Basic Group 12 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Basic Group 12 Deck (331):
1

bride

a woman on her wedding day or just before and after the event (e.g. the bride and groom left early last night)

2

groom

brush and clean the coat of (a horse, dog, or other animal) OR (of an animal) clean the fur or skin of (itself or another animal) (e.g. the dog licked and groomed its furs) OR give a neat and tidy appearance to (someone) (e.g. a well groomed man) OR prepare or train (someone) for a particular purpose or activity (e.g. star pupils who are groomed for higher things)

3

sulk

be silent, morose, and bad-tempered out of annoyance or disappointment (e.g. he was sulking over the dispute)

4

novice

a person new to and inexperienced in a job or situation (e.g. a complete novice in love)

5

probation

the release of an offender from detention, subject to a period of good behaviour under supervision OR a process of testing or observing the character or abilities of a person who is new to a role or job (e.g. during the probation, you will be closely monitored)

6

persevere

continue in a course of action even in the face of difficulty or with little or no indication of success (e.g. despite conducive to failure, the family persevered with the treatment)

7

laud

praise (a person or their achievements) highly (e.g. Miss Hawke was lauded)

8

mediocre

of only average quality; not very good (e.g. despite his enthusiasm, he is merely a mediocre artist)

9

invigilate (verb)

supervise candidates during an examination (e.g. all candidates will be invigilated strictly)

10

dab

press against (something) lightly several times with a piece of absorbent material in order to clean or dry it or to apply a substance (e.g. he dabbed his mouth softly) OR a small amount of something (e.g. a dab of chocolate)

11

prodigious

remarkably or impressively great in extent, size, or degree (e.g. he consumed a prodigious amount of alcohol)

12

granulate

form (something) into grains or particles (e.g. granulated sugar)

13

affirm

state emphatically or publicly (e.g. the prime minister affirmed the country's commitment to peace and deprecation to violence) OR declare one's support for; uphold; defend (e.g. the referendum affirmed the republic's right to secede)

14

affirmative

agreeing with or consenting to a statement or request (e.g. affirmative response)

15

secede

withdraw formally from membership of a federal union, an alliance, or a political or religious organisation (e.g. Britain seceded from the allies)

16

stark

severe or bare in appearance or outline (e.g. stark silhouette) OR complete, sheer (e.g. stark terror) OR unpleasantly or sharply clear (e.g. North Korea's difference to South Korea is a stark contrast)

17

modest

unassuming in the estimation of one's abilities or achievements (e.g. a humble and modest man) OR (of an amount, rate, or level) relatively moderate, limited, or small (e.g. some selective schools' result is only a modest improvement above the others) OR (of a woman) dressing or behaving so as to avoid impropriety or indecency, especially to avoid attracting sexual attention

18

unassuming

not pretentious or arrogant; modest

19

subset

a part of a larger group of related things (e.g. only a small subset of consumers were affected by the issue)

20

puncture

a small hole in a tyre resulting in an escape of air (e.g. her car had a puncture) OR a small hole in something such as the skin, caused by a sharp object (e.g. a puncture wound) OR make a puncture in (something) (e.g. punctured lung) OR cause a sudden collapse of (mood or feeling) (e.g. the earlier mood of optimism has punctured)

21

galore

in abundance (e.g. food and drink galore)

22

converse

engage in conversation (e.g. she could hardly converse with anyone being preoccupied)

23

thatch

a roof covering of straw, reeds, palm leaves, or a similar material (e.g. he was sulking over the noise made by rain drumming on the thatch)

24

hovel

a small squalid or simply constructed dwelling (e.g. unhygienic and dismal hovel)

25

squalid (adj)

(of a place) extremely dirty and unpleasant, especially as a result of poverty or neglect (e.g. squalid hovels) OR showing or involving a contemptible lack of moral standards (e.g. Chinese behaviours are notorious for being squalid)

26

cleaver

a tool with a heavy, broad blade, used by butchers for chopping meat

27

rudimentary

involving or limited to basic principles (e.g. rudimentary education) OR relating to an immature, undeveloped, or basic form (e.g. rudimentary minds)

28

incantation

a series of words said as a magic spell or charm (e.g. the witch murmured the incantation)

29

sinister (adj)

giving the impression that something harmful or evil is happening or will happen (e.g. there was something sinister about that witch's murmur) (e.g. sinister and wicked behaviours)

30

astray

away from the correct path or direction (e.g. I instinctively went astray into the side street but the man pursued me) OR into error or morally questionable behaviour (e.g. he was led astray by an inexplicable incentive)

31

expend

spend or use up (a resource such as money or energy) (e.g. large amount of energy are expended in sports)

32

gratitude

the quality of being thankful; readiness to show appreciation for and to return kindness (e.g. Miss Hawke shows great courtesy and gratitude at all time)

33

transfuse (medical)

transfer (blood or its components) from one person or animal to another OR cause (something or someone) to be permeated or infused by something (e.g. we were transfused with joy)

34

permeate

spread throughout (something); pervade (e.g. the appetising aromas of sizzling steak permeates through the room and activated a sense of joy)

35

craving (noun)

a powerful desire for something (e.g. a craving for chocolate)

36

remittance

a sum of money sent in payment or as a gift (e.g. remittance may be paid with credit card)

37

escort

a person, vehicle, or group accompanying another for protection or as a mark of rank (e.g. they're my highly trained escort) OR accompany (someone or something) somewhere as an escort (e.g. the husband escorted his wife back home)

38

despise

feel contempt or a deep repugnance for (e.g. he was despised for being a self centred despot)

39

redundant

not or no longer needed or useful; superfluous (e.g. an isolated and redundant island)

40

suffice (verb)

be enough or adequate (e.g. a quick look should suffice) (e.g. two examples should suffice to prove the contention)

41

contention

heated disagreement (e.g. the government's incompetence has engendered contention) OR an assertion, especially one maintained in argument (e.g. the fanboys' contention that Apple is the true innovator)

42

exponential (adj)

(of an increase) becoming more and more rapid (e.g. exponential increase in property prices)

43

impersonate

pretend to be (another person) for entertainment or fraud (e.g. any attempt to impersonate a police officer will be considered a crime)

44

interstellar

occurring or situated between stars (e.g. interstellar travel) (e.g. interstellar soccer competition)

45

tranquility

the quality or state of being tranquil; calm (e.g. the tranquility of the country is something that urban residents can only dream of)

46

tranquil

free from disturbance; calm (e.g. the ocean was tranquil despite the earthquake)

47

gaze

look steadily and intently, especially in admiration, surprise, or thought (e.g. he gazed at the screen in astonishment)

48

molest

assault or abuse (a person, especially a woman or child) sexually (e.g. he was charged with molesting and taking obscene photographs) (noun: molester)

49

suave

(especially of a man) charming, confident, and elegant (e.g. a suave and mature gentleman)

50

deferential

showing deference; respectful (e.g. we should be deferential to the ANZAC soldiers)

51

deference

polite submission and respect
(e.g. the film is a tribute to show our deference to the ANZAC soldiers)

52

snatch

quickly seize (something) in a rude or eager way

53

cling

hold on tightly to (e.g. she clung to the handrails) OR adhere or stick firmly or closely to; be hard to part or remove from (e.g. the fabric was clung to her delicate skin with glue) OR remain persistently or stubbornly faithful to (e.g. she chooses to cling on her belief)

54

revelation

a surprising and previously unknown fact that has been disclosed to others (e.g. Apple revealed its revelations of the long journey in developing Swift) OR the making known of something that was previously secret or unknown (e.g. the revelation of Doraemon being brought to the US)

55

divine

of or like God or a god

56

antidote

a medicine taken or given to counteract a particular poison OR something that counteracts an unpleasant feeling or situation (e.g. music is a good antidote to stress)

57

alias (noun)

a false or assumed identity (e.g. a CIA spy working under the alias of Batman)

58

appellation

a name or title (e.g. the city's appellation of "Pearl of the Orient) is well justified)

59

abductor

a person who abducts another person (e.g. after the revelation of the crime, the abductor was condemned for his sins)

60

abduct

take (someone) away illegally by force or deception; kidnap

61

surreal

having the qualities of surrealism; bizarre (e.g. a surreal plot of fact and fantasy)

62

elusive

difficult to find, catch, or achieve (e.g. success will become even more elusive)

63

chant

a repeated rhythmic phrase, typically one shouted or sung in unison by a crowd (e.g. the chants shouted in protest) (verb: say or shout repeatedly in a sing-song tone)

64

unison

simultaneous performance or utterance of action or speech (e.g. the congregation chanted out the slogans in unison)

65

vent

an opening that allows air, gas, or liquid to pass out of or into a confined space

66

hype *informal*

extravagant or intensive publicity or promotion (e.g. his first album hit the stores amid a storm of hype) (verb: promote or publicize (a product or idea) intensively, often exaggerating its benefits (e.g. they were hyping up the ideas that...)

67

triumph

a great victory or achievement (verb: achieve a victory; be successful (e.g. he triumphed over the past champions)

68

stead

the place or role that someone or something should have or fill (e.g. you wish to have him superseded and to be appointed in his stead)

69

cunning

having or showing skill in achieving one's ends by deceit or evasion

70

evade

escape or avoid (someone or something), especially by guile or trickery
guile-sly or cunning intelligence (e.g. friends helped him to evade capture for a time)

71

sly (adj)

having or showing a cunning and deceitful nature (e.g. a sly and manipulative woman) OR showing in an insinuating way that one has some secret knowledge that may be harmful or embarrassing (e.g. a sly grin)

72

insinuating

suggest or hint (something bad) in an indirect and unpleasant way (e.g. dirty, insinuating laughter) OR manoeuvre oneself into (a favourable position) by subtle manipulation

73

discard

get rid of (someone or something) as no longer useful or desirable (e.g. she found her clothes that she discarded on the streets)

74

dysfunctional

not operating normally or properly (e.g. dysfunctional telephones) OR unable to deal adequately with normal social relations (e.g. dysfunctional families)

75

discreet

careful and prudent in one's speech or actions, especially in order to keep something confidential or to avoid embarrassment (e.g. he is very discreet with his words during his presentation) (e.g. he made a discreet inquiry to keep the plan underhand)

76

thrill

a sudden feeling of excitement and pleasure (e.g. the thrill of the aircraft departing) (can be verb) OR an experience that produces a sudden feeling of excitement and pleasure (e.g. to ride a winner is always a thrill)

77

linger

stay in a place longer than necessary because of a reluctance to leave (e.g. she lingered in the yard, enjoying the warm sunshine) OR (linger over) spend a long time over (something) (e.g. she lingered over her meal)

78

smuggle

move (goods) illegally into or out of a country (e.g. he's been smuggling cigarettes from Gibraltar into Spain)

79

counterfeit (adj)

made in exact imitation of something valuable with the intention to deceive or defraud (e.g. counterfeit bills are common in China)

80

apprehend

arrest (someone) for a crime OR understand or perceive (e.g. four dimension world is something we cannot apprehend)

81

ransom

a sum of money demanded or paid for the release of a captive (e.g. the kidnappers demanded a ransom of 1 billion dollars) (verb: obtain the release of (a captive) by paying a ransom (e.g. the king was abducted and had to be ransomed)

82

captive

a person who has been taken prisoner or an animal that has been confined

83

regime

a government, especially an authoritarian one (e.g. North Koreans are very confined in terms of freedom due to their regime) OR a system or ordered way of doing things

84

fruition

the realisation or fulfilment of a plan or project (e.g. the plans have come to fruition rather sooner than expected)

85

fervent

having or displaying a passionate intensity (e.g. committed fervent protesters)

86

veto

veto-a constitutional right to reject a decision or proposal made by a lawmaking body (verb: exercise a veto against (a decision or proposal) OR refuse to accept or allow (e.g. I veto the idea of going on holiday)

87

lacerate

tear or deeply cut (something, especially flesh or skin) (e.g. a badly lacerated wound)

88

entice

attract or tempt by offering pleasure or advantage (e.g. the new features of iOS should be able to entice some Android users to jump over)

89

tempt

entice or try to entice (someone) to do something that they find attractive but know to be wrong or unwise (e.g. some people were tempted to switch platform due to the Android vs iOS dispute) (e.g. jobs which involve entertaining may tempt you to drink more than you intend) OR (be tempted to do something) have an urge or inclination to do something (e.g. he is tempted to study hard)

90

orthodox

following or conforming to the traditional or generally accepted rules or beliefs of a religion, philosophy, or practice (e.g. seppuku was orthodox in the old times) OR of the ordinary or usual type; normal (e.g. we avoided orthodox bars in favour of something different)

91

stranded

(of a boat, sailor, or sea creature) left aground on a shore OR left without the means to move from somewhere (e.g. stranded commuters in the quotidian traffic) (e.g. stranded residents with their homes inundated)

92

smear

coat or mark (something) messily or carelessly with a greasy or sticky substance (e.g. his face was smeared with dirt) OR spread (a greasy or sticky substance) over something (e.g. she smeared sunscreens on her delicate skin) OR damage the reputation of (someone) by false accusations; slander

93

slander

the action or crime of making a false spoken statement damaging to a person's reputation (e.g. his attempt to slander her had no effect on her reputation) OR a false and malicious spoken statement (e.g. I am sick of your slanders) (verb: make false and damaging statements about (someone) (e.g. why did you slander her?)

94

prejudice

preconceived opinion that is not based on reason or actual experience (e.g. English racial prejudice against foreigners) OR give rise to prejudice in (someone); make biased (e.g. Samsung's new commercial may prejudice fanboys. )

95

rejoice

feel or show great joy or delight (e.g. we spent the evening rejoicing about our triumph)

96

aggravate

make (a problem, injury, or offence) worse or more serious (e.g. military actions will only aggravate the protest and ultimately causes the regime to collapse)

97

dilute

make (something e.g. liquid) weaker in force, content, or value by modification or the addition of other elements (e.g. diluted fruit juice)

98

culmination

the highest or climactic point of something, especially as attained after a long time (e.g. the culmination of communication technology, technology is now at its most sophisticated form)

99

didactic (adj)

intended to teach, particularly in having moral instruction as an ulterior motive (e.g. didactic novel) OR in the manner of a teacher, particularly so as to appear patronising (e.g. he tried to sound didactic)

100

ulterior

existing beyond what is obvious or admitted; intentionally hidden (e.g. could there be an ulterior truth to this?)

101

pitfall

a hidden or unsuspected danger or difficulty (e.g. pitfalls that may be entailed with the trip) OR a covered pit used as a trap (e.g. he fell in a pitfall)

102

solace

comfort or consolation in a time of great distress or sadness (e.g. he showed gratitude to the staff who solaced her) OR give solace to (e.g. soft music solaced her anxiety)

103

console

comfort (someone) at a time of grief or disappointment (e.g. Miss Hawke is a kind hearted teacher and often console stressing students)

104

dispossess

deprive (someone) of land, property, or other possessions (e.g. the communist government ordered that he would be dispossessed of the land)

105

deprive

prevent (a person or place) from having or using something (e.g. the city was deprived of its water supplies.)

106

endeavour

try hard to do or achieve something (noun: an attempt to achieve a goal (e.g. an endeavour to get it working) OR earnest, prolonged, and industrious effort (e.g. the splendid endeavour of the workers) OR an enterprise or undertaking (e.g. portfolio of business endeavours)

107

adept (adj)

very skilled or proficient at something (e.g. an adept negotiator

108

diplomat

an official representing a country abroad (e.g. the diplomat of the People's Republic of China) OR a person who can deal with others in a sensitive and tactful way

109

refectory

a room used for communal meals in an educational or religious institution (e.g. the students just had lunch in the refectory

110

communal

shared by all members of a community; for common use (e.g. a communal bathroom and kitchen) OR relating to or done by a community (e.g. communal pride) OR (of conflict) between different communities (e.g. communal riots/disputes)

111

decrepit

worn out or ruined because of age or neglect OR (of a person) elderly and infirm

112

infirm

not physically or mentally strong, especially through age or illness (e.g. infirm elderly)

113

liaise

cooperate on a matter of mutual concern (e.g. the school liaised with other schools around the state)

114

grounding

basic training or instruction in a subject (e.g. every child needs a good grounding in science, mathematics and technology)

115

pedagogic

relating to teaching (e.g. Miss Hawke has great pedagogic skills)

116

tender

showing gentleness, kindness, and affection OR young, inexperienced, or vulnerable (e.g. he started sailing at the tender age of 10) OR (of a part of the body) sensitive to pain (e.g. the tender skin of his forearms) OR requiring tact or careful handling (e.g. the tender issue of conscription)

117

tact

skill and sensitivity in dealing with others or with difficult issues (e.g. all news reporters must be astute and have tact)

118

affection

a gentle feeling of fondness or liking (e.g. he felt affection for the generous gentleman) (e.g. he felt affection for this new house)

119

advocate

(can be verb)

120

accustomed (adj)

customary; usual (e.g. accustomed route)

121

embroider

decorate (cloth) by sewing patterns on it with thread (e.g. an embroidered handkerchief) OR add fictitious or exaggerated details to (an account) to make it more interesting (e.g. he embroidered his stories with colourful details)

122

blouse

a woman's upper garment resembling a shirt, typically with a collar, buttons, and sleeves

123

loathe

feel intense dislike or disgust for (e.g. she loathed him on sight)

124

aseptic

free from contamination caused by harmful bacteria, viruses, or other microorganisms; surgically sterile or sterilised

125

fluctuate

rise and fall irregularly in number or amount (e.g. the fluctuating prices of properties)

126

stealth

cautious and surreptitious action or movement (e.g. stealth hungry feral cat)

127

surreptitious

kept secret, especially because it would not be approved of (e.g. surreptitious underhand drug deals)

128

deficiency

a lack or shortage (e.g. there was never a deficiency of crops in India during the initial period of the famines)

129

tuition

teaching or instruction, especially of individual pupils or small groups (e.g. the fees of school tuition was too high for them)

130

nebulous (adj)

in the form of a cloud or haze; hazy (e.g. diaphanous, nebulous fogs) OR (of a concept) vague or ill-defined (e.g. the quality of a thing is subjective and is a nebulous concept.)

131

conundrum

a confusing and difficult problem or question (e.g. it's a conundrum, even for the experts)

132

impenetrable

impossible to pass through or enter (e.g. impenetrable maze) OR impossible to understand (e.g. impenetrable feelings)

133

colleague

a person with whom one works in a profession or business (e.g. he constantly outperforms his colleagues)

134

digress

leave the main subject temporarily in speech or writing (e.g. I have digressed a little from my original plan in my story, but it's a fun thing worth mentioning about)

135

bigoted

having or revealing an obstinate belief in the superiority of one's own opinions and a prejudiced intolerance of the opinions of others (e.g. he is a solipsistic and bigoted and culpable person)

136

obstinate

stubbornly refusing to change one's opinion or chosen course of action, despite attempts to persuade one to do so (e.g. er obstinate determination to pursue a career in radio)

137

expedient

(of an action) convenient and practical although possibly improper or immoral (e.g. you may turn on your mobile phones if it is expediently in reach)

138

iterate

perform or utter repeatedly (e.g. the bird's call is a monotonously iterated single note) (e.g. I'm tired of the iteration of the birds' singing)

139

stale

(of ANYTHING, e.g. food) no longer new or interesting or exciting or fresh (e.g. their marriage had gone stale.) (e.g. the bread had gone stale) OR verb: make or become stale (e.g. the bread is staling now)

140

disingenuous

not candid or sincere, typically by pretending that one knows less about something than one really does (e.g. this journalist was being somewhat disingenuous)

141

candid

truthful and straightforward; frank (e.g. his responses were obviously not candid)

142

cynical

believing that people are motivated purely by self-interest; distrustful of human sincerity or integrity OR doubtful as to whether something will happen or whether it is worthwhile (e.g. most residents are cynical about efforts to clean the graffitis)

143

dint

a dent or hollow in a surface (e.g. I won't accept even something as subtle as a slight dint on a coconut)

144

dent

a slight hollow in a hard even surface made by a blow or pressure OR a reduction in amount or size (verb: have an adverse effect on; diminish (e.g. the government's promotion of welfare had an effect on denting on the growth of poverty) OR mark with a dent (e.g. he hit the wall and made a slight dent)

145

consensus

a general agreement (e.g. here is a growing consensus that the current regime has failed)

146

perpetuate

make (something) continue indefinitely OR make (something) continue indefinitely (e.g. his confusion was perpetuated due to the lack of action)

147

nuance

a subtle difference in or shade of meaning, expression, or sound OR (e.g. he was familiar with the nuances of the local dialect) (verb: give nuance to (e.g. the effect of the music is nuanced by the social situation of listeners)

148

tribunal

a court of justice

149

complacent

showing smug or uncritical satisfaction with oneself or one's achievements (e.g. there is always space to improve, no one should be complacent here)

150

smug

having or showing an excessive pride in oneself or one's achievements (e.g. he was feeling smug after his win)

151

correlation

a mutual relationship or connection between two or more things (a correlation between education and life quality) (e.g. there is certainly a correlation between education and the quality of life)

152

prestige

widespread respect and admiration felt for someone or something on the basis of a perception of their achievements or quality (e.g. the firm has recently gained considerable prestige)

153

reminisce

indulge in enjoyable recollection of past events (e.g. they reminisced about their summers abroad) (e.g. the sight invites me to reminisce of my time abroad in Sydney)

154

recollection

the action or faculty of remembering or recollecting something (e.g. to my recollection, MFT did not exist last year)

155

traction

the action of drawing or pulling something over a surface, especially a road or track (e.g. a primitive vehicle used in animal traction) OR the extent to which an idea, product, etc. gains popularity or acceptance (e.g. the iPhone had gained much traction in the mobile market)

156

concise

giving a lot of information clearly and in a few words; brief but comprehensive (e.g. a concise account of the country's history)

157

nepotism

the practice among those with power or influence of favouring relatives or friends, especially by giving them jobs (e.g. nepotism was a prevalent issue in the industry)

158

calibre

the quality of someone's character or the level of their ability (e.g. the high calibre of selective schools) OR the standard reached by something (e.g. they could not afford to lose a man of his calibre)

159

concur (verb)

be of the same opinion; agree (e.g. I concur) OR happen or occur at the same time; coincide

160

leverage

the exertion of force by means of a lever (e.g. my spade hit something solid that wouldn't respond to leverage) OR the power to influence a person or situation (e.g. the Labor party had lost much of its leverage since it lost to LNP in the election) (verb: use (something) to maximum advantage (e.g. the enterprise should leverage all the resources)

161

exert

apply or bring to bear (a force, influence, or quality) (e.g. how much control can he exert over his own life?) OR (exert oneself) make a physical or mental effort (e.g. he needs to exert himself to find an answer)

162

appeal

make a serious, urgent, or heartfelt request

163

prospective

expected or expecting to be the specified thing in the future (e.g. she showed the prospective buyers around the house) OR likely to happen at a future date (prospective upheaval in population)

164

elation

great happiness and exhilaration (e.g. he shows gratitude to those who helped him overcome the illness and brought him elation)

165

exhilarate

make (someone) feel very happy, animated, or elated

166

bawl

shout or call out noisily and unrestrainedly (e.g. "Move out!", he bawled) (noun: a loud, unrestrained shout (e.g. he was annoyed by the constant bawls from the hawker)

167

dormitory

a large bedroom for a number of people in a school or institution

168

infernal

relating to or characteristic of hell or the underworld (e.g. the infernal regions)

169

vent

an opening that allows air, gas, or liquid to pass out of or into a confined space OR the release or expression of a strong emotion, energy, etc (e.g. children give vent to their anger by bawling)

170

brunch

a late morning meal eaten instead of breakfast and lunch

171

frill

a strip of gathered or pleated material sewn on to a garment or larger piece of material as a decorative edging or ornament

172

pleat

a double or multiple fold in a garment or other item made of cloth, held by stitching the top or side (verb: fold into pleats)

173

ornament

a thing used or serving to make something look more attractive but usually having no practical purpose, especially a small object such as a figurine (e.g. tables covered with ornaments and books) (verb: make (something) look more attractive by adding decorative items (e.g. jewels to ornament your wife)

174

obnoxious

extremely unpleasant (e.g. obnoxious odours)

175

embellish

make (something) more attractive by the addition of decorative details or features OR make (a statement or story) more interesting by adding extra details that are often untrue (e.g. his attempt to embellish his account during the interrogation has gotten him into trouble)

176

stunt

prevent from growing or developing properly (e.g. the lack of funding is stunting the growth of the city)

177

rant

speak or shout at length in an angry, impassioned way (e.g. she was still ranting on showing her indignant about the match)

178

hefty

large and heavy OR done with vigour or force (e.g. a hefty kick)

179

barring

except for; if not for (Barring fully working Dark Mode, DP2 includes virtually all attributes of Yosemite)

180

arbitrary

based on random choice or personal whim, rather than any reason or system (e.g. an arbitrary decision) OR (of power or a ruling body) unrestrained and autocratic in the use of authority (e.g. a corrupted arbitrary government)

181

autocratic

relating to a ruler who has absolute power (e.g. an autocratic government) OR taking no account of other people's wishes or opinions; domineering (e.g. autocratic government)

182

domineer

assert one's will over another in an arrogant way

183

flounder

struggle or stagger clumsily in mud or water (e.g. he was floundering about in the shallow offshore waters) OR struggle mentally; show or feel great confusion (e.g. she was floundered by the question, not knowing what to respond) OR be in serious difficulty (e.g. many enterprises are floundering to survive)

184

commodity

a raw material or primary agricultural product that can be bought and sold, such as copper or coffee

185

fortitude

courage in pain or adversity (e.g. she endured her illness with great fortitude)

186

ethos

the characteristic spirit of a culture, era, or community as manifested in its attitudes and aspirations (e.g. Miss Hawke clearly embodies the ethos of BSHS)

187

manifest

clear or obvious to the eye or mind (e.g. her manifest beauty) (verb: show (a quality or feeling) by one's acts or appearance; demonstrate; prove (e.g. Lizzy manifested signs of excruciating pain by holding her wound. ) (e.g. bad industrial relations are often manifested in strikes) OR (of an ailment) become apparent through the appearance of symptoms (e.g. xxx disorder usually manifests in middle aged man)

188

ailment

an illness, typically a minor one (e.g. middle aged people are prone to an ailment called...)

189

vandalise

deliberately destroy or damage (public or private property) (e.g. stations have been vandalised beyond recognition)

190

audacious

showing a willingness to take surprisingly bold risks (e.g. he audaciously took on the job knowing the treacherous risks entailed with it) OR showing an impudent lack of respect (e.g. he made an audacious remark to the ANZAC soldiers, Australia is ashamed)

191

empower

give (someone) the authority or power to do something (e.g. a good education empowers learners to achieve great things and contribute to the world.)

192

veteran

a person who has had long experience in a particular field (e.g. a veteran in fighting)

193

devoid

entirely lacking or free from (e.g. Lisa kept her voice devoid of emotion.) (e.g. Android's devoid of security is fostering iOS's growth)

194

discrepancy

an illogical or surprising lack of compatibility or similarity between two or more facts (a substantial discrepancy between the two accounts)

195

constellation

a group of stars forming a recognizable pattern that is traditionally named after its apparent form or identified with a mythological figure OR a group of associated or similar people or things (e.g. a constellation of symptoms)

196

abrasive (adj)

(of a substance or material) capable of polishing or cleaning a hard surface by rubbing or grinding (e.g. abrasive kitchen cleaners) OR showing little concern for the feelings of others; harsh (e.g. she is self centred and abrasive)

197

graze

(of cattle, sheep, etc.) eat grass in a field (e.g. the constellation of animals grazed on the farm) OR (of an animal) feed on (grass or grassland) (e.g. the farmlands grazed by sheep) OR put (cattle, sheep, etc.) to feed on grassland (e.g. his duty is to graze the cows on the grassland every morning)

198

grind

reduce (something) to small particles or powder by crushing it; rub or cause to rub together gratingly (e.g. grind some black pepper over the salad) (past participle ground) OR sharpen, smooth, or produce (something) by crushing or by friction OR rub or cause to rub together gratingly (e.g. tectonic plates that inexorably grind against each other) OR press or rub (something) into a surface (e.g. he ground a cigarette onto the ground) OR move noisily and laboriously (e.g. the truck ground up the hills)

199

cutlery

knives, forks, and spoons used for eating or serving food

200

laborious

requiring considerable time and effort (e.g. laborious efforts to haul the thing across the road) (e.g. years of laborious training)

201

grind (noun)

a crushing or grating sound or motion (e.g. the grinds of the bulldozer is a torture for the surrounding residents) OR hard dull work (e.g. relieve from daily grinds)

202

grating

sounding harsh and unpleasant OR irritating (e.g. a grating personality of being too quiet)

203

venerate

regard with great respect; revere (it is venerated that Steve Jobs is a true innovator)

204

contour

an outline representing or bounding the shape or form of something (e.g. Asian immigration has shaped the contour of Australia's multiculturalism) (verb: mould into a specific shape, especially one designed to fit into something else (e.g. the compartment has been contoured with smooth rounded corners)

205

compartment

a separate section or part of a structure or container (e.g. freezer compartment) (e.g. first class compartment of a train) (e.g. religion and politics should be kept in different compartments.)

206

relic

an object surviving from an earlier time, especially one of historical interest (e.g. the mansion is a splendid relic dating back from the Middle Ages) OR a person or thing that has survived from an earlier time but is now outmoded (e.g. Nokias had became embarrassing relics from the introduction of the iPhone)

207

avenue

a way of approaching a problem or making progress towards something (this is the one and only avenue to escape)

208

contemptible

deserving contempt; despicable (e.g. contemptible cowardice)

209

cowardice

lack of bravery

210

despicable

deserving hatred and contempt (e.g. despicable prejudiced remarks)

211

ostensible

stated or appearing to be true, but not necessarily so (Although ostensible, the real fact is, it is not true)

212

subdue

overcome, quieten, or bring under control (a feeling or person) (e.g. music subdued her anger) OR bring (a country or people) under control by force (e.g. the Chinese government had to use military forces to subdue the protesters)

213

vanquish

defeat thoroughly (e.g. Germany vanquished Brazil in the game)

214

paralysis

inability to act or function properly (e.g. the school was under paralysis caused by the inundation)

215

realm

a kingdom (e.g. the strongest realm in the continent)

216

contraceptive

(of a method or device) serving to prevent pregnancy (e.g. contraceptive surgery/drugs)

217

mesmerise

capture the complete attention of (someone); transfix (e.g. the mesmerising story intrigued many readers)

218

transfix

cause (someone) to become motionless with horror, wonder, or astonishment (e.g. he was transfixed by the dismal conditions of the squalid hovels)

219

detain

keep (someone) from proceeding by holding them back or making claims on their attention (e.g. we are trying to detain Min Jae from going to Canada) OR keep (someone) in official custody, typically for questioning about a crime or in a politically sensitive situation (e.g. Hong Kong politicians were detained by China) OR officially seize and hold (goods) (e.g. my goods were detained permanently)

220

corsage

a spray of flowers worn pinned to a woman's clothes

221

pessimism

a tendency to see the worst aspect of things or believe that the worst will happen (e.g. the devoid of universal suffrage in Hong Kong last year had casted deep pessimism in the prospect of future universal suffrage)

222

suffrage

the right to vote in political elections (e.g. women's suffrage was non existent a century ago)

223

torment

severe physical or mental suffering (e.g. the family fell in deep torment as his death was confirmed) (verb: cause to experience severe mental or physical suffering (e.g. jealousy tormented him) OR annoy or provoke in an unkind way (e.g. he was tormented by the grinds of the bulldozer)

224

disciplinary

concerning or enforcing discipline (e.g. a disciplinary policy)

225

discipline

the practice of training people to obey rules or a code of behaviour, using punishment to correct disobedience OR the controlled behaviour resulting from such training (e.g. all high school students should have discipline)

226

discerning

having or showing good judgement (e.g. discerning analysis)

227

ethereal

extremely delicate and light in a way that seems not to be of this world (e.g. her ethereal beauty)

228

expound

present and explain (a theory or idea) in detail (e.g. his presentation did little to expound or clarify his idea)

229

disembark

leave a ship, aircraft, or train

230

allure

the quality of being powerfully and mysteriously attractive or fascinating (e.g. the comprehensive school held no allure compared to the selective school next door)

231

ambience

the character and atmosphere of a place (e.g. the horrifying ambiences in the seemingly perpetuating darkness of the caves)

232

quaint

attractively unusual or old-fashioned (e.g. quaint love story) (e.g. quaint ostentatious cottage)

233

slouch

stand, move, or sit in a lazy, drooping way (e.g. slouching on the beach) (e.g. slouch against the wall) OR a lazy, drooping posture or movement

234

gait

a person's manner of walking (e.g. a peculiar slouching gait) OR the pattern of steps of a horse or dog at a particular speed (e.g. abnormal gait)

235

sentiment

a view or opinion that is held or expressed (e.g. I agree with your sentiments regarding the road bridge.) OR a general feeling or opinion (e.g. the government must control the rampaging racist sentiments) OR a feeling or emotion (e.g. intense sentiment of horror) OR exaggerated and self-indulgent feelings of tenderness, sadness, or nostalgia (e.g. he was unhappy to find himself in sentiment)

236

sentimental

of or prompted by feelings of tenderness, sadness, or nostalgia (e.g. the sentimental attachment to this place)

237

treacly

resembling treacle in consistency, taste, or appearance OR excessively sentimental (e.g. treacly sensations felt in this place)

238

concoction

a mixture of various ingredients or elements (e.g. the facade is a concoction of British and American sensations)

239

retract

draw or be drawn back or back in (e.g. retractable glass domes over the Mall of the World) (e.g. she retracted her hand as if she'd been burnt) OR withdraw (a statement or accusation) as untrue or unjustified (e.g. the authority apologised and retracted the pledge)

240

artifice

clever or cunning devices or expedients, especially as used to trick or deceive others (e.g. Dubai is a city built on artifice)

241

device

(can also be) a plan, method, or trick with a particular aim

242

scrupulous

(of a person or process) diligent, thorough, and extremely attentive to details (e.g. we must not be complacent about security and it must be carried out scrupulously) OR very concerned to avoid doing wrong (e.g. she is very scrupulous to ensure she makes no error on the exam)

243

dupe

deceive; trick (e.g. the newspaper was duped into publishing a false report) (noun: a victim of deception (e.g. the poor dupes being slaved)

244

epitome

(the epitome of) a person or thing that is a perfect example of a particular quality or type (e.g. Miss Hawke is an epitome of all Mathematics teachers)

245

decadence

moral or cultural decline as characterized by excessive indulgence in pleasure or luxury OR luxurious self-indulgence (e.g. Dubai is chiefly ran by affluent and greedy people indulged in decadence with slaves duped to serve them)

246

exorbitant

(of a price or amount charged) unreasonably high (e.g. some people argue that the prices of apple products are exorbitant)

247

exile

the state of being barred from one's native country, typically for political or punitive reasons (verb: expel and bar (someone) from their native country, typically for political or punitive reasons (e.g. instead of being detained, the politician was exiled from the country)

248

strut

a rod or bar forming part of a framework and designed to resist compression (e.g. a supporting strut) OR a stiff, erect, and apparently arrogant or conceited gait (e.g. it's not good to always have strut)

249

conceit

excessive pride in oneself

250

vain

having or showing an excessively high opinion of one's appearance, abilities, or worth (e.g. a vain woman) OR producing no result; useless (e.g. a vain attempt to escape)

251

erect

rigidly upright or straight (e.g. he stood erect) (verb: put together and set upright (a building, wall, or other structure) (e.g. the ostentatious and splendid mansion was erected in the 19th century) OR create or establish (a theory or system) (e.g. the law of conservation of mass was erected by...)

252

handiwork

something that one has made or done (e.g. the Earth is considered by some as the study of God’s handiwork) OR making things by hand, considered as a subject of instruction (e.g. they were taught handiworks in primary school)

253

menace

a person or thing that is likely to cause harm; a threat or danger (e.g. the snakes are a menace to the animals) OR a threatening quality or atmosphere (e.g. a menace ambience)

254

fateful

having far-reaching and often disastrous consequences or implications

255

vengeance

punishment inflicted or retribution exacted for an injury or wrong (e.g. Labor’s loss was a vengeance from the voters)

256

crucify

put (someone) to death by nailing or binding them to a cross, especially as an ancient punishment OR cause anguish to (someone)

257

anguish

severe mental or physical pain or suffering (verb: be extremely distressed about something (e.g. I am anguishing about my decision to apply for QASMT)

258

baffling

impossible to understand; perplexing (e.g. a baffling approach to maintain small screens on iPhones)

259

amputate

cut off (a limb) by surgical operation (e.g. he’d rather have his hand amputated than enduring that excruciating pain)

260

taint

a trace of a bad or undesirable substance or quality (e.g. his action betrayed a taint of impurity and corruption in the government) (verb: contaminate or pollute (something); affect with undesirable quality (e.g. the premier’s decision is tainting the quality of life in Australia)

261

seminar

a conference or other meeting for discussion or training

262

swoop

(especially of a bird) move rapidly downwards through the air (e.g. the eagle swooped down aiming for its preys) OR carry out a sudden attack, especially in order to make a capture or arrest (e.g. the police swooped

263

beige

a pale sandy fawn colour (e.g. beige coloured side)

264

probe

a thorough investigation into a crime or other matter (verb: explore or examine (something), especially with the hands or an instrument OR enquire into someone or something closely (e.g. the police probed cautiously about the incident)

265

blunt

(of a cutting implement) not having a sharp edge or point (e.g. a blunt knife) OR having a flat or rounded end (e.g. a peculiar blunt ended leave) (verb: make or become less sharp (e.g. the blunted knife) OR weaken or reduce the force of (something) (e.g. their determination blunted in no time at all)

266

forthright

(of a person or their manner or speech) direct and outspoken (e.g. forthright slanders)

267

malign

evil in nature or effect (e.g. the malign influence of the pro-Russian separatists fostered fights and disputes)

268

stall

a stand, booth, or compartment for the sale of goods in a market or large covered area (e.g. Fruit stalls in the market) (e.g. Mothers’ Day Stalls) OR an individual compartment for an animal in a stable or cowshed, enclosed on three sides OR an instance of an engine, vehicle, aircraft, or boat stalling (verb: (of a motor vehicle or its engine) stop running, typically because of an overload on the engine (e.g. the car stalled in the middle of the road) OR stop or cause to stop making progress (e.g. the business stalled) OR put or keep (an animal) in a stall, especially in order to fatten it (e.g. the horses were stalled) OR speak or act in a deliberately vague way in order to gain more time to deal with something; prevaricate

269

prevaricate

speak or act in an evasive way

270

evasive

tending to avoid commitment or self-revelation, especially by responding only indirectly; directed towards avoidance or escape (e.g. she was evasive in the conversation trying to avoid answering those questions)

271

anagram

a word, phrase, or name formed by rearranging the letters of another, such as spar, formed from rasp

272

traverse

travel/extend across or through (e.g. a pathway that transverses the soaring and lively jungle) OR consider the whole extent of (a subject) (e.g. explore and traverse the different aspects of the issues in your essay) OR move back and forth or sideways (e.g. a probe traversed along the tunnel) (noun: an act of traversing something (e.g. traverse of the forest entails hidden dangers)

273

perpetrate

carry out or commit (a harmful, illegal, or immoral action) (e.g. a robbery has been perpetrated by the Dark Organisation)

274

condolence

an expression of sympathy, especially on the occasion of the death of a person's relative or close friend (e.g. we offer sincere condolence to those who lost their lives)

275

escalate

increase rapidly (e.g. the cost of health care is escalating) OR make or become more intense or serious (e.g. tension escalated)

276

notion

a conception of or belief about something (e.g. children have different notions about the roles of their parents) OR an impulse or desire, especially one of a whimsical kind (e.g. a sudden escalating notion to study)

277

robust

strong and healthy; vigorous (e.g. robust old man) OR (of a system, organisation, etc.) able to withstand or overcome adverse condition (e.g. a robust economic that has withstood the financial crisis) OR uncompromising and forceful (e.g. a robust decision that all approaching planes must be shot down)

278

deterrent

a thing that discourages or is intended to discourage someone from doing something (e.g. speed cameras are a major deterrent to speeding) (adj: able or intended to deter (e.g. the outcome is deterrent to the already erected theory)

279

deter

discourage (someone) from doing something by instilling doubt or fear of the consequences (e.g. nothing can deter him from surrendering)

280

unequivocal

leaving no doubt; unambiguous (e.g. unequivocal answer)

281

thorny

having many thorns or thorn bushes (e.g. thorny plants) OR causing distress, difficulty, or trouble (e.g. a thorny problem)

282

awe

a feeling of reverential respect mixed with fear or wonder (e.g. they gazed in awe at the small mountain of diamonds) (verb: inspire with awe (e.g. the instructor awe her students)

283

reverential

of the nature of, due to, or characterised by reverence

284

reverence

deep respect for someone or something (e.g. a tribute to show reverence for those who lost their lives) (verb: regard or treat with deep respect (e.g. we reverence those who lost their life)

285

dread

anticipate with great apprehension or fear (noun: great fear or apprehension)

286

aloof

not friendly or forthcoming; cool and distant (e.g. an aloof star) OR conspicuously uninvolved (e.g. she was aloof from the work)sovereign

287

sovereign

a supreme ruler, especially a monarch (adj: possessing supreme or ultimate power (e.g. in modern democracies the people's will is in theory sovereign) OR acting or done independently and without outside interference (e.g. a sovereign and independent country)

288

affectionate

readily feeling or showing fondness or tenderness (e.g. her affectionate nature) OR expressing fondness (e.g. affectionate kiss)

289

unsentimental

not displaying or influenced by sentimental feelings

290

sentimental

of or prompted by feelings of tenderness, sadness, or nostalgia (e.g. she felt a sentimental attachment to the place) OR having or arousing feelings of tenderness, sadness, or nostalgia, typically in an exaggerated and self-indulgent way (e.g. a sentimental prose)

291

comical

amusing, especially in a ludicrous or absurd way (e.g. a series of comical misunderstandings)

292

reckless

heedless of danger or the consequences of one's actions; rash or impetuous

293

heedless

showing a reckless lack of care or attention (e.g. ‘Elaine!’ she shouted, heedless of attracting unwanted attention)

294

impetuous

acting or done quickly and without thought or care (e.g. impetuous decision) OR moving forcefully or rapidly (e.g. an impetuous flow of water)

295

rash

acting or done without careful consideration of the possible consequences; impetuous (e.g. it would be extremely rash to make such an assumption as it may potentially be a slander)

296

quick-witted

showing or characterised by an ability to think or respond quickly and effectively (e.g. a perfect paragon of astute and quick-witted thinking)

297

tread (past trod)

walk in a specified way (e.g. she trod as lightly as she could) OR walk on or along (noun: a person's manner of walking or the sound made as they walk (e.g. his heavy, reckless and inconsiderate tread)

298

pathos

a quality that evokes pity or sadness (e.g. pathos evoked generous people to donate)

299

chariot

a two-wheeled vehicle drawn by horses, used in ancient racing and warfare

300

courtier

a person who attends a royal court as a companion or adviser to the king or queen

301

desolate

(of a place) uninhabited and giving an impression of bleak emptiness (e.g. despite inhabited, the palace certainly wasn't a desolate disappointment) OR feeling or showing great unhappiness or loneliness (e.g. he suddenly felt desolate) (verb: make (a place) appear bleakly empty (e.g. the drought desolated the bustling City) OR make (someone) feel utterly wretched and unhappy (e.g. they were devastated and desolated by the plane crash)

302

wretched

(of a person) in a very unhappy or unfortunate state (e.g. wretched family who suffered from both incidents) OR of poor quality; very bad (e.g. the wretched conditions of the squalid shelters)

303

blemish

a small mark or flaw which spoils the appearance of something (e.g. Fi’s delicate skin was without a blemish) (verb: spoil the appearance or quality of (something) (e.g. the stone slabs were not blemished even with a single speck of dirt)

304

nook

a corner or recess, especially one offering seclusion or security (e.g. students in distress should not hesitate to find a nook for a rest)

305

cranny

a small, narrow space or opening (e.g. I could feel the peculiar, sinister ambience of the cranny)

306

seclude

keep (someone) away from other people (e.g. I found a small, comfortable cranny to seclude myself from the world)

307

sabotage

deliberately destroy, damage, or obstruct (something), especially for political or military advantage (e.g. the fences were sabotaged by the Russian troops) (noun: the action of sabotaging something)

308

scrutinise

examine or inspect closely and thoroughly (e.g. the probe will scrutinise every bit of details in the debris)

309

arsenal

a collection of weapons and military equipment OR an array of resources available for a certain purpose (e.g. an arsenal of high-tech equipments) OR a place where weapons and military equipment are stored or made

310

unremitting

never relaxing or slackening; incessant (e.g. unremitting excruciating pain)

311

ardour

great enthusiasm or passion (e.g. the incident did very little to dampen his ardour)

312

specious

superficially plausible, but actually wrong (e.g. a specious pretence of improvement)

313

glut

an excessively abundant supply of something (e.g. a glut of apartments) (verb: supply or fill to excess (e.g. the highway was glutted with vehicles)

314

synopsis

a brief summary or general survey of something

315

abstain

restrain oneself from doing or enjoying something (e.g. you must abstain from violences) OR refrain from drinking alcohol (e.g. I will always abstain) OR formally decline to vote either for or against a proposal or motion

316

insinuate

suggest or hint (something bad) in an indirect and unpleasant way OR (insinuate oneself into) manoeuvre oneself into (a favourable position) by subtle manipulation OR slide (oneself or a thing) slowly and smoothly into a particular place (e.g. he insinuated his body into the cranny)

317

covenant

an agreement (e.g. no one can impede Killua from complying to the covenant he made to himself) (verb: agree by lease, deed, or other legal contract (e.g. the owner covenanted to be responsible for the damage)

318

levitate

rise or cause to rise and hover in the air, typically by means of supposed magical powers (e.g. he levitated the object into the air)

319

relentless

oppressively constant; incessant; hard or inflexible (e.g. the relentless heat)

320

persecute

subject (someone) to hostility and ill-treatment, especially because of their race or political or religious beliefs (e.g. the politician was detained and persecuted under Chinese dictatorship) OR harass or annoy (someone) persistently (e.g. she was sexually persecuted his all life)

321

plummet

fall or drop straight down at high speed (e.g. the plane plummeted rapidly from 30,000 feet above ground) OR decrease rapidly in value or amount (e.g. unit value plummeted) (noun: a steep and rapid fall or drop)

322

prodigy

a young person with exceptional qualities or abilities (e.g. a competent school with many prodigies) OR an outstanding example of a particular quality (e.g. Miss Hawke is a prodigy of an exceptional Mathematics teacher) OR an amazing or unusual thing, especially one out of the ordinary course of nature (e.g. a prodigy of 3D effect on painting)

323

segregation

the action or state of setting someone or something apart from others (e.g. the segregation of noisy students benefits the majority of the class)

324

perilous

full of danger or risk OR exposed to imminent risk of disaster or ruin (e.g. sickness in perilous state)

325

allude

suggest or call attention to indirectly; hint at (e.g. she alluded and insinuated at the immoral actions)

326

rational

based on or in accordance with reason or logic (e.g. a justified rational response)

327

presumptuous

(of a person or their behaviour) failing to observe the limits of what is permitted or appropriate (e.g. it is presumptuous to believe that breaching the law is no big deal)

328

deploy

bring into effective action (e.g. the new uniform policy will be deployed)

329

char

partially burn so as to blacken the surface (e.g. the debris was charred with the accompanied explosion)

330

tout

attempt to sell (something), typically by a direct or persistent approach (e.g. hawkers touting)

331

decommission

withdraw (something, especially weapons or military equipment) from service (e.g. the decommissioned fighter will be deployed once again)