Motor Control & Motor Learning (Exam 2) Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Motor Control & Motor Learning (Exam 2) Deck (37):
1

The ability to maintain and change posture and movement, is the result of a complex set of neurologic and mechanical processes.

Motor Control

2

Study of nature and cause of movement.

Motor Control

3

Performed with context of an environment. How do people walk?

Action

4

Essential to action and vice versa.

Perception

5

Attention, motivation, and emotional aspects that underlie the establishment of intent or goals.

Cognition

6

Need all 3 for the nature of MC.

Action, Perception, Cognition

7

Highest level of control.

Cortex

8

Basic unit of movement in the motor control model.

Reflexes

9

Equilibrium reactions

Cortex

10

Righting reactions

Midbrain

11

Postural tonic reflexes

Brainstem

12

Phasic primitive reflexes

Spinal Cord

13

Simplest reflexes, occur at the spinal cord level. Occur early in the life span of an infant.

Primitive Reflexes

14

Associated with the brain stem of the CNS. Produce changes in muscle tone and posture. Most of these reflexes are integrated by 4-6 months.

Tonic Reflexes

15

Complex postural responses that continue to be present in adulthood. Involve head and trunk; provide body with automatic way to respond to movement within and outside body's BOS.

Righting and Equilibrium Reactions

16

Random movements. Example: Random movements.

Mobility

17

Maintenance of a posture. Example: Quadruped.

Stability

18

Movement with a posture. Example: Sit to stand.

Controlled Mobility

19

Movement from one posture to another. Example: Creeping or Walking

Skill

20

During the action, making changes right then.

Closed Loop

21

After the error is detected.

Open Loop

22

Learning new skill or relearning old skill as a whole activity.

Stage I: Cognition/Acquisition

23

Allowing patient to practice and self-correct is also important during this stage. Giving time to self-correct before offering feedback is important to learning.

Stage 1: Cognition/Acquisition

24

Patients can run the program with in specific environmental constraints. Decrease in error during activity. Less effort required for performance. Example: One surface

Stage 2: Associative/Refinement

25

Patient moves to a variety of different environments and retains control of the whole program. Example: Any surface.

Stage 3: Autonomous Stage/Retention

26

Changing overtime.

Open skills.

27

Constant.

Closed skills.

28

Which skill is harder open or closed?

Open skills.

29

Based upon sensory responses inherent to the patient's body as part of the desired movement.

Intrinsic Feedback

30

Based upon outside source of providing feedback. Independence is not learned until patient can self-correct using intrinsic feedback.

Extrinsic Feedback

31

Uses sensory system such as therapist's voice.

KP or Knowledge of Performance

32

Informs a patient as to whether task is accomplished or how close the movement comes to accomplishing task.

KR or Knowledge of Results

33

Immediate behavioral performance, will learn to rely on external feedback.

Constant Feedback

34

3 Schedules of External Feedback

Summed, Faded, Bandwidth

35

Feedback after a set number of trials.

Summed Feedback

36

Initially feedback after every trial, then decreasing to every other trial, every third, every fourth, etc.

Faded Feedback

37

Feedback only when performance is beyond a given range of error.

Bandwidth Feedback