Unit 14a - Relative Pronouns Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Unit 14a - Relative Pronouns Deck (19):
0

Let’s start with the relative pronoun qui used as a subject. Qui may refer to people or things and may mean who, which, what, or that. The i of qui is never dropped before a vowel.

Je connais la personne qui parle.
I know the person who is speaking.

1

Let’s start with the relative pronoun qui used as a subject. Qui may refer to people or things and may mean who, which, what, or that. The i of qui is never dropped before a vowel.

Elle regarde le chat qui dort.
She is looking at the cat, who is sleeping.

2

Let’s start with the relative pronoun qui used as a subject. Qui may refer to people or things and may mean who, which, what, or that. The i of qui is never dropped before a vowel.

J’ignore qui il est.
I don’t know who he is.

3

The relative pronoun, which is often omitted in English, must be used in French.

Le film qui passe ce soir est un classique.
The film (that) they are showing tonight is a classic.

4

The relative pronoun, which is often omitted in English, must be used in French.

Voici des produits qui se vendent comme des petits pains.
Here are products that sell like hot cakes.

5

The verb following qui agrees in person and number with the noun that qui replaces.

C’est moi qui suis arrivée la première.
It’s me who arrived first.

6

The verb following qui agrees in person and number with the noun that qui replaces.

C’est vous qui avez raison.
It’s you who are right.

7

The verb following qui agrees in person and number with the noun that qui replaces.

C’est nous qui sommes en retard.
It’s us who are late.

8

When the clause introduced by a relative pronoun already has a subject, the relative pronoun is the object of the verb of the clause it introduces. In this case, the relative pronoun que (whom, which, that) is used. Like qui, que may refer to people or things. The e of que is dropped before a vowel.

C’est le journaliste que nous préférons.
It’s the journalist we prefer.

9

When the clause introduced by a relative pronoun already has a subject, the relative pronoun is the object of the verb of the clause it introduces. In this case, the relative pronoun que (whom, which, that) is used. Like qui, que may refer to people or things. The e of que is dropped before a vowel.

Il engagera l’interprète que nous recommandons toujours.
He’ll hire the interpreter we always recommend.

10

When the clause introduced by a relative pronoun already has a subject, the relative pronoun is the object of the verb of the clause it introduces. In this case, the relative pronoun que (whom, which, that) is used. Like qui, que may refer to people or things. The e of que is dropped before a vowel.

C’est une émission que tu dois écouter.
Here’s a program you must listen to.

11

When the clause introduced by a relative pronoun already has a subject, the relative pronoun is the object of the verb of the clause it introduces. In this case, the relative pronoun que (whom, which, that) is used. Like qui, que may refer to people or things. The e of que is dropped before a vowel.

Il aime l’oiseau que le marchand lui a vendu.
He likes the bird the merchant sold him.

12

In compound tenses, if the direct object relative pronoun is placed before the verb, the past participle agrees in gender and number with the noun that the pronoun replaces.

Les fleurs que vous avez achetées sont très belles.
The flowers you bought are very beautiful.

13

In compound tenses, if the direct object relative pronoun is placed before the verb, the past participle agrees in gender and number with the noun that the pronoun replaces.

Les photos qu’il a prises sont un peu floues.
The pictures he took are a bit blurred.

14

In compound tenses, if the direct object relative pronoun is placed before the verb, the past participle agrees in gender and number with the noun that the pronoun replaces.

La robe qu’elle a faite est en lin.
The dress she made is linen.

15

Often, the relative clause is inserted in the main clause. Note that qui and que may refer to either people or things.

La femme qui chante sur la scène, est aussi une célèbre pianiste.
The woman who is singing on stage is also a famous pianist.

16

Often, the relative clause is inserted in the main clause. Note that qui and que may refer to either people or things.

Le livre qui est sur la table, a été publié après la mort de l’écrivain. The book that is on the table was published after the writer’s death.

17

Often, the relative clause is inserted in the main clause. Note that qui and que may refer to either people or things.

L’employé que vous avez licencié l’an dernier, s’est installé en Nouvelle-Zélande.
The employee you laid off last year settled in New Zealand.

18

Often, the relative clause is inserted in the main clause. Note that qui and que may refer to either people or things.

La maison que vous apercevez sur la colline, appartient à un archéologue hollandais.
The house you see on the hill belongs to a Dutch archeologist.

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