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Flashcards in Aeneid secondary sources Deck (22)
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1

Progression of Dido

Williams: "admirable queen"
"pitiable rejected lover"
"Personification of madness and revenge"

2

Sympathy for Dido?

Williams: "so profound that we tend to reject the roman mission"

Camps: "decision to kill herself... the product of her own character"

3

Camilla

Morgan: "the plot is generated by women"

Reilly: "step out of traditional gender roles is doomed to fail"

4

Creusa

Jenkyns: "tribute to married love"

5

Lavinia

Oliensis: "prove their virtue precisely by submitting to the masculine plot of history"

6

war

Semple: "destruction of human happiness"
"virgil in truth hated war"

7

empire and war

Semple: "making of empire was very positive for the Romans"

8

peace

Adler: "he founds Rome by making a peace settlement in Italy"

Gransden: "In the way of peace and progress"

9

Other nations

Syed: "enable the Roman reader to work out what is really 'Roman' about them"

10

Italians

Syed: "Lavinia is a 'proper' Roman woman"

11

Empire and other nations

Nusbaumm: "length and breadth of the empire"
"nor is there forced conformity"

12

Praise of Augustus

Laird: "to justify Augustus' questionable regime"

Quinn: "another war and another man in mind"
"epic poem with himself as the hero"

Griffin: "divinely chosen, who would restore peace and order"

13

Critical of Augustus

Sowerby: "in the end, furor wins"

Jenkyns: "appears only three times"

Griffin: "climbed to tyranny over the bodies of his enemies"

14

Homer

Rutherford: "seeking to rival both Homeric epics"

15

Aeneas is dependant

Quinn: "wooden puppet lacking genuine human emotion"

16

Aeneas is pious

Williams: "epithet of pius"
Mackie: "general concern to facilitate fate"

17

Aeneas and relationships

Lyne: "interaction with others that were minimal"

18

free will

Camps: "free at any time to reject his divine mission"
"retain their human free will"

19

Fate

Camps: "may sometimes be postponed but not averted"
"power that is deaf to prayer" "No escape"

sowerby: "ugly manifestation of the malignant power of fate"

20

Piety

Camps: "only at the end of the poem that the prayer he addresses to her... is granted"

21

Gods

Camps: "irresponsible and heartless"

Gransden: "most of the plot of the Aeneid is generated by Juno"
Juno's reconciliation with fate "true resolution of the poem"

22

Turnus

“Drawn very simply, one Homeric lines” - Pattie

“All sympathy felt for him as the victim of inexorable fate” - Quinn