explanations and treatments BEHAVIOURAL Flashcards Preview

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1

what do the advocates of this approach believe about abnormal behaviour?

that it is learned

2

is classical conditioning how mental illness is maintained or developed?

developed?

3

is operant conditioning how mental illness is maintained or developed?

maintained

4

is social learning theory how mental illness is maintained or developed?

developed

5

explain classical conditioning

a neutral stimulus is paired with an unconditioned stimulus. The neutral stimulus is now a conditioned stimulus producing a conditioned response.

6

give an example of classical conditioning with phobias

"Little Albert" when he reached out for his rabbit, a steel bar was banged so startle him. A week later, they showed him the rabbit and he began to cry.

7

Classical conditioning is learning through _______?

association

8

explain operant conditioning

reinforced responses means the actions will be repeated. If a response is punished, this decreases the chance it will be repeated. Maladaptive behaviour will be rewarded which could create a psychological disorder. This means such behaviour are functional for the individual.

9

give an example of operant conditioning for a child that has panic attacks

a child finds that get more attention when they have a panic attack. These could become more frequent and become difficult to stop.

10

explain social learning theory

behaviours are learned by seeing others being rewarded or punished.

11

One strength of this is it overcomes the ethical issues of labelling, explain this strength

It focuses on the behaviour so states that it is nobody's` fault which means the patient will not feel ashamed or disheartened as they know it is not their fault. It focuses on maladaptive behaviour.

12

Another strength of this theory is that it focuses on functioning, explain this strength

The person is more likely to seek treatment as they can "unlearn it"

13

Cultural differences is also a strength, explain

it focuses on individual culture of one person as it allows culture to be taken into account.

14

One weakness is that advocates claim the model does not look at the cause just the symptoms of the abnormality

The treatment is effective but only for a short period of time because they don't find the root of the problem. It manifests in a different illness e.g. a phobia

15

Another is that it is reductionist explain

Too simplistic as its a limited view. All mental illness are learnt, doesn't take into account biological/cognitive factors?! Applies mainly to phobias only

16

TREATMENTS
what are the 2 treatments called?

systematic desensitisation
aversion therapy

17

TREATMENTS
what is the aim of SD?

use reverse conditioning to replace a maladaptive response.

18

TREATMENTS
what is the procedure in SD?

1-teach the individual how to relax
2- hierarchy of anxiety-provoking situations, they increase each time.
3-In Vivo or in Vitro- actually do it
4-reciprocal inhibition- anxiety and relaxation cant work together.
5-treatment compete when the client is desensitised

19

TREATMENTS
what does in vivo mean?

real- the object is actually moving closer

20

TREATMENTS
what does in vitro mean?

imagined- the object is being imagined getting closer

21

TREATMENTS EVALUATION
what is a strength of SD?

there is research support, there is an ability to tolerate of imagine stressful situations so can get better-vivo is much more successful.

22

TREATMENTS EVALUATION
what is a weakness of SD?

it doesn't find the cause of the problem so will likely manifest in another illness
Its short term also

23

TREATMENTS EVALUATION
is SD unethical?

it can be said to be in in vivo. The client may not get cured but can be very traumatized.

24

TREATMENTS EVALUATION
is SD unethical?

it can be said to be in in vivo. The client may not get cured but can be very traumatized.

25

TREATMENTS
what is the aim of aversion therapy

to rid a person of an undesirable habit by pairing with an undesirable consequence.

26

TREATMENTS
what is an example of aversion therapy using nail biting

use a special nail varnish which tastes disgusting to stop those biting their nails

27

TREATMENTS EVALUATION AT
is it ethical?

the therapists cant predict whether there will be any reactions or side effects

28

TREATMENTS EVALUATION AT
normally combined therapies are at work when aversion therapy is being used, explain

it gives a window of opportunity so the client can experience both methods

29

TREATMENTS
there is another treatment called behaviour modification, what is its aim/.

to reinforce positive behaviour

30

TREATMENTS EVALUATION
the behaviour modification is used in prisons for example with tokens, outline this

tokens are given for good behaviour but as soon as leaving the prison, bad habits return