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Flashcards in World War II Homework Deck (39)
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1

1. In the mid to late 1930s, the United States was unwilling to commit itself to working with other countries to restore stability to the world. This attitude was reflected in its foreign policy of
A) internationalism
B) isolationism
C) containment
D) globalism
E) flexible response

B) isolationism

2

2. During the 1930s, all of the following were examples of increased isolationist sentiment in the United States except
A) the Nye committee’s attack on war profiteering during World War I
B) the passage of Neutrality Acts that forbade the United States to sell arms to either side in any future war
C) the refusal of most Americans to become involved in conflicts in Europe and Asia
D) the ratification by the Senate of a treaty making the United States a member of the World Court
E) the passage of legislation to prevent the United States from entering the war

D) the ratification by the Senate of a treaty making the United States a member of the World Court

3

3. In the early 1930s, a step toward World War II occurred in Asia when Japan adopted a territorially aggressive policy toward
A) the Philippines
B) Vietnam
C) the Soviet Union
D) Korea
E) China

E) China

4

4. World War II began in the Far East when
A) Japan invaded Russia in 1937
B) Japan attacked Pearl Harbor in 1941
C) Japan made an alliance with Manchuria
D) Japan launched a full-scale invasion of China in 1937
E) Japan agreed to an alliance with Germany and Italy

D) Japan launched a full-scale invasion of China in 1937

5

(error)

C) Japan made an alliance with Manchuria

6

(error)

D) Japan launched a full-scale invasion of China in 1937

7

7. In 1929, a fascist-led government was in power in
A. Germany.
B. Spain.
C. Italy.
D. Japan.
E. France.

C. Italy.

8

8. Which of the following statements about the rise of Adolf Hitler in Germany is FALSE?
A. His rise was partially precipitated by ruinous inflation.
B. Hitler displayed a pathological anti-Semitism and a passionate militarism.
C. Hitler believed in the genetic superiority of the Aryan people.
D. Hitler argued in favor of extending German territory for the purpose of Lebensraum.
E. Upon coming to power in 1933, Hitler called his new government “the Weimar Republic.”

E. Upon coming to power in 1933, Hitler called his new government “the Weimar Republic.”

9

9. In 1932, the League of Nations, in response to the Japanese invasion of Manchuria,
A. issued warnings to the Japanese government, but little else.
B. imposed economic sanctions against Japan.
C. sent financial aid to Chiang Kai-shek’s government in China.
D. sent Europeans to Manchuria to train Chinese pilots.
E. called for Japanese recognition of the Open Door policy.

A. issued warnings to the Japanese government, but little else.

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10. During the 1930s, interest in pursuing an isolationist foreign policy
A. led the United States to give up its membership in the World Court.
B. reflected the sentiments of a majority of the American public.
C. led the U.S. Senate to assert that no single nation was a threat to world peace.
D. was strongly supported by President Franklin Roosevelt.
E. declined after the investigations chaired by Senator Gerald Nye of North Dakota.

B. reflected the sentiments of a majority of the American public.

11

11. The Munich Peace Conference of 1938 was precipitated by a crisis over
A. Austria.
B. Poland.
C. Hungary.
D. Belgium.
E. Czechoslovakia.

E. Czechoslovakia.

12

12. The Munich agreement of 1938
A. was the result of negotiations involving the League of Nations.
B. put most of Poland under German control.
C. ended further German aggression until World War II began.
D. was an act of appeasement.
E. was signed by Joseph Stalin despite misgivings about German intent.

D. was an act of appeasement.

13

13. Germany began World War II in Europe after
A. Germany’s occupation of additional areas of Czechoslovakia.
B. a nonaggression pact was signed between Germany and Russia.
C. France promised Poland it would provide military support if attacked.
D. Germany and Austria were unified.
E. Hitler’s violation of the Munich agreement.

B. a nonaggression pact was signed between Germany and Russia.

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14. By the middle of 1940, Germany had defeated
A. Norway.
B. Denmark.
C. France.
D. the Netherlands.
E. All these answers are correct.

E. All these answers are correct.

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15. In 1941, Germany’s declaration of war against the United States
A. occurred after the United States declared war on Germany.
B. came the same day that Japan attacked Pearl Harbor.
C. did not occur until two months after the attack on Pearl Harbor.
D. occurred before the United States declared war on Germany.
E. was never reciprocated by Congress.

D. occurred before the United States declared war on Germany.

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16. Who is considered the founder of fascism?
a. Benito Mussolini
b. Adolf Hitler
c. Francisco Franco
d. Joseph Stalin
e. Hideki Tojo

a. Benito Mussolini

17

17. Which statement about the Japanese-American internment is false?
a. The press supported the policy of internment almost unanimously.
b. The Supreme Court refused to intervene.
c. Japanese-Americans in Hawaii were exempt from the policy.
d. Japan used it as proof that America was racist toward nonwhite people.
e. Once the FBI did background checks on individuals they were free to leave the camps and return home.

e. Once the FBI did background checks on individuals they were free to leave the camps and return home.

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18. The policy followed by Britain and France toward Germany of giving concessions in hopes of avoiding war was called
a. isolationism.
b. détente.
c. internationalism.
d. appeasement.
e. provocation.

d. appeasement.

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19. What was the “final solution”?
a. The Allied operation for D-Day
b. Adolf Hitler’s plan to mass-exterminate “undesirable” peoples
c. The United States’ plan for the atomic bombs to be dropped on Japan
d. Japan’s plan to attack Pearl Harbor
e. Joseph Stalin’s plan to spread communism throughout the world

b. Adolf Hitler’s plan to mass-exterminate “undesirable” peoples

20

20. As fascism rose in Europe and Asia during the 1930s, most Americans
a. supported U.S. intervention.
b. supported U.S. neutrality.
c. wanted to move beyond isolationism.
d. remained ambivalent.
e. favored an end to international trade.

b. supported U.S. neutrality.

21

21. December 7, 1941, is known as a “date that will live in infamy,” referring to
a. the German invasion of Poland.
b. the Japanese assault on Indochina.
c. the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.
d. the German declaration of war against the United States.
e. Jeannette Rankin’s vote against a declaration of war.

c. the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

22

22. The Holocaust
a. was the spread of contagious disease in Asia.
b. was the mass extermination of millions of Jews and others in Nazi death camps.
c. included the dropping of the atomic bombs on Japan.
d. is the equivalent of D-Day.
e. was the mass slaughter of the Chinese during the Japanese invasion.

b. was the mass extermination of millions of Jews and others in Nazi death camps.

23

23. Government propaganda and war films portrayed the Japanese as
a. blameless victims of their own government.
b. similar to the Germans and Italians.
c. bestial and subhuman.
d. freedom fighters.
e. Communists.

c. bestial and subhuman.

24

24. The dropping of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki
a. had little impact on the course of the war.
b. did little damage and caused few casualties.
c. brought the war to an end but remains controversial.
d. brought the war to an end and caused no controversy.
e. was vetoed by President Truman.

c. brought the war to an end but remains controversial.

25

25. An immediate consequence of the Nazi-Soviet treaty of nonaggression in August 1939 was
A) Hitler's invasion of Poland.
B) a U.S. declaration of war against Germany.
C) the end of Hitler's aggression in Europe.
D) confirmation of the effectiveness of appeasement.

A) Hitler's invasion of Poland.

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26. World War II began in Europe with the
A) Japanese invasion of Manchuria in 1937.
B) German invasion of the Sudetenland in 1938.
C) Italian invasion of Ethiopia in 1935.
D) German invasion of Poland in 1939.

D) German invasion of Poland in 1939.

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27. The attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, was part of the Japanese plan to
A) knock out American naval bases in the Pacific.
B) demonstrate that the United States could not possibly win a war against an Asian nation.
C) demonstrate to the Germans that Japan had its own objectives in the Pacific.
D) retaliate against the United States for the incarceration of Japanese citizens.

A) knock out American naval bases in the Pacific.

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28. Just after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941,
A) proponents of neutrality in the United States stepped up their appeals in Congress to keep the nation out of war.
B) Congress endorsed President Roosevelt's call for a declaration of war.
C) Hitler and Mussolini offered to negotiate a peace.
D) Japan's emperor issued an official apology.

B) Congress endorsed President Roosevelt's call for a declaration of war.

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29. In 1942, President Roosevelt authorized the roundup and internment of all Americans of Japanese descent because
A) the government had evidence that Japanese Americans were a threat to national security.
B) many Americans believed that Japanese Americans were potential sources of espionage and subversion.
C) the government wanted to use strategically placed prison camps to prevent Japan from launching an air attack on the West Coast.
D) many male members of their families had refused to register for the draft.

B) many Americans believed that Japanese Americans were potential sources of espionage and subversion.

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30. All of the following were arguments for using the atomic bomb against Japan except
A) to end the war before Russia attacked the Japanese in Korea and Manchuria.
B) to demonstrate America's power and so advance American interests in the postwar world.
C) to save American lives.
D) to prevent Japan from launching its own superbomb.

D) to prevent Japan from launching its own superbomb.