benign mesenchymal neoplasms 1 & 2 Flashcards Preview

oral path 2, exam 2 > benign mesenchymal neoplasms 1 & 2 > Flashcards

Flashcards in benign mesenchymal neoplasms 1 & 2 Deck (45)
Loading flashcards...
1
Q

a __________ is a Collagen deposition secondary to chronic trauma

A

Fibroma

2
Q

where are fibromas usually found? what are their clinical/histological characteristics?

A

A) found on Buccal mucosa, tongue

B) Smooth-surfaced, dome-shaped nodule clinically

C) Dense fibrous connective tissue histopathologically

3
Q

what is the most common treatment for Fibromas?

A

Conservative excision

4
Q

“Inflammatory Fibrous Hyperplasia” is also known by what other names?

A

Also known as denture epulis, epulis fissuratum, or denture-induced fibrous hyperplasia

5
Q

what is the major cause of Inflammatory fibrous dysplasia? what are the clinical characteristics? what treatments are available?

A

A) Cause = Flange of ill-fitting denture

B) clinically, they may have central fissure

C) Conservative excision; re-make denture

6
Q

characteristics of Denture papillomatosis:

A

A) form of Inflammatory Fibrous Dysplasia
B) happens on maxillary complete denture
C) effects central region of hard palatal mucosa
D) Numerous asymptomatic RED PAPULES

7
Q

what are the clinical characteristics of Pyogenic Granuloma? where can they be found?

A
  • Rapidly growing, painless, reddish mass
  • Any body surface; bleeds easily
  • Gingiva, lips, tongue commonly effected
  • Frequently occurs during pregnancy
8
Q

what are the histological characteristics of Pyogenic Granulomas? what is the treatment protocol for them

A

Microscopically: granulation tissue

Excise, remove irritants; 15% recur

9
Q

what are the clinical & histological findings for Peripheral giant cell granulomas?

A

A) Painless mass with a dusky-purple hue

B) Microscopically: granulation tissue with numerous benign multinucleated giant cells

10
Q

where are Peripheral Giant Cell Granulomas found?

A

Found ONLY on the gingivae and alveolar process

11
Q

what is the treatment protocol for peripheral giant cell granulomas?

A

Excise, remove irritants; 15% recur

12
Q

_______________ are painless, firm, coral-colored masses found on the gingiva

A

Peripheral Ossifying Fibroma

13
Q

what is the microscopic structure of a Peripheral Ossifying Fibroma?

A

cellular fibrous connective tissue with variable amounts of calcification

14
Q

T/F: the treatment for Peripheral Ossifying Fibromas is the exact same as the treatment for Peripheral Giant cell Granuloma

A

TRUE

Excise, remove irritants; 15% recur

15
Q

what is the definition of a “Lipoma”?

A

Benign tumor of adipose tissue

16
Q

what group is at risk for Lipomas? what are the clinical characteristics?

A

A) Adult patients
B) Slow-growing, non-tender, soft, doughy, usually encapsulated
C) Common in head and neck; occasionally found intraorally
D) Yellow if close to the surface

17
Q

what are the histopathological finding for Lipomas?

A

Demarcated or encapsulated collection of mature fat cells

18
Q

Treatment protocol for Lipomas:

A
  • Enucleation or conservative surgical excision
  • Virtually no tendency to recur
  • No evidence of malignant transformation
19
Q

_______________ Represents an uncommon reaction to the sectioning of a nerve

A

Traumatic Neuroma

20
Q

Clinical characteristics of Traumatic Neuromas:

A
  • Smooth-surfaced, dome-shaped papule, usually less than one cm.
  • Tongue, buccal vestibule are often affected
  • May be tender on palpation
21
Q

what are the histological characteristics of Traumatic neuromas?

A
  • Microscopically, a tangled mass of peripheral nerve fibers is seen
  • Usually set in a collagenous background
22
Q

a ____________ is a benign tumor of schwann cell origin

A

Neurilomoma (Schwannoma)

23
Q

clinical characteristics of Neurilomomas

A

A) Most are identified in adults
B) Slow-growing, solitary, encapsulated, rubbery-firm, non-tender mass
C) Lips, tongue, buccal mucosa
D) May be seen within the mandible

24
Q

General histological characteristics of Neurilomomas:

A

Well-developed connective tissue capsule

Benign proliferation of spindle-shaped schwann cells

Presene of Antoni Patterns (A & B)

25
Q

what types of “Antoni patterns” are seen in Neurilomomas? Describe each

A

A) Antoni A and Antoni B patterns are seen

B) Antoni A featuring palisaded nuclei arranged around acellular hyaline material (Verocay bodies)

C) Antoni B more disorganized, myxoid

26
Q

what are the treatment options for a Neurilemoma?

A
  • Treatment consists of conservative excision
  • Lesion usually “shells out” due to dense connective tissue capsule
  • Virtually no tendency to recur
  • Extremely rare malignant transformation
27
Q

what lesion is defined as a “Benign tumor of neural fibroblast origin”

A

Neurofibroma

28
Q

what are the clinical characteristics of Neurofibromas?

A

A) Over 90% are solitary; most of remainder are multiple and associated with neurofibromatosis

B) Soft, dome-shaped, non-tender, superficial nodule affecting skin or mucosa

C) Demarcated, but unencapsulated

29
Q

T/F: in Neurofibroma lesions, lesional tissue tends to mingle with the adjacent normal tissue

A

true

30
Q

Treatment/prognosis/reoccurance of Neurofibromas:

A

A) Treatment consists of simple, conservative excision

B) Prognosis is generally good

C) Uncommon possibility of malignant transformation to malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor; especially rare for small, superficial lesions

31
Q

A ____________ lesion is one of the most common autosomal DOMINANT genetic problems that affects humans

A

Neurofibromatosis

32
Q

what is the prevalence of Neurofibromatosis?

How many children are born with it

A

approximately 1 in 3,000 live births

33
Q

how is Neurofibromatosis inherited?

A

Approximately half are transmitted as autosomal dominant trait; other half appear to be new mutations

34
Q

T/F: due to highly variable gene expression, some cases of Neurofibromatosis are very mild, others are quite severe

A

True

35
Q

A mutation of what gene can cause Neurofibromatosis?

A

NF1 gene (17q11.2), neurofibromin, acts as a tumor suppressor

36
Q

what are the skin lesions associated with Neurofibromatosis?

A

A) Café-au-lait spots

B) Light brown (the color of coffee with milk) macules with smooth (“coast of California”) borders

C) Usually 6 or more, greater than 1.5 cm in the adult patient

37
Q

where are the oral lesions associated with Neurofibromatosis found?

A

neurofibromas may affect the tongue, gingivae or bone

38
Q

what are the possible treatments for Neurofibromatosis?

A

Treatment consists of:

1) removing traumatized neurofibromas or disfiguring lesions
2) Genetic counseling
3) Follow for potential malignant transformation

39
Q

what is the prognosis for neurofibromatosis?

A
  • Prognosis should be considered fair to guarded

- If malignant transformation occurs, prognosis is poor

40
Q

__________________ is a rare tumor seen in the first 2-3 years of life

A

Melanotic Neuroectodermal Tumor of Infancy

41
Q

clinical characteristics of Melanotic Neuroectodermal Tumor of Infancy

A

1) Most develop in the anterior maxilla
2) Rapid growth
3) May be brown, black or purplish in color

42
Q

name the radiographic findings of Melanotic Neuroectodermal tumors of infancy

A

A) Radiographic appearance is characteristic

B) Radiolucency of anterior maxilla

C) Deciduous maxillary incisor is pushed labially, appearing as a “tooth floating in space”

43
Q

Histological characteristics of Melanotic Neuroectodermal tumors of infancy

A

A) Proliferation of small, dark, neuroectodermal-appearing cells that are in nested aggregates

B) Surrounded by plump, epithelioid cells that produce melanin

44
Q

Treatment/prognosis/risks for Melanotic Neuroextodermal tumors of infancy

A

1) Conservative excision is usually curative
2) Good prognosis
3) Sporadic reports of aggressive behavior are probably over-represented in the literature

45
Q

what are the histological characteristics of Neurofibromas?

A

A) Collection of fibroblastic cells that have wavy nuclei

B) Usually quite a few mast cells are seen within the lesion

C) Lesional tissue tends to mingle with the adjacent normal tissue