Exam 3 inflammatory blistering diseases Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Exam 3 inflammatory blistering diseases Deck (34):
1

What are the hallmarks of HSV-1?

Above neck, mouth lesions, less recurrence than HSV-2

2

What are the hallmarks of HSV-2

genitalia STD, recurrent

3

What are the hallmarks of vericella (chicken pox)?

dew drops of a rose petal (chicken pox)

4

What are the hallmarks of herpes zoster?

Unilateral dermatome has many lesions

5

What are the hallmarks of impetigo?

honey-colored crusting

6

What are the hallmarks of bullous pemphigoid?

Tense blisters (don't move much)

7

What is the disease associated with dermatitis herpetiformus?

celiac's disease, gets worse with gluten

8

What is the hallmark of pemphigus vulgaris

flaccid blisters

9

What is the hallmark of porphyria cutanea tarda

hyperpigmentation

10

What do infections of HSV-1 and HSV-2 occur?

HSV-1 is in childhood, HSV2 is STD of adults

11

What is a specific treatment of HSV1

acycolvir (oral), famciclovir, valacyclovir, contagion prevention

12

How long does the varicella virus take to incubate?

14 days

13

What are the prodromes of varicella?

fever, chills, malaise, 2-3 days before onset of rash

14

What are major complications of varicella?

encephalitis, pneumonia, hepatitis, Reye's syndrome, can become septic with secondary infections

15

What is the immunization schedule for varicella?

2 doses: 1st at 12-15 months then 2nd at 4-6 years. People over 13 years should get 2 doses 28 days apart

16

What is the prodrome of herpes zoster?

pain along nerve root up to 5 days prior to rash

17

What else should you rule out with herpes zoster?

Immunosuppression (cancer, HIV, connective tissue disease

18

What are the current treatments of herpes zoster?

acyclovir (PO, IV), prednisone

19

What should you worry about with a herpes zoster outbreak on the face?

Infection of the eye leading to blindness

20

How quickly should you treat herpes zoster to reduce post-herpetic neuralgia?

Treat within 48 hours

21

What causes non-bullous impetigo?

Group A strep pyogenese (catalase-, Beta hemolytic) staph aureus (catalase+, coagulase+), mixed infection

22

What causes bullous impetigo?

group II staph aureus (contains epidermolytic toxin)

23

What's more common, bullous or non-bullous impetigo?

non-bullous

24

What is non-bullous impetigo?

single red macule or papule that becomes vesicle that erups and forms an erosion that dries to make honey-colored crust

25

What is bullous impetigo?

Superficial vesicles that progress rapidly to flaccid bullae with sharp margins and no surrounding erythema, eruption leads to yellow crust with oozing

26

Should you pop impetigo pustules?

NO

27

Treatment of bullous impetigo?

Hygienic measures, topical antibiotics, oral antibiotics

28

Name the different bullous diseases (all autoimmune)

Bullous pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, dermatitis herpetiformis

29

Describe bullous pemphigoid. treatment?

Tensile bullae on normal or erythematous skin; prednisone, topical cortisone

30

Describe dermatitis herpetiformis. What disease is it associated with?

autoimmune condition with clusters of erythematous papules, pruritic and distributed symmetrically along extensor surfaces; Associated with Celiac's

31

Describe pemphigus vulgaris

flaccid blisters on head, trunk and intertriginous areas, Nikoslky sign

32

What condition results in porphyria cutanea tarda?

deficiency in heme-synthesizing enzyme

33

Describe porphyria cutanea tarda?

blistering of skin in sun-exposed areas, hyperpigmentation

34

What are risk factors for porphyria cutanea tarda?

hepatitis C, hemochromatosis and alcoholism