

246

ameliorate

make (something bad or unsatisfactory) (e.g. he ameliorate the situation) (e.g. many consider new developments are ameliorating the living standard)

247

convalesce

recover one's health and strength over a period of time after an illness or medical treatment (e.g. he spent 1 month convalescing his injury)

248

meliorate

ameliorate

249

recuperate

recover from illness or exertion OR recover or regain (something lost or taken) (e.g. they are trying to recuperate the fuselage of the lost aircraft)

250

polish(2)

improve on (e.g. the plan will be polished)

251

embody

be an expression of or give a tangible or visible form to (an idea, quality, or feeling) (e.g. the community embodies spirits that every other communities should mimic) OR include or contain (something) as a constituent part (e.g. the PSDs embodied in the package)

252

constituent

being a part of a whole (e.g. a constituent part of the agreement) OR noun: a component part of something (e.g. the constituents of human body)

253

crude

in a natural or raw state; not yet processed or refined (e.g. crude oil)

254

envisage

contemplate or conceive of as a possibility or a desirable future event (e.g. human envisaged the possibility to fly in the sky and had successfully assuaged the desire through new aircraft) OR form a mental picture of (something not yet existing or known) (e.g. It’s impossible to envisage the situation)

255

scope

the extent of the area or subject matter that something deals with or to which it is relevant (also possibility)

256

stagnant

(of a body of water or the atmosphere of a confined space) having no current or flow and often having an unpleasant smell as a consequence (e.g. I feel very confined in this stagnant room) OR showing no activity; dull and sluggish (e.g. a stagnant property market)

257

scavenge

search for and collect (anything usable) from discarded waste

258

mutinous

wilful or disobedient (e.g. mutinous workforce occupied the radio station)

259

wilful

(of a bad or harmful act) intentional; deliberate OR having or showing a stubborn and determined intention to do as one wants, regardless of the consequences (e.g. being wilful is not always a good thing)

260

lug

carry or drag (a heavy or bulky object) with great effort (e.g. I tried to haul and lug the large baggage across the road)

261

cumber

hamper or hinder (e.g. the scene was cumbered by houses in the way) OR obstruct a path or space (e.g. the road was cumbered by a large truck)

262

ballot

a system of voting secretly and in writing on a particular issue OR the piece of paper used to record a person's vote (e.g. he ripped the ballot apart) (verb: (of an organization) ask (members) to vote secretly on an issue (e.g. the organisation is balloting its members on the new president)

263

encumber

restrict or impede (someone or something) in such a way that free action or movement is difficult (e.g. North Koreans are strictly encumbered by the government)

264

prowess

skill or expertise in a particular activity or field (e.g. his prowess in fishing had won him many awards)

265

captivate (verb)

attract and hold the interest and attention of; charm (e.g. he was captivated by the beauty of the lavish jewellery)

266

heredity

the passing on of physical or mental characteristics genetically from one generation to another OR a person's ancestry (e.g. a treasure that embodies his heredity)

267

intercept

obstruct (someone or something) so as to prevent them from continuing to a destination (e.g. you must overcome interceptions to be successful)

268

inception

the establishment or starting point of an institution or activity (e.g. Miss Hawke is a paragon of all Mathematics teachers despite having only marked her inception at BSHS in 2013)

269

imminent (adj)

about to happen (e.g. it is believed that Earth is in imminent dangers)

270

congregation

a group of people assembled for religious worship (e.g. the Pope preached to the congregation) OR a gathering or collection of people, animals, or things (e.g. the large congregation of birds)

271

preach

deliver a sermon or religious address to an assembled group of people, typically in church (e.g. large numbers of people would come to hear his preaching) OR earnestly advocate (a belief or course of action) (e.g. my parents have always been preaching toleration) OR give moral advice to someone in a pompously self-righteous way (e.g. the film preaches audiences)

272

self-righteous

having or characterized by a certainty, especially an unfounded one, that one is totally correct or morally superior (e.g. self-righteous indignation and complacency)

273

sermon

a talk on a religious or moral subject, especially one given during a church service and based on a passage from the Bible (e.g. he preached the sermon to the congregation)

274

reminiscent

tending to remind one of something (the sight was reminiscent of my time aboard in Sydney) OR suggesting something by resemblance (e.g. the bell tower is vaguely reminiscent of the Big Ben)

275

wistful

having or showing a feeling of vague or regretful longing (e.g. a wistful grin)

276

longing

a yearning desire (e.g. he has been yearning for her)

277

yearning (noun)

a feeling of intense longing for something (adj: involving or expressing yearning (e.g. a yearning hope)

278

neglected (adj)

suffering a lack of proper care (e.g. neglected children were sent to child care centres) OR not receiving proper attention; disregarded (e.g. the Brisbane inner city subway had been a neglected project and is now removed)

279

euthanise

put (an animal) to death humanely (e.g. he suffered in devastation knowing that his dog had been euthanised

280

humane (adj)

having or showing compassion or benevolence (e.g. humane treatment of animals) OR (of a branch of learning) intended to have a civilizing effect on people (e.g. humane numeracy education)

281

benevolent

well meaning and kindly (e.g. a benevolent smile)

282

essence

the intrinsic nature or indispensable quality of something, especially something abstract, which determines its character OR an extract or concentrate obtained from a plant or other matter and used for flavouring or scent (e.g. vanilla essence)

283

intrinsic

belonging naturally; essential (e.g. education is intrinsic to civilised and high-quality life)

284

dispensable

able to be replaced or done without; superfluous (e.g. the transparency in iOS 7 is deemed a dispensable feature by many users)

285

slew

turn or slide violently or uncontrollably (e.g. Conan's skateboard went on a rampage and slewed from side to side) OR a violent or uncontrollable sliding movement (e.g. someone was injured from the slew of the vehicle)

286

appetite (noun)

a natural desire to satisfy a bodily need, especially for food: (e.g. he has a healthy appetite) OR a strong desire or liking for something (e.g. she has an appetite for studying)

287

affix

stick, attach, or fasten (something) to something else (e.g. the panels were affixed to the wall)

288

savour

taste (good food or drink) and enjoy it to the full (e.g. he savoured the dish to the fullest) OR enjoy or appreciate (something pleasant) to the full, especially by lingering over it (e.g. he savoured every moment of the trip) (noun: a characteristic taste, flavour, or smell, especially a pleasant one (e.g. the savour of my mum's dishes)

289

appetising

stimulating one's appetite (e.g. the appetising odours of sizzling steak)

290

queasy

nauseous; feeling sick (e.g. he was queasy in the morning)