Essential Units 15-21 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Essential Units 15-21 Deck (70):
1

Coda

Coda (n)

Concluding part of a literacy or musical composition; something that summarizes or concludes.

The coda of the Danish composer per Norgand's sixth symphony seems to return to the serene sounds of the opening.

2

Codify

Codify (v)

To systematize

The state legislature voted to codify regulations governing banking fraud.

Codification is the noun

3

Cognizant

Cognizant (adj)

Informed; conscious; aware

We saw a story about a husband and wife in straightened circumstances each sacrifice to buy Christmas presents for the other, not cognizant of what the other is doing.

4

Collage

Collage (n)

Artistic composition of materials pasted over a surface; an assemblage of diverse elements

5

Commensurate

Commensurate (adj)

Proportional

In the United States, malpractice suits have raised the cost of medicine because doctors must pay for insurance, and thus increase their fees commensurately.

6

Compendium

Compendium (n)

Brief, comprehensive summary

The Mozart compendium; a guide to Mozart's life and music.

7

Complacent

Complacent (adj)

Self-satisfied

Although tom received an "A" on his midterm exam, professor Donovan warned him not to become complacent since the work in the second term would be harder.

8

Complaisant

Complaisant (adj)

Overly polite; willing to please; obliging

Although France and Germany have a close relationship, neither would consider the other a complaisant ally.

9

Complement

Complement (n)

Something that completes or makes up a whole.

Some people envision chess developing into a game between teams of humans and computers, each complementing the other.

10

Coalesce

Coalesce (v)

To cause to become one

JFK must be vigilant so that the interests of business and the military do not coalesce and thus undermine those of society as a whole.

11

Compliant

Compliant (adj)

Yielding

The young negotiator is trying to learn the skill of being open to proposals by the other side without seeming too compliant.

12

Compunction

Compunction (n)

Uneasiness caused by guilt

The American psychiatrist Frank Pittman said, "Men who have been raised violently have every reason to believe it is appropriate for them to control others through violence; they feel no compunction over being violent to women, children, and one another.

13

Concave

Concave (adj)

Curving inward

Concave lenses are used in glasses to compensate for myopia (nearsightedness)

14

Conciliatory

Conciliatory (adj)

Overcoming distrust or hostility

The leader of the country made conciliatory statements assuring the world that his country did not intend to acquire nuclear weapons.

15

Concoct

Concoct (v)

To invent

The various human cultures have concocted a great many explanations to describe the beginning of the Earth, life, and humanity.

16

Concomitant

Concomitant (n)

Existing concurrently

A rebuild of the argument that Homo sapiens higher cognitive functions could not be the result solely of evolution is that such abilities arose as concomitants of language, which gave early hominids a tremendous advantage over other species.

17

Condone

Condone (v)

To overlook voluntarily; forgive

Mahatma Gandhi believed in the principle of ahimsa and refused to condone violence of any kind, even if used in a just cause.

18

Confound

Confound (v)

To baffle; perplex; mix up

Everyone but astrophysicists seems to be confounded by the question, "what happened before the Big Bang?"

19

Congenial

Congenial (adj)

Similar in tastes and habits; friendly; suited to the physicist Freeman Dyson has expressed his awe at how congenial the universe is to intelligent life and consciousness.

20

Conjugal

Conjugal (adj)

Pertaining to marriage agreement

The goal of the Bennett sisters in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice is to find a suitable man to marry with whom they they can live in conjugal happiness.

21

Connoisseur

Connoisseur (n)

A person completely possessing expert knowledge or training; a person of informed and discriminating taste.

The art connoisseur selected works by Van Gogh, Rembrandt, and Picasso for the exhibition.

22

Conscript

Conscript (n)

Person compulsorily enrolled for military service

23

Consecrate

Consecrate (v)

To declare sacred

The brave men that died here have consecrated this ground.

24

Contentious

Contentious (adj)

Quarrelsome; causing quarrels

When genetic engineering began in the 1970's, there was a contentious, and sometimes acrimonious, debate among scientists themselves about it's dangers.

25

Contiguous

Contiguous (adj)

Touching; neighboring; connecting without a break

There are forty-eight contiguous states in the USA.

26

Continence

Continence (n)

Self-control; abstention from sexual activity

27

Contrite

Contrite (adj)

Very sorrowful for a wrong

In sentencing the convicted man to a life sentence, the judge took into account that he didn't seem contrite about his offenses.

28

Contumacious

Contumacious (adj)

Disobedient; rebellious

In the late 18th century, Great Britain tried unsuccessfully to put down the uprising against their rule by contumacious Americans.

29

Conundrum

Conundrum (n)

Riddle; puzzle with no solution.

30

Contend

Contend (v)

To assert

The study's contention is that obesity is America's biggest health problem.

31

Convention

Convention (n)

Practice widely observed in a group; custom; accepted technique or device

The work of French artist Henri Rousseau demonstrates a naïveté that many people find more attractive than the sophistication of highly complex works that make use of all the conventions of their genre.

32

Converge

Converge (v)

To approach; come together; tend to meet

Although the peoples republic of China and India are rivals in many ways, in certain areas their interests converge.

33

Convex

Convex (adj)

Curved outward

34

Convivial

Convivial (adj)

Sociable

One of the jobs of an ambassador is to provide a convivial atmosphere for diplomats to meet.

35

Convoluted

Convoluted (adj)

Twisted; complicated

Unraveling the convoluted genetic code is one of the great achievements of modern science.

36

Copious

Copious (adj)

Abundant; plentiful

The copious rainfall was welcomed by farmers in the parched land.

37

Coquette

Coquette (n)

Woman who flirts

After she had played the cart of coquette in the college play. Pans boyfriend reminded her that real life is different from theater.

38

Cornucopia

Cornucopia (n)

Horn overflowing with fruit and grain; state of abundance

The U.S. Economy has produced a cornucopia of employment opportunities.

39

Cosmology

Cosmology (n)

Study of the universe as a totality; theory of the origin and structure of the universe.

Cosmos and cosmic

40

Covert

Covert (adj)

Hidden; secret

The CIA gathers information about foreign intelligence through many means, including covert ones.

41

Covetous

Covetous (adj)

Desiring something owner by another

The astronomer is covetous of the time that his colleague gets for research using the Hubble space telescope.

Cover is the verb

42

Cozen

Cozen (v)

To mislead by trick or fraud; deceive

The writer H.L. Mencken pointed out that a common strategy of politicians is to Cozen the people by exaggerating the seriousness of a problem and then offering a solution that, conveniently, only they can provide.

43

Craven

Craven (adj)

Cowardly

In the Hindu epic poem the Bhagavad-Gita, Lord Krishna warns the hero, who is reluctant to fight, that refusing to fight would be a craven act.

44

Credence

Credence (n)

Acceptance of something true

People will be less likely to give credence to future alarms raised by that person.

45

Credo

Credo (n)

Statement of belief or principle; creed

The credo of Google is "Don't be evil."

46

Daunt

Daunt (v)

To discourage; intimidate; dishearten

Do not let the difficulty of learning the 800 words for the GRE daunt you.

Daunting

47

Dearth

Dearth (n)

Scarcity

Leaving a dearth of resources is obviously bad

48

Debauchery

Debauchery (n)

Corruption

The prince lived a life of debauchery until he discovered a spiritual dimension to live.

49

Decorum

Decorum (n)

Proper behavior

When addressing the nation, the president generally has an air of decorum

Decorous (adj)

50

Defame

Defame (v)

To malign; harm someone's reputation

51

Default

Default (v)

To fail to act

Defaulting on a loan

52

Deference

Deference (n)

Respect; regard for a others wish

Despite many misguidings, the proposal was dropped in deference to the objections of a number of people.

Deferred

53

Defunct

Defunct (adj)

No longer existing

Moored law will soon become defunct.

54

Delineate

Delineate (v)

To represent or depict

Quantum theory led to the formulation of the uncertainty principle which was delineated in 1937 by Werner Heisenberg.

55

Demographic

Demographic (adj)

Related to population balance

56

Demotic

Demotic (adj)

Pertaining to people

One critic praised him as a poet who was able to make the demotic sing.

57

Demur

Demur (v)

To express doubt

One justice demurred, saying that the majority decision used specious reasoning.

58

Denigrate

Denigrate (v)

To slur someone's reputation

According to a recent biography of Napoleon, the famous leader felt a need to denigrate women.

59

Denizen

Denizen (n)

An inhabitant; a regular visitor

The US census bureau has a responsibility of collecting information about the denizens of the United States.

60

Denouement

Denouement (n)

Outcome; unravelling of the plot of a play or work of literature.

The book tells the story of what was for Europe a rather embarrassing denouement to the crusades.

61

Deride

Deride (v)

To mock

Companies with innumerable research breakthroughs to their credit- and were derided as impractical visionaries.

62

Derivative

Derivative (n)

Something derived; unoriginal

Morphine is the principal derivative of opium.

63

Desiccate

Desiccate (v)

To dry completely

The dry desert air caused the bodies of the dead animals to desiccate quickly.

64

Desuetude

Desuetude (n)

State of disuse

NASA, is considering a plan to refurbish booster rockets from the Apollo program that have fallen into desuetude.

65

Desultory

Desultory (adj)

Random; disconnected; rambling

The jury had difficulty following the witnesses desultory testimony.

66

Deterrent

Deterrent (n)

Something that discourages or hinders

67

Detraction

Detraction (n)

The act of taking away; derogatory comment on a person's character

The writer responded in a letter to the critics long list of detractions about his book

68

Diaphanous

Diaphanous (adj)

transparent; fine-textured; insubstantial; vague

In world war 2, many soldiers went to war with diaphanous dreams of glory, but found instead horror and death.

69

Diatribe

Diatribe (n)

Bitter verbal attack

The speaker launched into a diatribe against what he called, "the evils of technology"

70

Dichotomy

Dichotomy (n)

Division into two usually contradictory parts

The philosopher is a dualist who argues that there is a dichotomy between the mind and physical phenomena.