Clicker Questions Lectures 1-4 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Clicker Questions Lectures 1-4 Deck (44):
1

Boyle's Law: When the chest wall expands, volume of the lungs increases, alveolar pressure (blank) and air flows (blank) to the lungs. 

decreases

in

2

The peural linkage attaches the (blank) to the (blank) 

lungs

ribs

3

The interosseous portion of the internal intercostal smuscle is active during

expiration

4

The ratio of inspiration to expiration for rest breathing is (blank), while the ratio is (blank) during breating for speech. 

40-60

10-90

5

Quiet breathing often requires the use of accessory inspiratory muscles of the neck, chest, abdomen and back

True or False? 

False

6

Which of the following is an important abdominal muscle of expiration? 

Transverse abdominis

7

Vital capacity it (blank) 

the amount of air exchanged during maximal exhalation followed by a maximal inhalation

8

Resting lung volume is

the percent of vital capacity at which the forces of lung collapse are equaled by the forces of chest wall exapansion which occurs at 38-40% of VC

9

True or False? On the pressure relaxation curve, one can see that if a speaker took a very deep breath (for example 90% VC), there would be considerable pressure on the chest wall to collapse

True

10

At high lung volumes, pressure on teh chest wall to collapse during speech is counteracted by (blank) 

gradual relaxation of the muscles of inspiration (checking action) 

11

The Typical respiratory position for speech and singing is (blank) 

to keep the abdominal wall held inward (contracted), thereby elongatin the diaphragm and thoracic expiratory muscles, permitting rapid contraction

12

One of the major biological functions of the larynx is to 

protect the respiratory system from food and liquid

13

Elasticity means that a body is capable of being deformed (stretched, compressed, ect) and then (blank) 

returning to its normal configuration

14

During vocal fold vibration, (blank) is typically a forced to close, while (blank ) is a forrce to open

the Bernoulii Forc

15

True or False? 

During vocal fold vibration, the action of the muscles of adduction alternate with the action of the muscles of abduction to maintain the vibratory motion of the vocal folds

true

16

True or False? 

Although longer and more massive the vocal folds vibrate more slowly than shorter and less massive vocal folds, raising pitchin an individual speaker is achieved primarily through stretcing the vocal folds

 

true

17

The true vocal folds are made up of the vocal processes of the arytenoids cartilages, the epithelial cover, the vocal ligament and the (blank) 

thyrovocalis muscle

18

Vocal folds that are abdcted are (blank) 

open

19

The muscles of medial compression are the (blank) and the (blank) 

lateral cricoarytenoids 

interarytenoids

20

True or False? 

The periodic wave produced by the vocal fold vibration is complex becasue the different vibratory movements of the three layers of lamina propria and the tyrovocalis muscle. 

True

21

The laryngeal spectrum consists of (blank)

The fundamental frequency plus whole-number multiples of the fundamental frequency

22

The primary muscles of pitch elevation are the _______________, but they can be supplemented by the action of the ___________________.

cricothyroids

 

23

The primary muscles of pitch lowering are the (blank) but they can be supplemented by teh actio nof the (blank) 

 

thyromuscularis muscles

infrahyoids

24

increased intensity requires increased

subglottal pressure

25

For loud voices (high intensity), the closed phase of the glottal cycle is (blank) compared to soft voices (low intensity) 

longer

26

Two of the important muscles of the pharynx are the (blank) and the (blank) 

middle constrictors

stylopharyngeus

27

Two muscles that open the velopharyngeal port during speech are the (blank) and the (blank) 

palatoglossus

palatopharyngeus

28

Two extrinsic muscles of the tongue the styloglossus and the palatoglossus, move the back (posterior) part of the tongue up and back but only (blank) extrinsic muscle moves the tongue up and forward

genioglossus

29

Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM) is characterized by all of the following except

a patttern of vibration that can be graphically represented as a complex wave

30

As the tine of a vibrating tuning fork moves toward its rest position, the (blank) increases

force of inertia

31

Amplitude of vibration initally depends on teh amount of force applied to the oscillator; but if no additional force is appliaed to the oscillator the vibration will become (blank) 

damped

32

As a vibrating body moves AWAY from its rest position and toward teh point of maximusm displacement, its elasticity or tendency to resist deformation

increases

33

34

If the period of a sound wave is 0.5 ms, what is its frequency? 

2,000 Hz

35

As the motion of an oscillator is conveyed to the air molecules surroundin git, the wave travels (is propagated) as periods of (blank) 

compression and rarefaction

36

True or False

A single air molecule can travel for hundreds of yards in response to the movement of an oscillator

false

37

If two waves with the same frequency are 180 degrees out of phase, the resulting sound would be (blank)

silence

38

Periodic complex waves contain

multiple frequencies that are harmonically related

39

The fundamental frequency of a tone with harmonics at 300 Hz, 450 Hz, and 600 Hz is (blank) 

150 Hz

40

A line spectrum is different from a waveform in that (blank) 

a. the line spectrum shows the amplitude of frequency components, while the waveform does not

the waveform shows each harmonic component, while the line spectrum does not

the waveform shows changes over time, while the line spectrum does not 

both A and C

both A and C

41

Intensity is converted to dB by (blank)

comparing the intensity of the observed sound to a reference sound, taking the log of the ratio and multiplying by 10 

42

The Phon Scale shows (blank) 

how listeners' percetions of intensity differ from actual measures of intensity

43

in order to calculate wavelength, one needs to know (blank) 

the speed of sound

44