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Flashcards in Parts of speech Deck (29)
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1

what are open word classes?

word classes that allow new words into them such as adjectives, nouns, main verbs, adverbs

2

What are closed word classes?

Word classes that do not allow or rarely allow new words into their classes, such as pronouns, determiners, auxiliary verbs, conjuntions, prepostions

3

What are homonyms?

words that share the same form but are not related in meaning: ex: Peer vs. peer.

4

What are homonyms?

Words that share the same sound but differ in spelling:
ex: weigh and weigh

5

What are homographs?

words that share the same spelling but differ in pronounciation: ex: row (line of object ) and row= quarrel

6

what are lexical words?

Words listed as main words in dictionaries

7

What are suffixes ?

Endings added to words to form new words:

8

what are noun suffixes?

noun endings such as -tion, er, or, ism , ity, ment, ness

9

What are the noun classes?

We have two sets: proper and common nouns

10

What are proper nouns?

Nouns that names people, places, occasions that begin with a captial letter: Lucy, New york, Christmas

11

What are common nouns?

Nouns that are not names such as the capital of Sweden is Stockholm.

12

What are two subclasses of common nouns?

Concrete and abstract nouns
count-nouns and non-count nouns

13

What are concrete and abstract nouns?

Concrete nouns refer to people, places, or things: girl, kitchen, car
abstract nouns refer to qualities, states or actions; humour, belif, honesty

14

what are count nouns?

Nouns that can be counted, they can have both singular and plural form: a, one, every, -ten, many, those - students.

15

what are non-count nouns?

Those that cannot be counted: information, furniture, software. They are treated as singular .
much, your, that- information

16

Are abstract nouns usally count-nouns?

No, they are usually non-count nouns

17

Can determiners such as THE and YOUR go with both non-count and count nouns?

Yes

18

what does A and THOSE go with?

singular count nouns or only with plural count nouns

19

How can non-count nouns be converted into count nouns?

When the count nouns refer to diffrent kinds of varieties
"The shop has a selection of cheeses"
or the count noun refers to units that are obvious in the situation:
"I will have two coffies please"

20

when do we use few/little and fewer/less?

Few/ fewer are used with count nouns
little/less are used with non-count nouns

21

How does count nouns make a distinction between singular and plural?

The regular plurals ends in inflectional -s

22

Name some irregular plurals of woman, man, foot, goose, tooth, mouse, louse, brother, child, ox, stimulus, curriculum, crisis, phenomenon

women, men, feet, geese, teeth, mice, lice, brethren, children, oxen, stimuli, curricula, crises, phenomena.

23

Name some nouns that mark gender in english: (the equivalent of these genders)
father-
widow-
bride
boy,
host, hero,
bull,
lion

father, mother, widower, widow, bridegroom , bride, boy, girl, host, hostess, hero, heroine, bull, vow, lion, lioness

24

How many cases does nouns have?

Two
common and genitive case

25

what are common case?

The most often used
Singular: the student plural: the students

26

What are genitive case?

Genitive case generally indicates that the noun is dependent on the noun that follows it, this case often corresponds to the structrue "of"

27

How is case marked in writing for regular nouns?

By an apostrophe plus s in singular "student's "
and by apostrophe following the plural -s
"students'"

28

What do we use the genitive S for?

to express possession," my mother's car" refer to a period of time, "an hour's stay" or a type of something. " a womans college"

29

What are dependent and independent genitives?

The dependent genitive is dependent on a following noun. "The student's essay"
The independent genitive is not dependent on a following noun. " Sally's comments are better than Alan's"
The independent genitive may combine with the of-structure.
"One of my friends"