Locomotor: PBL 3 (Compartment Syndrome) Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Locomotor: PBL 3 (Compartment Syndrome) Deck (43)
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1

Describe the contents of the anterior compartment of the leg

Anterior tibial artery, common peroneal (fibular) nerve (gives off branches of superficial and deep peroneal nerves)

2

Describe the contents of the lateral compartment of the leg

Fibular artery, common peroneal nerve (superficial and deep peroneal nerves)

3

Describe the contents of the posterior compartment of the leg

Posterior tibial artery and tibial nerve

4

What are the branches of the common peroneal nerve?

Superficial and deep

5

What is the motor role of the deep peroneal nerve?

Supplies tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus and extensor hallucis longus involved in dorsiflexion and toe extension

6

What is the motor role of the superficial peroneal nerve?

Supplies fibularis longus and brevis (eversion of the foot)

7

What muscles does the tibial nerve supply?

Flexor digitorum longus, flexor hallucis longus and tibialis posterior (plantarflexion)

8

Describe the branches of the tibial nerve

Sural nerve given off (sensory to calf), in the foot branches into medial and lateral plantar branches:

9

What are the branches of the sciatic nerve?

Common peroneal and tibial

10

What is the sensory role of the superficial peroneal nerve?

Skin of anterior and lateral leg and dorsum of foot (mainly)

11

What is the sensory role of the deep peroneal nerve?

1st interweb space of the toes

12

What is the sensory role of the tibial nerve

Lateral plantar nerve - sensory to lateral 1 1/2 toes on plantar surface
Medial plantar nerve - sensory to medial 3 1/2 toes on plantar surface

13

Which muscles are involved in dorsiflexion (with toe extension)?

Tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum longus and extensor hallucis longus

14

Which muscles are involved in eversion?

Fibularis longus and brevis

15

Which muscles are involved in plantarflexion?

Superficial (attach to calcaneal tendon): gastrocnemius, soleus and plantaris
Deep (attach to foot bones): tibialis posterior, flexor digitorum longus and flexor hallucis longus

16

Describe the superficial veins of the lower limb

Great saphenous vein (starts medial anterior and drains into femoral vein)
Small saphenous vein (drains the posterior calf into the popliteal vein)

17

Describe the path of deep veins in the lower limb

Femoral vein --> lateral circumflex femoral and profunda (lateral bundle) AND continuation of femoral medially --> popliteal vein (as femoral enters fossa) --> posterior tibial, anterior tibial and peroneal/fibular veins

18

Describe the passage and divisions of arteries in the lower limb

Femoral artery --> medial circumflex and profunda.
Profunda femoris --> popliteal as it enters fossa
Popliteal artery --> common tibial --> anterior and posterior tibial arteries
Popliteal artery --> fibular artery also

19

What are the types of compartment syndrome?

Acute and chronic

20

Describe acute compartment syndrome

Occurs after traumatic injury which causes severely high pressure in a compartment leading to insufficient blood supply (ischaemia) and requires emergency surgery otherwise there will be resultant permanent nerve and muscle damage

21

Describe chronic compartment syndrome

Exercise-induced variety whereby pressure in the muscle increases to extremes during exercise causing a decrease in blood flow to the affected area --> ischaemia

22

Describe the symptoms of compartment syndrome

Extreme tightness in affected muscles, painful burning sensation if exercise is continued, foot drop

23

Explain the cause of compartment syndrome

Due to excessive pressure on or within the muscle compartments; if there is any swelling of tissue due to injury or exercise, this can cause the compression of venules and lymphatic vessels, preventing them from draining. Therefore, while arterial inflow is increased, outflow is diminished and this causes further pressure build-up within the compartment eventually leading to the compression of arteries in the area --> ischaemia

24

How may compartment syndrome be treated?

Conservative treatments (chronic) - rest, anti inflammatory drugs, manual decompression (rest affected limb in line of heart)
Surgical (acute) - fasciotomy whereby incisions are made in the affected compartment to allow decompression and relieve pressure on lymphatics and venules to allow increased blood flow through the muscle

25

What complications can arise with compartment syndrome?

Failure to relieve pressure can result in myonecrosis (muscle death) which can have long-lasting effects, especially if there is associated nerve damage, it could even lead to paralysis of the region

26

Why could compartment syndrome cause severe ankle weakness?

Due to loss of nerve supply to the muscles of the ankle

27

Why could compartment syndrome cause bilateral foot drop?

Damage to the deep peroneal nerve as it's involved in producing dorsiflexion, so without there is unopposed plantarflexion (OR relaxed response)

28

Why could compartment syndrome cause oedema?

Due to compression preventing the drainage of lymph and venous blood

29

Why could compartment syndrome cause loss of an Achilles reflex?

Because nervous stimulation to the Achille's tendon is impaired

30

Why could compartment syndrome cause elevated creatine kinase levels?

This molecule is formed in muscle death so is indicative of myonecrosis