1: Anatomy - Bony pelvis, pelvic fracture and labour Flashcards Preview

Reproduction Week 1 2018/19 > 1: Anatomy - Bony pelvis, pelvic fracture and labour > Flashcards

Flashcards in 1: Anatomy - Bony pelvis, pelvic fracture and labour Deck (26)
Loading flashcards...
1

What is another name for the hip bone?

Innominate bone

2

What are the three parts of each innominate bone?

Ilium

Ischium

Pubic bone

3

At which joints do the innominate bones

a) connect anteriorly

b) connect to the sacrum posteriorly?

a) Pubic symphysis

b) Sacroiliac joints

4

At which level does the dura end?

S2

Spinal cord ends at L2 (conus medullaris) but dura continues with the cauda equina

5

What spinal level is the transtubercular plane found at?

L5

6

Why is the ischial spine an important feature?

Sacrospinous ligament attaches to it

And the pudendal nerve traverses around the sacrospinous ligament

7

Which nerve twists around the sacrospinous ligament?

Pudendal nerve (S2-4)

8

Which muscle group attaches to the ischial tuberosity posteriorly?

Hamstrings group

Medial to lateral: semimembranosus, semitendinosus, biceps femoris

9

What happens to the sacrospinous and sacrotuberous ligaments during pregnancy?

Relaxation

10

Which bony feature of the ischium forms the inferior border of the obturator foramen?

Ischiopubic ramus

11

How does the pubic arch differ in appearance in males versus females?

Males - smaller angle (/\ shape)

Females - greater angle, wider pelvic inlet/outlet for childbirth

12

Where does the pelvis tend to fracture?

Multiple places

bony ring

13

Pelvic fractures often occur alongside joint ___.

dislocations

14

Which neurovascular structures may be disrupted by pelvic trauma?

Common iliac artery

Common iliac vein

Sacral plexus

15

Why is pelvic haemorrhage so dangerous?

Internal bleeding

Occurs without visible signs until life-threatening

16

What are the structural differences between the male and female pelvis?

In females:

deeper pubic arch

greater AP and transverse diameters of pelvic inlet and outlet

shallower pelvic cavity

compared to men

17

How many frontal bones does the foetal skull have?

Two

18

Which structures allow the bones of the foetal skull to move and slide over one another during childbirth?

Anterior and posterior fontanelles

19

When may the anterior and posterior fontanelles be

a) bulging

b) depressed?

a) Increased intracranial pressure (e.g hydrocephalus)

b) Malnutrition / dehydration

20

What are the three sutures found in the foetal skull?

Sagittal suture

Coronal suture

Lambdoid suture

21

What area is found within the borders made by the anterior and posterior fontanelles and the parietal prominences?

Vertex

22

In the context of childbirth, what is moulding?

Sliding of skull bones over one another

Reduces diameter of foetal head during childbirth

23

Which bony features form the pelvic inlet?

Sacral promontory

Ilium

Superior pubic ramus

Pubic symphysis

24

Which bony features form the pelvic outlet?

Pubic symphysis

Ischiopubic ramus

Ischial tuberosities

Sacrotuberous ligaments

Coccyx

25

The foetal head has frontotemporal (front to back) and biparietal (side to side) diameters.

Which diameter is greater?

Frontotemporal diameter > Biparietal diameter

i.e a newborn's head should be longer than it is wide

26

What ligaments form the

a) greater

b) lesser sciatic foramen?

a) GREATER SCIATIC FORAMEN - both

b) LESSER SCIATIC FORAMEN - both