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1

what can totalitarian state be defined in terms of?

3 criteria

2

what are the 3 criterias?

Whether the state controls absolutely all aspects of life (centralisation).
Secondly, whether the individual is subordinated to the state and lastly,
whether all forms of cultural and political opposition are suppressed.

3

what did Hitler and Nazi party implement?

implemented many policies of a totalitarian nature

4

what was inappropriate to term Nazi Germany was between 1933 and 1945?

inappropriate to term Nazi Germany a totalitarian state

5

1. when was enabling act passed?

On March 23rd 1933

6

1. what did enabling act grant?

Hitler absolute and full budgeting powers, and the right to make constitutional amendments, essentially - dictatorship.

7

1. what did enabling act and hitler's new power facilitate?

‘Gleichschaltung’, or synchronisation

8

1. what did Hitler sought to do?

either to abolish or gain centralised control over all alternate loyalties to Nazism.

9

1. e.g. of control?

Trade unions, for example, were abolished in May 1933 and subsumed into the collective “Labour Front” in October 1933.

10

1. why were Trade Unions abolished?

was so the Nazis could more easily review workers and identify dissenters.

11

1. what acted as turning point for "Minister of Armaments and War Production" Speer to gain greater freedom?

following Goebells “total war” speech in 1943

12

1. what centralised the German economy?

Initiatives such as the “Main Committees and Rings” and the “Central Planning Board”

13

1. what did centralisation of German economy result in?

totally re-gearing production mobile, “Blitzkreig” warfare to conventional warfare. Such policies are highly totalitarian

14

2. what does the term 'control' suggest?

detailed calculation

15

2. what did control rarely apply to?

This rarely applied to Nazi policy development

16

2. what did Hitler detest?

detested paperwork. He trusted that, from general verbal direction, appropriate policy would be developed.

17

2. what did Hitler also believe in?

“survival of the fittest.

18

2. what does Boszat suggest the survival of the fittest created?

this created a “polyocracy,” that is, a group of competitive authorities in conflict.

19

2. why did activities become increasingly extreme?

As Nazi hierarchy was based on pleasing authority, they vied for attention

20

2. what do specific historians term the survival of the fittest effect?

Structuralist historians, such as Ian Kershaw, term this “spiralling radicalisation”.

21

2. e.g. of such system?

The Nazi eugenics program, for instance, was sparked by a letter.

22

2. why was Nazi eugenics program initiated?

A father requested that he be able to kill his disabled child. An ambitious Nazi converted it into what would become national policy.

23

2. such chaos is not..?

a careful, solid totalitarian nature

24

3. what were German ppl subordinated to?

state

25

3. why were thousands of victims of eugenic program killed?

simply to uphold Nazi ideology’s notion of racial purity.

26

3. another example of strict subordination? why?

German children’s enthusiasm for organisations such as the ‘Hitler Youth’ or ‘League of German Maidens’ was placed secondary to the State’s desire to produce strong future soldiers and practical future mothers.

27

3. what exemplifies totalitarian with children?

By 1939, all ten-year old children were legally bound to enter the State youth system.

28

4. what is also another hallmark of tot?

cultural control

29

4. what was established 13th March, 1933?

Goebells’ ‘Ministry of Public Enlightenment and Propaganda,”

30

4. what did the Ministry do?

saturated the German people with Nazi ideology