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Flashcards in DRVs Deck (34):
1

What is a good nutritional status associated with (2)

Diet that supplies the required amount of nutrients
Without excessive storage

2

What is a poor nutritional status associated with

Intakes that are insufficient to meet requirements

3

What is meant by a balanced diet?(3)

All necessary nutrients are supplied in the required amounts
Variation of foods
Provides a balance between supply and demand

4

Supply

Any means through which nutrients are made available to meet demand

5

What does supply include?(3)

Intake from food
Stores of nutrients that can be mobilised within body
De novo synthesis within body

6

Demands

Any physiological or metabolic process that utilises nutrients

7

Examples of demand (6)

Energy releasing substrate
Enzyme cofactor
Structural component of tissues
Substrate for synthesis of macromolecules
A transport element
Component for cell-cell signalling

8

Under nutrition

Demand for nutrient exceeds supply

9

What causes undernutrition?(2)

High demands
Low intakes

10

Consequences of undernutrition (2)

Malnutrition
Nutrient deficiency

11

What is over nutrition?

Supply of nutrient exceeds demand

12

What causes over nutrition (4)

Intake of foods containing the nutrient increases above demand
Inappropriate change in dietary behaviour
Intake of unnecessary supplements
Nutrient demand decreases with no dietary change

13

Potential consequences of over nutrition (4)

Excess storage - e.g. adipose tissue
Excess secretion may damage kidneys
May be toxic
May reduce absorption of other nutrients

14

Factors that influence nutrient requirements (7)

Sex
Age
Body comp
PA
Lactation
Pregnancy
Illness/trauma

15

Why are dietary standards needed?(5)

Assess the adequacy of a population's diet
Provide guidance for individuals
Provide food labelling information
Enable government planning of food supply
Maintain good nutritional status

16

Define dietary reference values (DRV)

A general term which covers all figures of EAR, RNI AND LRNI

17

Define estimated average requirements (EAR)

The estimated average requirement of a group for a particular nutrient or energy

18

Reference nutrient intake (RNI) (3)

The amount of a nutrient (mean + SD) which is sufficient for almost all individuals
It exceeds the requirements of most people

19

Lower reference nutrient intake (LRNI) (2)

The amount of a nutrient (mean - SD) which is sufficient for only a few individuals

20

What are DRVs poorly suited for?

Assessing diets of individuals

21

What are DRVs useful for?(2)

Assessing diets of populations
Food labelling purposes

22

What are safe intakes

Level of intake that is considered to be a low risk for deficiency and/or toxicity

23

When are safe intakes used?

If there is too little data to set typical DRVs

24

Examples of nutrients that have been set safe intakes (2)

Biotin
Pantothenic acid

25

Define nutritional status

The state of an individual's health in relation to the nutrients in their diet and availability within their body

26

% of total energy from dietary fats (3)

Sat fats: 10
Trans fats: 2
Total fats: 35%

27

% of total energy from carbs (2)

Free sugars: 5
Total carbs: 50

28

Guidelines for healthy eating (6)

Base meals on starchy foods
At least 5 fruit and veg a day
Eat more fish
Cut down on sat fat and sugar
Eat less salt
Don't get thirsty

29

How much water should we drink daily?(2)

6 to 8 glasses of water
1.6 to 2L

30

How much alcohol should men and women drink a day

Women - 2-3 units
Men - 3-4 units

31

How many alcohol free days should there be?

2-3

32

Maximum sugars intake per day for 4-6 year old (2)

19g
3-5 teaspoons

33

Maximum sugars intake per day for 7-10 year old (2)

24g
4-6 teaspoons

34

Maximum sugars intake per day for 11 years and above (2)

30g
5-7 teaspoons