CAE Exam Preparation Flashcards Preview

CAE > CAE Exam Preparation > Flashcards

Flashcards in CAE Exam Preparation Deck (1764)
Loading flashcards...
1561

Varnish (v)

› To put varnish on a ​surface:
They ​decided to ​spend the ​weekend varnishing ​their ​boat.
› UK to use ​nail varnish

1562

Gifted (adj)

› ​Having ​special ​ability in a ​particular ​subject or ​activity:
a gifted ​dancer/​musician

› ​Clever, or having a ​special ​ability:
Schools often ​fail to ​meet the ​needs of gifted ​children.

1563

Die out

To ​become less ​common and ​finally ​stop ​existing:
Dinosaurs ​died out millions of ​years ago.
It's a ​custom that is ​beginning to ​die out.

1564

Be lost for words

To be so ​shocked, ​surprised, ​full of ​admiration, etc. that you cannot ​speak:
Mary was lost for words when she was ​awarded the ​prize.

1565

Be/get carried away

B2 to ​become so ​excited about something that you do not ​control what you say or do:
There's ​far too much ​food - I'm ​afraid I got a ​bit ​carried away.
The ​manager ​warned his ​young ​players not to get ​carried away by the ​emotion of the ​occasion.
› to ​cause someone to ​become very ​excited and to ​lose ​control:
The ​crowd were ​carried away by his ​passionate ​speech.

1566

In any case

Also:
I don't ​want to go and in any case, I haven't been ​invited.

1567

What's more

Used to ​add something ​surprising or ​interesting to what you have just said:
The ​decorations were ​absolutely ​beautiful and what's more, the ​children had made them themselves.

1568

Words with "some"

• somehow - in some way/by some means
• somewhere - an unspecified place
• someone/somebody - a person but we don't know who
• sometime - a time but we are not sure when
• somewhat - a little bit/a moderate amount
• something - a thing but we are not sure what
• someday - a day but we are not sure which

1569

Be fond of sb/sth

To like someone or something very much; to like doing something:
She was very fond of ​horses.
"I'm very fond of you, you ​know," he said.
My ​brother is fond of ​pointing out my ​mistakes.

1570

Belittle (v)

To make a ​person or an ​action ​seem as if he, she or it is not ​important:
Though she had ​spent ​hours ​fixing the ​computer, he belittled her ​efforts.
Stop belittling ​your​self - ​your ​work is ​highly ​valued.

1571

Camaraderie (n)

A ​feeling of ​friendliness towards ​people that you ​work or ​share an ​experience with:
When you've been ​climbing ​alone for ​hours, there's a ​tremendous ​sense of camaraderie when you ​meet another ​climber.

1572

Outbid (v)

To ​offer to ​pay a ​higher ​price for something than someone ​else, ​especially at an ​auction (= ​public ​sale):
The ​retail ​group outbid all three ​competitors for ​space in the ​shopping ​centre.

1573

It is very ........ to see the patient making such good progress.

Encouraging

1574

I don't think Helen wants to hear about your operation so could we drop the ........?

Subject

Drop it/the subject: to ​stop ​talking about something, ​especially because it is ​upsetting or ​annoying:
I don't ​want to ​talk about it any more - let's drop the ​subject.

1575

The company were very keen to dissociate themselves ........ the shamed director to avoid any bad publicity.

From

1576

The cult had quite a large ........ and had been in the public eye on several occasions before. (FOLLOW)

Following

Following noun [S] (PEOPLE)
› a ​group of ​people who ​admire something or someone:
She has ​attracted a ​large following among the ​rich and ​famous.
The ​shop has a ​small but ​loyal/​devoted following.
› a ​group of ​people who ​support, ​admire, or ​believe in a ​particular ​person, ​group, or ​idea

1577

Rote learning

Learning something in ​order to be ​able to ​repeat it from ​memory, ​rather than in ​order to ​understand it

1578

I think we are going to need a ........ meeting to discuss these matters further. (FOLLOW)

Follow-up
Follow-up: a ​further ​action ​connected with something that ​happened before:
This ​meeting is a follow-up to the one we had last ​month.

1579

My parents were always ........ me from going into the theatre as a profession. They wanted me to be a doctor. (ENCOURAGE)

Discouraging

1580

Our teacher gives us loads of ........ when we feel a little fed up with our lessons. She really knows how to motivate us. (ENCOURAGE)

Encouragement

1581

Learn sth by rote [usually disapproving]

To ​learn something in ​order to be ​able to ​repeat it from ​memory, ​rather than in ​order to ​understand it:
She ​learned the ​equations by rote.

1582

Jog your memory

To ​cause you to ​remember something:
Seeing her again ​jogged my ​memory, and I ​recalled my ​life as a ​child on a ​farm in Minnesota.

1583

The company were very keen to dissociate themselves ........ the shamed director to avoid any bad publicity.

From

1584

The cult had quite a large ........ and had been in the public eye on several occasions before. (FOLLOW)

Following

Following noun [S] (PEOPLE)
› a ​group of ​people who ​admire something or someone:
She has ​attracted a ​large following among the ​rich and ​famous.
The ​shop has a ​small but ​loyal/​devoted following.
› a ​group of ​people who ​support, ​admire, or ​believe in a ​particular ​person, ​group, or ​idea

1585

Many of her ........ claimed she had mystical powers. (FOLLOW)

Followers

1586

I think we are going to need a ........ meeting to discuss these matters further. (FOLLOW)

Follow-up
Follow-up: a ​further ​action ​connected with something that ​happened before:
This ​meeting is a follow-up to the one we had last ​month.

1587

1. As the clock ........ twelve I felt quite nervous alone in the house.

2. He ........ a match to try to see where he was going.

3. I ........ your name off the list as you'd told me you didn't want to go on the tour after all.

Struck

› [I or T] When a ​clock strikes, ​its ​bells ​ring to show what the ​time is:
The ​clock was striking ten as we went into the ​church.

C2 [T] If you strike a ​match, you ​cause it to ​burn by ​rubbing it against a hard ​rough ​surface:
She struck a ​match and ​lit another ​cigarette.
He ​bent and struck a ​match on the ​sole of his ​boot.

strike verb (REMOVE)
› [T usually + adv/prep] formal to ​remove something ​officially from a ​document:
Please strike my ​name from ​your ​mailing ​list ​immediately.
Several ​unreliable ​dealers have been struck off ​our ​list of ​authorized ​suppliers.

1588

Rote learning

Learning something in ​order to be ​able to ​repeat it from ​memory, ​rather than in ​order to ​understand it

1589

Learn sth by rote [usually disapproving]

To ​learn something in ​order to be ​able to ​repeat it from ​memory, ​rather than in ​order to ​understand it:
She ​learned the ​equations by rote.

1590

Jog your memory

to ​cause you to ​remember something:
Seeing her again ​jogged my ​memory, and I ​recalled my ​life as a ​child on a ​farm in Minnesota.