Essential Units 22-28 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Essential Units 22-28 Deck (72):
1

Diffuse

Diffuse (v)

To spread out

The idea of equality and liberty diffused through society after the French Revolution.

2

Digression

Digression (n)

Act of straying from the main point

The novel Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Contain many fascinating digressions from the main story that discuss topics such as platonic philosophy.

3

Dirge

Dirge (n)

Funeral hymn

The music critic described the movement of the symphony portraying the here's last days as dirge like.

4

Disabuse

Disabuse (v)

To free from a misconception

The chairman of the federal reserve used his testimony before congress to disabuse his audience of the idea that the business cycle had been eliminated by the unprecedented period of prosperity.

5

Discerning

Discerning (adj)

Perceptive; exhibiting keen insight and good judgement.

6

Discomfit

Discomfit (v)

To make uneasy; disconcert

The young man was discomfited being the only male in the play.

7

Discordant

Discordant (adj)

Not in tune

8

Discredit

Discredit (v)

To dishonor; disgrace; cause to be doubted.

9

Discrepancy

Discrepancy (n)

Difference between

The book studies the discrepancy between x and y.

10

Discrete

Discrete (adj)

Constituting a separate thing; distinct

Like the physicist, the abstract artist strives to identify the discrete elements of reality and to understand how they interact.

11

Discretion

Discretion (n)

Quality of showing of self-restraint in speech or actions; circumspection; freedom to act on ones own.

Gentlemen are expected to behave with discretion.

12

Disingenuous

Disingenuous (adj)

Not candid; crafty

13

Disinterested

Disinterested (adj)

Unprejudiced; objective

14

Diffidence

Diffidence (n)

Shyness; lack of confidence

As a result of the strength of his opposition to the Vietnam War Senator Eugene Mcarthy overcame his diffidence and ran against President Lyndon Johnson for the Democratic nomination for president.

15

Disjointed

Disjointed (adj)

Lacking order or coherence; dislocated

The technique of telling a story through a disjointed narrative is a brilliant technique.

16

Dismiss

Dismiss (v)

To put away from consideration; reject

17

Disparage

Disparage (v)

To belittle

Philosophy is sometimes disparaged as an intellectual game.

18

Disparate

Disparate (adj)

Dissimilar

Many tech projects are interdisciplinary, requiring a knowledge of fields as disparate as physics and biology.

Disparity (noun) - unequal or unlike

19

Dissemble

Dissemble (v)

To pretend; disguise ones motives

I believe you are dissembling. I want you to tell me the truth.

20

Disseminate

Disseminate (v)

To spread; scatter; disperse

The belief of reincarnation disseminated all over India.

21

Dissident

Dissident (n)

Person who disagrees about beliefs

Some of the most notorious concentration camps in history were the gulag camps used by the Soviet Union to control dissidents.

22

Dissolution

Dissolution (n)

Disintegration; debauchery

Some philosophers maintain that the dissolution of the body does not mean the destruction of the mind.

23

Dissonance

Dissonance (n)

Discord; lack of harmony

In psychology, the term cognitive dissonance refers to a conflict between ones beliefs and ones actions.

24

Distend

Distend (v)

To expand; swell out

People in an advanced stage of starvation often have distended bellies.

25

Distill

Distill (v)

Extract the essential elements

He managed to distill the essence of leading thinkers like Martin Luther king.

26

Distrait

Distrait (adj)

In attentive; preoccupied

The chairperson became distrait because his secretary was not sitting in her usual position on his right.

27

Diverge

Diverge (v)

To vary; go in different directions from the same point

The two roads diverged in a wood.

28

Divest

Divest (v)

To strip; deprive; rid

The candidate for secretary of defense pledged to divest himself of the shares he held in defense-related companies.

29

Divulge

Divulge (v)

To make known something that is secret

30

Doctrinaire

Doctrinaire (adj)

Relating to a person who cannot compromise about points of a theory or doctrine; dogmatic; unyielding

31

Document

Document (v)

To provide with written evidence to support

32

Doggerel

Doggerel (n)

Poor verse

33

Dogmatic

Dogmatic (adj)

Stating options without proof


Dogma is the noun

Religious dogma specifies a time of the birth of creation.

34

Dormant

Dormant (adj)

Inactive

Dormant volcanoes.

35

Dross

Dross (n)

Waste; worthless matter; trivial matter

One of the ways the dross among blogs on the internet are filtered out from the worthwhile ones is through links good blogs provide to other good blogs.

36

Dupe

Dupe (v) to deceive; trick

In friendship, as well as in love, the mind is often duped by the heart.

37

Ebullient

Ebullient (adj)

Exhilarated; enthusiastic

The ebullient candidate for president appeared before his supporters to announce that he had won in a landslide.

38

Eclectic

Eclectic (adj)

Selecting from various sources

39

Effervescence

Effervescence (n)

State of high spirits or liveliness; the process of bulb ing as has escapes

Effervescence occurs when hydrochloride acid is added to a block of limestone.

40

Effete

Effete (adj)

Depleted of vitality; over refined; decadent

In 1960, the Vice President denounced people protesting against the Vietnam war, said this was encouraged by "an effete corps of impudent snobs who characterized themselves as intellectuals."

41

Efficacy

Efficacy (n)

Efficiency; effectiveness

Efficacious (adj)

42

Effrontery

Effrontery (n)

Shameless boldness; presumptuousness

In her essay the student had the effrontery to argue that school is largely a waste of time

43

Egoism

Egoism (n)

The tendency to see things in relation to oneself; self-centeredness

The beginning of philosophy has been described as a moving away from egoism to an understanding of the larger world.

44

Egotistical

Egotistical (adj)

Excessively self centered; conceited

The critics accused the writer of being egotistical since she wrote only about herself.

45

Elegy

Elegy (n)

Poem or song expressing lamentation (grief)

46

Elicit

Elicit (v) to provoke; draw out

The Socratic method is designed to elicit responses that guide the student toward understanding.

47

Elixir

Elixir (n)

A substance believed to have the power to cute all ills

48

Elysian

Elysian (adj)

Blissful; delightful

49

Emaciated

Emaciated (adj)

Thin and wasted

The prisoner was Emaciated.

50

Embellish

Embellish (v)

To adorn; decorate; enhance; make more attractive by adding details.

The story he wrote was so powerful there was no need to embellish it.

51

Emollient

Emollient (adj)

Soothing; mollifying

The politician's speech is filled with emollient phrases to make his message more palatable.

Emollient is also a noun that means an agent that soothes it makes acceptable .

52

Empirical

Empirical (adj)

Derived from observation or experiment

Empiricism is a noun meaning the view that experience is the only source of knowledge.

53

Emulate

Emulate (v)

To imitate; copy

Bionics uses technology to emulate nature, but sometimes a similar process occurs in reverse, in which scientists use technology as a heuristic tool to better understand natural processes.

54

Heuristic

Heuristic (adj)

serving to indicate or point out; stimulating interest as a means of furthering investigation.

encouraging a person to learn, discover, understand, or solve problems on his or her own, as by experimenting, evaluating possible answers or solutions, or by trial and error: a heuristic teaching method.

of, relating to, or based on experimentation, evaluation, or trial-and-error methods.

55

Encomium

Encomium (n)

A formal expression of praise

The prime minister asked her speechwriter to compose an encomienda for the retiring general.

56

Endemic

Endemic (adj)

Inherent; belonging to an area

Malaria, once endemic to the area, has now been largely eradicated.

57

Enervate

Enervate (v)

To weaken

During World War 2 Russian commanders counted on the bitter cold to enervate German soldiers invading their country.

58

Engender

Engender (v)

To cause; produce

Freudians believe that the traumatic events of infancy often engender repression that creates neuroses

59

Enhance

Enhance (v)

To increase; improve

60

Entomology

Entomology (n)

The scientific study of insects

61

Enunciate

Enunciate (v)

To pronounce clearly

62

Ephemeral

Ephemeral (adj)

Short-lived; fleeting

Kurt Cobain was an ephemeral phenomena.

63

Epistemology

Epistemology (n)

Branch of philosophy that examines the nature of knowledge

64

Equable

Equable (adj)

Steady; unvarying; serene

Throughout the crisis the president remained equable

65

Equitably

Equitably

Fair, just it impartial

66

Equaniminity

Equanimity (n)

Composure; calmness

Emergency room doctors and nurses are trained to maintain their equanimity when treating patients.

67

Equivocate

Equivocate (v)

To intentionally use vague language

The businessperson has earned a reputation as someone who never equivocates and can be trusted to do exactly what he promises.

The noun is equivocation

68

Errant

Errant (adj)

Mistaken; straying from the proper course

The pitchers errant fastball struck the batter on the shoulder.

69

Erudite

Erudite (adj)

Learned; scholarly

He is one of the most erudite people I have ever met.

Erudition (noun)

70

Esoteric

Esoteric (adj)

Hard to understand; known only to a few

He has a plethora of esoteric statistics that really helped this company.

71

Essay

Essay (v)

To make an attempt; subject to a test

The composer began to work on a sonata, a form she had not previously essayed.

72

Estimable

Estimable (adj)

Admirable; possible to estimate

Estimable figures