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Flashcards in Hazmat 4 Carbon Monoxide Deck (16)
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1

What are the properties of CO?

2.1 CO is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, non-irritating, toxic gas.

2

Is CO a flammable gas?

2.4 It is a flammable gas with an auto ignition temperature of 1128 Degrees F., and a Lower
Explosive Level (LEL) of 12.5% and an Upper Explosive Level (UEL) of 74%.

3

Is CO lighter or heavier than air (vapor density)?

2.5 CO has a vapor density which makes it slightly lighter than air (.968). Since warm air rises, CO rises with it. E.g. air from a furnace, hot water heater, or a fire. Once this emitted air cools to room temperature, CO will disperse evenly through the room.

4

Once in the body CO combines with hemoglobin and becomes a deadly compound called
carboxyhemoglobin (COHb). How many more times is CO attracted to the hemoglobin than O2?

3.9 CO has a greater affinity for hemoglobin than O2 . CO is about 210 more attracted to hemoglobin than O2.

5

How many parts of oxygen are needed to replace 1 part of CO to reverse the buildup in the body?

3.11 To reverse the buildup of COHb in the body, over 200 parts of oxygen are required to replace one part of CO.

6

What are the symptoms of CO poisoning?
Low levels?
Medium levels?
High Levels?

3.12 Symptoms of CO Poisoning:
a. Low Level CO Poisoning- can mimic flu symptoms, headache (mild/severe), fatigue, nausea, dizziness, confusion, irritability.
b. Medium Level CO Poisoning- vomiting, drowsiness, loss of consciousness.
c. High Level CO Poisoning- seizure, coma, permanent brain damage, death.

7

OSHA's Maximum safe working level over how many hours?

3.15 The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has established a maximum safe
working level for CO at 35 parts per million (p.p.m.) over an eight (8) hour period in the general work place.

8

EPA's residential levels over how many hours?

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established that residential levels are not to exceed 9 p.p.m. over an 8 hour average.

9

What do we do when any individual is exhibiting symptoms of CO poisoning?

4.1.1 Are any individuals exhibiting symptoms of CO poisoning? If so immediately evacuate the affected area, ventilate, and request E.M.S. to respond.
4.1.2 Request the response of a company equipped with a CO meter if one is not already
on the scene.
Acronym: EVER

10

At how many PPM do we evacuate a building?

4.1.4 If no one exhibits any symptoms of CO poisoning, evacuation is not necessary,
unless a level of over 9 PPM is recorded by the meter.

11

The 4 reasons the IC shall request the utility company to respond?

4.1.5 The Incident Commander (IC) shall request the utility company to respond if:
a. A CO level over 9 PPM is recorded by a meter.
b. Units on the scene shut off a gas appliance.
c. An individual(s) is exhibiting symptoms of CO poisoning.
d. The IC feels a response by the utility company is required.

12

Search of a premise is to be conducted by who?

4.2.6 Search of the premises is to be conducted by a radio equipped team of a least two firefighters.

13

What is a CO incident?
And what are our SOP's?

4.3 CO Incidents: Meter readings of 9 PPM or less:
4.3.1 Inform occupant that our meter has not detected an elevated CO level.
4.3.2 Attempt to reset detector, if detector does not reset or it does not have a reset , recommend that the occupant refer to the manufacturer’s instructions
4.3.3 Inform occupants that if detector activates again that they should again call 911 to notify the Fire Department.
Note: The condition may have been caused by reverse stacking or a downdraft. Leaving a window open could eliminate the problem.

14

What do we do at CO emergency that is greater than 9 PPM but less than 100 PPM?

4.4 CO Emergency: Meter readings of greater than 9 PPM but less than 100 PPM:
4.4.1 Readings of greater than 9 PPM shall not be considered normal.
4.4.2 Inform occupants that they have a potentially dangerous level of CO.
4.4.3 Recommend that all persons leave the affected area and begin ventilation.
4.4.4 If it is determined that an appliance is malfunctioning and thereby producing CO, it should be shut down.
4.4.5 Once the faulty appliance is shut down and ventilation has reduced the CO level to 9 PPM or less the premises may be reoccupied.
4.4.6 Attempt to reset the detector as in sec 4.3.2
4.4.7 Inform the occupant of all actions taken and that the utility company has been requested to respond.
4.4.8 Inform the occupant that if the detector activates again they should again notify the Fire Department by calling 911.

15

What are our SOP's when CO levels are greater than 100 PPM?

4.5 CO Emergency: Meter Readings of 100 PPM and Greater:
4.5.1 Inform occupants that we have detected a potentially lethal level of CO.
4.5.2 Begin evacuation of the affected area and ventilate.
4.5.3 If a malfunction appliance is found producing CO it should be shut down.
4.5.4 Once the source of CO has been mitigated and the level of CO reduced to 9 PPM or less the area may be reoccupied.
4.5.5 Attempt to reset the detector as in sec 4.3.2.
4.5.6 Inform occupants of the actions taken, and that the utility company has been requested to respond.
4.5.7 Inform occupants that if the detector activates again they should again notify the Fire Department by calling 911.

16

What is the radio code for a CO Response?
What are the subcodes?

10-38 Carbon Monoxide Response
Any type of Carbon Monoxide Response
Code 1: Detector Activation: Carbon Monoxide Investigation (low battery, defective detector, unwarranted alarm, etc.)
Code 2: Detector Activation: Carbon Monoxide Incident (CO Meter Reading of 1-9ppm).
Code 3: Detector Activation: Carbon Monoxide Emergency ( CO Meter Reading of greater than 9ppm).
Code 4: No Detector Activation: Carbon Monoxide Incident or Emergency (Specify) e.g.: No detector present in affected area, detector present in affected area, but did not activate.