Drugs your patient may be taking! Flashcards Preview

Pharmacology > Drugs your patient may be taking! > Flashcards

Flashcards in Drugs your patient may be taking! Deck (18)
Loading flashcards...
1

Midodrine: What kind of a action and why do they take it?

1. Alpha 1 agonist
2. Postural hypotension
NON-Catecholamine
Direct Acting

2

Oxymetazoline tetrahydrozolone and xylometazoline: What kind of action and why do they take it?

1. Alpha 1 agonist
2. Nasal and ocular decongestion
NON-Catecholamine
Direct acting

3

Clonidine: What kind of action and why do they take it?

Partial alpha 2 selective agonist.
Decreased SNS output from CNS so decreases BP, sedation and analgesia.

4

What kind or half life dose clonidine have compared to dex?

Longer

5

What kind of action does dex have?

Full alpha 2 agonist.

6

Methyldopa: what kind of action?

selective A2 agonist.

7

Are amphetamines direct or indirect acting?

Indirect.

8

What four things happen when a person takes amphetamines?

1. Increased release of NE, 5HT and DA.
2. Blocks reuptake
3. Blocks vesicular transport
4. Inhibits MAO

9

Methamphetamine is similar to amphetamines but more dangerous how?

Higher CNS effects.

10

Methylphenidate (ritalin) and permoline (cylert) are variants of? For what?

Amphetamine
ADHD.

11

What results from reserpine? What is common with this drug?

Vesicles lose the ability to store NE, 5HT and DA. MAO breaks down excess except in high doses.
Hypotension and psychiatric depression.

12

Cocaine messes with catecholamines how?

1. Prevents reuptake of NE, DA and 5HT
2. Interferes with catecholamine transport.

13

Prazosin: What receptors? When is it used?

1. Selective alpha 1 blocker (minimal alpha 2)
2. Less reflexive tachycardia
3. Control of BP in pheochromocytoma

14

Yohimibine: What receptors? When is it used? What do we need to remember?

1. Selective alpha 2 blocker
2. Increases the release of NE from the post-synaptic neuron
3. Used with orthostatic hypotension, impotence.

*Classical stores may be different, these patients could be more labile and tricky to manage.

15

Terazosin and Tamulosin: When are they used? How do they work?

1. BPH
2. Long acting selective alpha-1a (pretty darn specific) particularly effective in prostatic smooth muscle relaxation

* no hypotension.

16

Timolol

1. Non selective beta blocker
2. Used to treat glaucoma- decreased IOP by decreasing production of aqueous humor (b2)
3. Eye drops can cause decreased BP, decreased HR and increased airway resistance.

17

Nandolol

1. non selective beta blocker
2. E1/2 time of 20-40 hours

18

Betaxolol

1. Cardioselective B1 blocker
2. E1/2 is 11-22 hours
3. Single dose daily for HTN
4. Topical used for glaucoma, with less risk of bonchospasm as seen with timolol so good alternative choice in asthmatics with glaucoma.