TBL7 - Femoral Triangle Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in TBL7 - Femoral Triangle Deck (9):
1

What forms the superior boundary of the femoral triangle? What forms the lateral boundary of the femoral triangle? What forms the medial boundary of the femoral triangle?

1) The superior boundary of the femoral triangle is formed by the inguinal ligament that extends between the ASIS and body of the pubis
2) The lateral boundary of the triangle is formed by the sartorius muscle
3) The medial boundary of the triangle is formed by and adductor longus muscle

2

Where does the femoral nerve travel? Where does it originate from? What does it innervate? What is its terminal branch?

1) The femoral nerve leaves the abdominopelvic cavity and enters the lateral aspect of the femoral triangle
2) The femoral nerve originates from spinal cord segments L2-L4
3) The femoral nerve innervates the anterior thigh muscles
4) The saphenous nerve is the terminal cutaneous branch of the femoral nerve

3

What lesions might cause diminution or loss of the patellar tendon reflex?

1) The patellar tendon reflex tests the integrity of the femoral nerve and the L2–L4 spinal cord segments
2) Diminution or absence of the patellar tendon reflex may result from any lesion that interrupts the innervation of the quadriceps (e.g., peripheral nerve disease)

4

Where does the obturator nerve originate from? Where does it travel?

1) The obturator nerve originates from spinal cord segments L2-L4
2) It courses parallel to the femoral nerve on the posterior abdominal wall
3) It exits the abdominopelvic cavity via the obturator foramen to innervate the medial thigh muscles

5

Where does the deep fascia covering the iliopsoas muscle extend to? What is its function?

1) Deep fascia covering the iliopsoas muscle extends under the inguinal ligament as the femoral sheath that surrounds the femoral artery and vein in the femoral triangle
2) The sheath allows the vessels to glide under the inguinal ligament during movements of the hip joint

6

The femoral artery is a continuation of what? What does it supply? Where does the obturator artery travel?

1) The femoral artery is a continuation of the external iliac artery and supplies the anterior and anteromedial thigh
2) The obturator artery follows the course of the obturator nerve into the medial thigh

7

What does the deep artery of the thigh originate from? What originates from the deep artery? What are the distributions of the two arteries in the thigh?

1) The deep artery of the thigh originates from the femoral artery
2) The medial circumflex femoral artery typically arises from the deep artery
3) Deep artery of the thigh: Three to four perforating arteries pass through adductor magnus muscle, winding around femur to supply muscles in medial, posterior, and lateral part of anterior compartments
4) Medial circumflex femoral artery: Supplies most of blood to head and neck of femur; transverse branch takes part in cruciate anastomosis of thigh; ascending branch joins inferior gluteal artery

8

How does palpation of the femoral arterial pulse differ from palpation of an enlarged femoral hernia?

1) With the person lying in the supine position, the femoral pulse may be palpated midway between the ASIS and the pubic symphysis. By placing the tip of the little finger (of the right hand when dealing with the right side) on the ASIS and the tip of the thumb on the pubic tubercle, the femoral pulse can be palpated with the midpalm just inferior to the midpoint of the inguinal ligament by pressing firmly. Normally the pulse is strong; however, if the common or external iliac arteries are partially occluded, the pulse may be diminished
2) A femoral hernia appears as a mass, often tender, in the femoral triangle, inferolateral to the pubic tubercle

9

Why can aseptic vascular necrosis of the displaced femoral head occur after femoral neck fractures?

Following some femoral neck fractures, the artery to the ligament of the femoral head may be the only remaining source of blood to the proximal fragment. This artery is frequently inadequate for maintaining the femoral head; consequently, the fragment may undergo aseptic vascular necrosis (tissue death)

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