Music EC-12 CD=4.Standard Music Notation Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Music EC-12 CD=4.Standard Music Notation Deck (20)
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1

Identify the relative major key of b minor.

A. G Major
B. B Major
C. D Major
D. D# Major

Answer C is correct.

D major is the relative major of b minor. Relative major and minor keys share the same key signature. They are "related" by having the same key signature. The relative major tonic note (D) is a minor third above the minor tonic note (B).

2

Identify the parallel major key of c# minor.

A. E Major
B. C# Major
C. A Major
D. A# Major

Answer B is correct.

C# Major is the parallel major of c# minor. Parallel major and minor keys have the same tonic (C#), but have different key signatures. Parallel major and minor keys are "parallel" in that they share the same tonic note.

3

Identify the relative minor key of F# Major.

A. D minor
B. A minor
C. F# minor
D. D# minor

Answer D is correct.

D# minor is the relative minor of F# major. Relative major and minor keys share the same key signature. They are "related" by having the same key signature. The relative major tonic note (F#) is a minor third above the minor tonic note (D#). The correct answer is D.

4

Which of the following intervals is also referred to as a "tritone"?

A. The interval of a diminished 4th
B. The interval of an augmented 5th
C. The interval of a diminished 5th
D. The interval of a perfect 4th

Answer C is correct.

The correct response is the interval of a diminished 5th. “Tritone” is a term which labels the interval of an augmented 4th and a diminished 5th, which are actually the same pitch, but are notated differently as either a "raised" fourth rather or a "lowered" 5th. A tritone is a half- step more than a perfect 4th and a half-step less than a diminished 5th. It is formed by the lowest and highest note of a diminished triad. The tritone is sometimes referred to as the "devil's interval."

5

Imperfect authentic cadence

An Imperfect authentic cadence concludes with a V-I progression, which defines an authentic cadence.
The final note in the top (soprano) line is not the tonic note, making the cadence "imperfect." The tonic note in the top line on the final "I" chord in a plagal (IV-I) or authentic (V-I) cadence determines a "perfect" quality.

6

Imperfect plagal cadence

An imperfect plagal cadence is a IV-I progression with the final note in the top (soprano) line is not being the tonic note, which makes the cadence "imperfect."
The tonic note in the top line on the final "I" chord in a plagal (IV-I) or authentic (V-I) cadence determines a "perfect" quality.

7

Perfect plagal cadence

A perfect plagal cadence concludes with a IV-I progression, which defines a plagal cadence.
The final note in the top (soprano) line is the tonic note, making the cadence "perfect." The tonic note in the top line on the final "I" chord in a plagal (IV-I) or authentic (V-I) cadence determines a "perfect" quality.

8

Half cadence

A half cadence is defined as a chord progression that concludes with I-V. While it provides some sense of rest or arrival, the feeling of finality is much stronger in plagal and authentic cadences.

9

Perfect authentic cadence

A perfect authentic concludes with a V-I progression, which defines an authentic cadence.
The final note in the top (soprano) line is the tonic note, making the cadence "perfect." The tonic note in the top line on the final "I" chord in a plagal (IV-I) or authentic (V-I) cadence determines a "perfect" quality.

10

Deceptive cadence

A deceptive cadence is identified as a chord progression that concludes with V-vi (Dominant to sub-mediant).
It is referred to as a deceptive cadence because it "deceives" the listener that is expecting an V-I (authentic) cadence. Like the half cadence, it provides some sense of rest or arrival, but the feeling of finality is much stronger in plagal and authentic cadences.

11

Major Scale

A major scale is comprised of ascending (and descending) notes in the following whole (w) step and half (h) step sequence w-w-h-w-w-w-h. Playing the white keys from c to c on the keyboard is often used to aurally and visually illustrate the major scale. The notes of a major scale are the same ascending and descending.

12

Natural minor scale

A natural minor scale is characterized by a lowered third and sixth scale degrees when compared to a major scale. A natural minor scale is comprised of ascending (and descending) notes in the following whole (w) step and half (h) step sequence w-h-w-w-h-w-w. Unlike the harmonic and melodic minor scales, there are no alterations (raised or lowered scale degrees). Playing the white keys from a to a on the keyboard is often used to aurally and visually illustrate the natural minor scale.

13

Harmonic minor scale

A harmonic minor scale is a natural minor scale with a raised seventh scale degree, both ascending and descending. The raised seventh scale degree facilitates the function of the 7 to 1 "leading tone" that appears without alteration in major scales and keys. A harmonic minor scale can be easily visualized and heard by playing a to a on the white keys on the piano, but playing g# rather than g ascending and descending.

14

Melodic minor scale

A melodic minor scale is a natural minor scale with raised ascending sixth and seventh scale degrees that are "naturalized" on the descending half of the scale. As suggested by the label, this scale is often employed in the composition of melodies in minor keys. A melodic minor scale can be easily visualized and heard by playing a to a on the white keys on the piano, but raising the f and g to f# and g# while ascending, but playing g natural and f natural while descending.

15

3 variations of the minor scales

Natural minor
Harmonic minor
Melodic minor

16

Texture

Texture is a general term that relates to the "sound aspects" of music, and is described in many terms, among them are thick or thin, homophonic, polyphonic, canonic, or fugal. Thick and thin texture can be determined by varying the number of parts, doublings, and instrumentation. Homophony and polyphony are sometimes categorized as "harmonic textures" that can be identified by the vertical similarity or contrast of rhythm among parts, while a more horizontal view can reveal the presence of canonic or fugal passages.

17

Polyphonic

Polyphonic describes music that has multiple parts or voices moving at different times. A fugue is typically polyphonic.

18

Monophonic

Monophonic describes music that is unison ("one sound"). Music of Ancient Greece and of the early church (e.g. plainsong, plainchant, Gregorian chant) are examples of monophony.

19

Homophonic

Homophonic ("same sound") compositions are defined by the accompanying voices/instruments having the same rhythm. Homorhythmic ("same rhythm") is a more precise term that describes all parts having the same rhythm. Both terms can be used to define typical hymns, as they are typically are scored for four voices (SATB) and the voices generally have the same rhythm at the same time.

20

Strophic

Strophic describes music that is comprised of music sections that are repeated. Folk songs with multiple "verses" are an example of a strophic composition.