Ch. 21: Microbial Disease Od Skin And Eye Flashcards Preview

Microbiology > Ch. 21: Microbial Disease Od Skin And Eye > Flashcards

Flashcards in Ch. 21: Microbial Disease Od Skin And Eye Deck (47):
1

What is a nasty virulence factor associated with "GAS"?

M protein (Sticks out like fuzz on the gas)

2

What are the most common causes of TSS?

Staph and Step

3

What are the pathogens that cause chickenpox and shingles?

* Chickenpox: Varicella
* Shingles: Herpes Zoster

4

What kind of infection is chickenpox?

Acute Infection

5

What kind of infection shingles?

Latent Infection

6

What type of infection is herpes?

Latent Infection

7

What are the different types of herpes viruses?

HSV 1: Cold sores and fever blisters
HSV 2: Genitals all transmitted by sex

8

What do we give for herpes?

Acyclovir

9

Is there a vaccine for herpes?

No

10

Nurses are at risk for what and describe what it is?

Herpetic Whitlow. Herpes on the fingertips that you can contact from patients, the fingers here purpleish and have a bruise look on the fingertips

11

What's the vaccine for measles?

MMR, possibly the most contagious infection disease we know of

12

At what age do children get vaccinated for measles?

12 months because they don't have a robust immune system to respond to the vaccine prior to 12 months of age

13

How does airborne measles begin?

* As an upper respiratory infection, begins with a macular rash which becomes popular.
* The rash usually begins on the face and spreads downward and outward

14

From a clinical standpoint a cutaneous fungal infection can also be described as?

Cutaneous mycosis

15

What is a common term used for the cutaneous fungal infections?

Ringworm (Tinea barbae)

16

What do the formal names of cutaneous mycosis infection begin with?

Tinea

17

What's Tinea pedis, capitis, cruris and unguium?

* Pedis: athletes foot
* Capitis: Head fungus
* Cruris: Fungal infection of the genitals (groin)
* Unguium: Fungal infection of the nails (finger/toe)

18

Name some accessory structures of the integumentary

* Hair
* Nails
* Exocrine Glands
* Sensory Receptors

19

What's possibly the most contagious conjunctivitis bacteria?

Haemophilus Influenza

20

What is herpetic keratitis caused by (the pathogen)?

* HSV-1 (herpes simplex type 1 virus)
* Infection of the cornea resulting in deep ulcers
* Causes infections blindness

21

What is herpetic keratitis treated with?

Trifluridine

22

Staphylococcal bacteria can be broken up into two types of enzymes:

* Coagulase positive
* coagulase negative

23

Name the most famous coagulase negative staff:

* Staph aureus
* Boils, impetigo (A skin infection characterized as brown crusty lesions)
* TSS (Toxic Shock Syndrome, which is caused by a toxin)
* SSS (Scalded Skin Syndrome, top layers of the epidermis peels off, caused by a exfoliating toxin)

24

What's the most common genus species associated with streptococcal skin infection?

Streptococcal Pyogens

25

Pediculosis (Lice): An anthropod
What are the egg sacs called?

Nit, what immature lice pop out of

26

How do the lice pop out of the egg sac?

Take gulp in air and blow it out there anus, like a champagne cork

27

The healthcare community is concerned about super lice that have become resistant to?

Pyrethrins, medication that knocks them out at the larvae stage

28

Conjunctivitis

* Inflammation of the conjunctiva (pinkeye)
* Bacterial is worse than the virus
* Caused by haemophilus influenzae

29

Fungal Keratitis

* Filamentous fungi growing on the conjunctiva
* Caused by not disinfecting or changing out contact lenses and by fusarium fungi

30

What does Fungal Keratitis cause?

Fusarium, resistant to several drugs, tough to knock out

31

How is Fungal Keratitis treated?

Natamycin

32

The pathogen that causes pediculodis (lice)?

Pediculus Human Capitis

33

What pathogen causes trachoma?

Chlamydia trachomatis

34

What is strep pyogenes known as in a clinical setting

Group A Strep (GAS)

35

What happens after the lesions of chickenpox clear up?

The virus often migrates close to the spinal cord along the sensory nerves

36

Where does shingles hang out?

* Dorsal root ganglion, which are just outside the spinal cord.
* It's where the cell bodies of the sensory nerves are congregated
* The ganglion are just outside the spinal cord. They hang out in those neurons and cell bodies dormant, sometimes in the future there's a triggering events where they migrate back out to the site on the skin where the lesions appear

37

Where does herpes hang out?

It migrates along the facial cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve ganglion dormant, until periodic episodes and migrates back and forms the lesions

38

Infections by HSV 2 encephalitis has a mortality rates as high as_______, and if you survive you'll probably have some type of brain damage

70%

39

Where can you get herpes infection?

In the eye, passing through the birth canal

40

What's one indicator of measles besides the rash?

Koplik spots in the throat, red spots that have a bluish white center (found only in measles)

41

Measles is caused by what pathogen?

Measles virus

42

What pathogen causes pediculodis (lice)?

Pediculus Humanus Capitis

43

What pathogen causes candidiasis?

Candida albicans

44

What are some types of candida?

* Vaginosis
* Oral (thrush)
* Obese individuals have it within their skin folds (breast/fat)
* Oropharyngeal

45

What kind of pneumonia is strep pneumoniae referred to in a clinical setting?

Pneumococcal

46

Measles (Rubeola) facts:

* High mortality rate worldwide
* No animal reservoir, seems to be an exclusively human disease
* Very contagious and respiratory transmission
* Leaving childhood killer

47

Scabies

Mites, it's mange in dogs