Chapter 11- Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma/Leukemia (NHL) Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Chapter 11- Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma/Leukemia (NHL) Deck (28)
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1

Acute lymphoblastic
leukemia/lymphoma (ALL)
Pathologic Cells

MC pre-B cells, but pre-T cells are possible (lymphoma)

2

Acute lymphoblastic
leukemia/lymphoma (ALL)
Patients

Children and adolescents
a) Pre-B cells: age 4
b) Pre-T cells: age
15-20

3

Acute lymphoblastic
leukemia/lymphoma (ALL)
Unique Features

Aggressive, represents 80% of childhood leukemia diagnosis.
Marrow suppression with
pancytopenia is common, bone pain, generalized lymphadenopathy, fever,
hepatosplenomegaly

4

Acute lymphoblastic
leukemia/lymphoma (ALL)
Prognosis

Improved prognosis: females, age 2-10
Most (80%) cured following chemotherapy

5

Chronic lymphocytic
leukemia (CLL) /small
lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL)
Pathologic Cells

Mature B cells

6

Chronic lymphocytic
leukemia (CLL) /small
lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL)
Patients

Older adults,
average age at
diagnosis is age 60,
males are twice as
likely to develop CLL

7

Chronic lymphocytic
leukemia (CLL) /small
lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL)
Unique Features

Most common leukemia of
adults.
Indolent course, commonly associated with immune abnormalities (hypogammaglobulinemia).

CLL is more common than SLL and primarily involves marrow
SLL = < 4,000 lymphocytes/μL and involves lymph nodes
Displaces normal marrow and produces pancytopenia

8

Chronic lymphocytic
leukemia (CLL) /small
lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL)
Prognosis

Variable life expectancy, median is 4-6 years after diagnosis

9

Follicular lymphoma
Pathologic Cells

Mature B cells

10

Follicular lymphoma
Patients

Adults > age 50

11

Follicular lymphoma
Unique Features

t(14,18), abnormal BCL2 gene that promoted B cell survival, 40% of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, may transition to
diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), painless generalized
lymphadenopathy, centrocytes

12

Follicular lymphoma
Prognosis

Median survival is 7-9 years after diagnosis, incurable
Prognosis is much worse with DLBCL transition: ~1 year

13

Mantle cell lymphoma
Pathologic Cells

Mature B cells

14

Mantle cell lymphoma
Patients

Adults > age 50,
males

15

Mantle cell lymphoma
Unique Features

t(11;14), cyclin D1 dysfunction,
abnormal B cells are found in mantle zones of lymph nodes

16

Mantle cell lymphoma
Prognosis

Median survival is 3-5 years after diagnosis, incurable

17

Diffuse large B cell lymphoma
Pathologic Cells

Mature B cells

18

Diffuse large B cell lymphoma
Patients

Most commonly
adults (age 60), but
is also 15% of
lymphomas in kids

19

Diffuse large B cell lymphoma
Unique Features

Most common lymphoma of adults, aggressive, large cellular morphology

20

Diffuse large B cell lymphoma
Prognosis

Rapidly fatal without Tx.
(chemotherapy), 80% go into remission with chemo., 50% of
those treated are eventually cured

21

Burkitt lymphoma
Pathologic Cells

Mature B cells

22

Burkitt lymphoma
Patients

Children in Africa

23

Burkitt lymphoma
Unique Features

Once of the fastest growing tumors, extranodal sites are
commonly involved (e.g.
mandible, maxillae), past EBV infection is a risk factor, “starry sky” cellular appearance, MYC gene mutations

24

Burkitt lymphoma
Prognosis

Most patients are cured following aggressive chemotherapy

25

Multiple myeloma
Pathologic Cells

Plasma cells

26

Multiple myeloma
Patients

Older adults, average Dx. is age 70, males, individuals of African descent

27

Multiple myeloma
Unique Features

Progressive features, myeloma nephrosis from Bence-Joens proteins, M-spike, “punched out” osteolytic lesions of the
vertebrae and calvaria,
pathologic fracture, bone pain, hypercalcemia, anemia

28

Multiple myeloma
Prognosis

Survival is 4-6 years after diagnosis,
incurable