Chapter 10 - Motivating Students to Learn Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Chapter 10 - Motivating Students to Learn Deck (16):
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Motivation

The influence of needs and desires on the intensity and direction of behavior.

1

Deficiency Needs

Basic requirements for physical and psychological well-being as identified by Maslow.

2

Growth Needs

Needs for knowing, appreciating, and understanding, which people try to satisfy after their basic needs are met.

3

Self-Actualization

A person's ability to develop his or her full potential.

4

Attribution Theory

A theory of motivation that focuses on how people explain the causes of their own successes and failures.

5

Locus of Control

A personality trait that determines whether people attribute responsibility for their own failure or success to internal or external factors.

6

Expectancy Theory

A theory of motivation based on the belief that people's efforts to achieve depend on their expectations of reward.

7

Expectancy-Valence Model

A theory that relates the probability and the incentive value of success to motivation.

8

Achievement Motivation

The desire to experience success and to participate in activities in which success depends on personal effort and abilities.

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Learning Goals

The goals of students who are motivated primarily by desire for knowledge acquisition and self-improvement. Also called mastery goals.

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Performance Goals

The goals of students who are motivated primarily by a desire to gain recognition from others and to earn good grades.

11

Learned Helplessness

The expectation, based on experience, that one's actions will ultimately lead to failure.

12

Intrinsic Incentive

An aspect of an activity that people enjoy and, therefore, find motivating.

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Extrinsic Incentive

A reward that is external to the activity, such as recognition or a good grade.

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Feedback

Information on the results of one's efforts.

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Contingent Praise

Praise that is effective because it refers directly to specific task performances.