Essential Units 29-35 Flashcards Preview

GRE Essential > Essential Units 29-35 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Essential Units 29-35 Deck (62):
1

Ethnocentric

Ethnocentric (adj)

Based on the attitude that ones group is superior.

Ethnocentrism (noun)

2

Etiology

Etiology (n)

Causes or origins

The etiology of mental illness is complex because of the diversity of factors- social, biological, genetic, and psychological- that contribute to many disorders.

3

Etymology

Etymology (n)

Origin and history of a word

4

Eugenics

Eugenics (n)

Study of factors that influence the hereditary qualities of the human race and ways to improve these qualities

Science fiction books create worlds where military eugenics create super humans.

5

Eulogy

Eulogy (n)

High praise, especially of a person who has recently died

6

Euphemism

Euphemism (n)

Use of agreeable or inoffensive language in place of unpleasant or offensive language.

A few extra points

An "escort"

7

Oratory

Oratory

noun

skill or eloquence in public speaking: The evangelist moved thousands to repentance with his oratory.

the art of public speaking, especially in a formal and eloquent manner.

8

Euphoria

Euphoria (n)

A feeling of extreme happiness

9

Euthanasia

Euthanasia (n)

Mercy killing

10

Evince

Evince (v)

To show plainly; be an indication of

The student's response to the teachers question evinced his ignorance of the subject.

11

Evocative

Evocative (adj)

Tending to call to mind or produce a reaction

Mr. Maughams short stories are often evocative of exotic places such as Pago-Pago and Gibraltar

To evoke (v)

Evocation (noun)

12

Exacerbate

Exacerbate (v)

To aggravate; make worse

He exacerbated the problem

13

Exact

Exact (v)

To force the payment of; demand and obtain by authority

The conquering rulers exacted a tax of 10% from every adult make in the country

Exacting (adj)

14

Exculpate

Exculpate (v)

To clear of blame; vindicate

The report Exculpate the FBI of any wrongdoing in it's handling of the investigation.

15

Execrable

Execrable (adj)

Detestable; abhorrent

When folk artists such as bob Dylan began to use rock instruments, many folk music traditionalists considered it an execrable travesty.

16

Exhort

Exhort (v)

To urge by strong appeals

17

Exigency

Exigency (n)

Crisis; urgent requirements

Astronauts must be prepared for exigencies such as damage to their spacecrafts life support system.

18

Existential

Existential (adj)

Have to do with existence; based in experience; have to do with the philosophy of existentialism

19

Exorcise

Exorcise (v)

To expel evil spirits; free from bad influences

20

Expatiate

Expatiate (v)

To speak or write at length

Every year the book club invites a famous author to come to expatiate on the art of writing.

21

Expatriate

Expatriate (v)

To send into exile

22

Expiate

Expiate (v)

To atone for

The pilgrims undertook their long journey to expiate their sins

Expiation is the noun

23

Explicate

Explicate (v)

To explain; interpret; clarify

The literature exam requires students to explicate three poems they studied in class and one they have not studied.

Explication is the noun

24

Expository

Expository (adj)

Explanatory

There no one model of expository prose that student can emulate, since each piece of good writing is unique.

25

Extant

Extant (adj)

In existence; not lost

Unfortunately for Bible scholars, there are no extant writings of Jesus Christ.

26

Extemporaneous

Extemporaneous (adj)

Unrehearsed

I enjoyed the speaker's extemporaneous remarks.

27

Extirpate

Extirpate (v)

To root up; to destroy

The new federal prosecutor promised voters that he would extirpate corruption in the state.

28

Extraneous

Extraneous (adj)

Not essential

The encyclopedia editors worked hard to cut out extraneous material so that readers could find information easily on a given subject.

29

Extrapolation

Extrapolation (n)

The act of estimation by projecting known information

The economists extrapolation suggests that the economy will grow in the next 4 years.

The verb is extrapolate

30

Extrinsic

Extrinsic (adj)

Not inherent or essential

The experiment is designed to exclude factors that are extrinsic to the phenomenon.

31

Facetious

Facetious (adj)

Humorous

The comedians facetious comments about prominent politicians kept the audience amused.

32

Facilitate

Facilitate (v)

To make less difficult

The internet- together with the availability of relatively inexpensive personal computers- has greatly facilitated the ability of ordinary people to conveniently exchange information.

33

Factotum

Factotum (n)

A person who does all sorts of work; a handyman

34

Fallacious

Fallacious (adj)

Based on a false idea or fact; misleading

The belief of the Nazis that they could create a "master race" was based on the fallacious premise that some races are inherently superior to others.

Fallacy (n)

35

Fallow

Fallow (adj)

Plowed but not sowed; uncultivated

At the beginning of each school year the teacher looks out at the new students and thinks of a fallow field, ready to be cultivated.

36

Fatuous

Fatuous (adj)

Foolishly self-satisfied

The student could not understand why no one took seriously his fatuous comments.

37

Fauna

Fauna (n)

animals of a period or region

38

Fawning

Fawning (adj)

Seeking favor by flattering

The boss has a reputation for hiring fawning employees.

39

Felicitous

Felicitous (adj)

Suitably expressed; appropriate; well-chosen

The Gettysburg Address is full of felicitous phrases such as "government of the people, by the people, and for the people."

40

Feral

Feral (adj)

Existing in a wild or untamed state

41

Fervor

Fervor (n)

Warmth and and intensity of emotion

American soldiers were welcomed back to the USA with fervor after the end of world war 2.

Fervent (adj) full of strong emotion

42

Jaunt

Jaunt (n)

An fun short trip

43

Finesse

Finesse (V)

To handle with a deceptive or evasive strategy; to use finesse, that is, refinement in performance

Engineers decided that the problem could be finessed by using lighter materials.

44

Fissure

Fissure (n)

Crevice

Geologist measure the width of the fissure regularly to monitor movement of the Earth's plates in the area.

45

Flag

Flag (v)

To droop; grow weak

Noticing that the students's attention was flagging, the professor gave them a short break.

46

Fledgling

Fledgling (n)

Beginner; novice

The coach said that some of the team's fledglings would play in Saturdays game.

Fledging (adjective)

Immature

47

Flora

Flora (n)

Plants of a region or era

48

Fetid

Fetid (adj)

Having a bad smell

Many people find the smell of certain cheese fetid.

49

Fetter

Fetter (v)

To bind; confine

The poet William Blake believed that each person creates "mind-forged manacles," fettering his or her natural instincts and spirit.

The noun fetter means something that's restricts or restrains

The adjective fettered means bound or confined.

50

Flat

Flat (n)

Arbitrary order; authorization

The dictator rules almost entirely by flat

51

Fidelity

Fidelity (n)

Loyalty; exact correspondence

Monks joining the Franciscan Order pledge fidelity to the ideals and rules of the Order

52

Filibuster

Filibuster (n)

Use of objective tactics in a legislature to block passage of a law.

The senator threatened that his filibuster would include a full reading of his eight-volume autobiography.

53

Florid

Florid (adj)

Ruddy; reddish: flowery

very fancy or too fancy
having a red or reddish color

As he grew older, the novelist eschewed the florid, ostentatious style of his youth in favor of a more direct and sparse style.

a florid, gilded mirror that took up most of the wall
gave a florid speech in honor of the queen's visit

Origin: Latin floridus blooming, flowery, from florēre.

54

Flourish

Flourish (n)

An embellishment or ornamentation

The sophists often gave interminable speeches full of rhetorical flourishes.

Flourishing is also a verb meaning to grow vigorously, or to thrive.

55

Flout

Flout (v)

To treat scornfully

to break or ignore (a law, rule, etc.) without hiding what you are doing or showing fear or shame

In his book Poetic Meter and Poetic Form, the distinguished literary critic Paul Fussel discusses the dangers poets face when they flout poetic conventions.

56

Flux

Flux (n)

Flowing; a continuous moving

In some cultures, time is conceptualized as a flux moving in one direction.

57

Foment

Foment (v)

To incite; arouse

to cause or try to cause the growth or development of (something bad or harmful)

The government accused the newspaper of tormenting unrest in the country.

58

Forbearance

Forbearance (n)

Patience

the quality of someone who is patient and able to deal with a difficult person or situation without becoming angry

The president warned that great courage and forbearance would be required to see the war through to a successful conclusion.

59

Forestall

Forestall (v)

To prevent; delay

The government took steps to forestall an economic downturn by increasing government spending.

60

Formidable

Formidable (adj)

Menacing; threatening

By the middle of the nineteenth century the United States had become a formidable economic and military power.

61

Forswear

Forswear (v)

Renounce; repudiate

When she became a U.S. citizen, Julia forswore allegiance to all other countries and pledged to defend the United States if called upon to do so.

62

Founder

Founder (v)

To sink; fail; collapse

Most attempts to create advanced new technology by government fiat founder, probably because of the difficulty in anticipating changes in the fluid world of high technology.