Failure of Restorations Flashcards Preview

BDS 2: Adult Restorative > Failure of Restorations > Flashcards

Flashcards in Failure of Restorations Deck (20)
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1

What type of amalgams tend to have the best longevity?

High Copper alloys tend to last longer

2

In composite with dentine bonding when does failure in cervical cavities typically begin?

10-12 months

3

How is the longevity of composite with dentine bonding normally improved?

Improved survival with acidic primer

4

When is a restoration considered failed? (5)

- Secondary disease occurs
- Loss of function of tooth
- “Inevitable” progression to caries
- Microleakage causing sensitivity or pain
- Appearance unacceptable to patient

5

What could be a potential symptom of secondary disease in a failed restoration? (2)

- Discolouration
- Symptoms of pulpits

6

How could you detect secondary disease signs at restoration margins? (3)

- Visually
- Radiography
- Tactile (scrape around tooth)

7

How could you detect secondary disease signs in deep tissue? (2)

- Visually
- Radiography

8

What are some signs of loss of function of a tooth after a failed restoration? (2)

- Restoration can be loose or lost
- Fractured tooth/cusp causing loss of occluding surface

9

What are some signs of inevitable progress of caries in a failed restoration? (2)

(Permitting microleakage)

- Fractured restoration permitting microleakage
- Loss of marginal integrity permitting microleakage

10

List some ways patients may be unhappy with the appearance of a restoration (5)

- Marginal staining
- Discolouration of anterior material
- Contrast with “normal” darkening of tooth
- Gingival recession (darker roots)
- Desire for white fillings

11

Why do restorations fail? (4)

- Patient factors
- Operator factors (iatrogenic)
- Materials factors
- Chance e.g. trauma

12

Name some patient factors leading to a failed restoration (5)

- Diet
- Plaque
- Saliva
- Poor oral hygiene
- Para-functional habits

13

How can we minimise the patient factors in a failed restoration?

When you are giving diet and hygiene advice, customise your advice to your patient lifestyle

14

What are some examples of errors in planning leading to a failed restoration? (5)

(Operator factors)

- Failure to promote prevention
- Failure to check occlusion before management of tooth
- Failure to take account of whole patient
- Inappropriate restoration for tooth or situation
- Inappropriate restorative material

15

What are some examples of errors in execution leading to a failed restoration? (8)

(Operator factors)

- Damage to pulp-dentine complex
- Leaving infected carious tissue
- Unsatisfactory cavity design for restorative material
- Failure to cover vital dentine surfaces causing hypersensitive dentine
- Failure to reduce height of tall thin cusps in occlusion
- Failure to use matrix properly causing over/under contoured restorations
- Incorrect use of material
- Using composite resin when the pulpal margin is in dentine

16

Name some ways where you can damage the pulp-dentine complex (3)

- Overcutting / pulp exposure
- Excessive heat
- Excessive pressure

17

As an operator what advice should we tell the patient to avoid error of execution? (2)

- Review maintenance of oral hygiene
- Give self-care instructions

18

Flawed data suggests what about repair or replacing failed restoration? (2)

- Repairs have similar short term survival to
replacement
- Repairs are less invasive

19

When deciding to repair or replace a failed restoration what should you explain to the patient? (3)

- Explain treatment options and associated risks
- Discuss current state of evidence base underpinning treatment options
- Combine clinical expertise with patient’s informed choice

20

What structures made with a rose-head bur will improve auxiliary retention of a restoration? (3)

- Vertical grooves
- Angled Coves
- Horizontal slots