Closing Volume and Capacity Flashcards Preview

Apex 1 - 2 Respiratory II: Physiology (24) > Closing Volume and Capacity > Flashcards

Flashcards in Closing Volume and Capacity Deck (34)
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1

Lung volume above residual volume where the small airways begin to collapse during expiration is known as:

Closing volume

2

The sum of closing volume and residual volume is known as:

Closing capacity

3

True or False

As a person exhales, there is a point where pleural pressure exceeds airway pressure.

True

4

As a person exhales, there is a point where pleural pressure exceeds airway pressure. This external force collapses the

Small airways that lack cartilage

5

As a person exhales, there is a point where pleural pressure exceeds airway pressure. This external force collapses the small airways that lack cartilage and traps

gas distally in the alveoli

6

Pleural pressure is higher in which region of the lung?

A. Dependent region of the lung

B. Non-Dependent region of the lung

Dependent region of the lung

 

 

7

As a person exhales, there is a point where pleural pressure exceeds airway pressure. This external force collapses the small airways that lack cartilage and traps gas distally in the alveoli. Why do airways close in the Dependent region of the lung first?

 

Pleural pressure is higher in the Dependent region of the lung

8

The point at which dynamic compression of the airways begins is known as:

Closing Volume

9

The volume above residual volume where the small airways begin to close during expiration is called:

Closing Volume

10

Factors that increase closing volume include:

(Mnemonic: CLOSE-P)

COPD

Left ventricular failure

Obesity

Supine position

Extremes of age

Pregnancy

11

The absolute volume of gas contained in the lungs when the small airways begin to collapse is known as:

Closing Capacity

12

The sum of closing volume and residual volume (CC = Closing Volume + Residual Volume) is called:

Closing Capacity

13

What will determine if the airways collapse during tidal breathing?

A. Closing volume

B. Relationship between functional residual capacity and closing capacity

 

B. Relationship between functional residual capacity (FRC) and closing capacity (CC)

While closing volume is very important, the relationship between functional residual capacity and closing capacity is of much greater importance, because this will determine if the airways collapse during tidal breathing

14

True or False

Under normal circumstances, FRC is greater than CC

True

Under normal circumstances, FRC is greater than CC

(airways do not collapse during tidal breathing).

15

When CC is greater than FRC, how does this impact airway closure?

Airway closure occurs during tidal breathing

16

When CC is greater than FRC, airway closure occurs during tidal breathing. This contributes to which two respiratory complications?

Intrapulmonary shunting

&

Hypoxemia

17

Anything that decreases FRC relative to CC or anything that increases CC relative to FRC will convert normal V/Q units to:

Low V/Q units

or

Shunt units

18

Anything that decreases FRC relative to CC or anything that increases CC relative to FRC will convert normal V/Q units to low V/Q units or shunt units.

PEEP can reverse this process by:

Increasing the FRC relative to CC

19

In a young, healthy patient airway closure occurs just above which lung volume?

Residual volume

20

As we age, pleural pressure becomes progressively:

higher

21

As we age, pleural pressure becomes progressively higher such that the small airways begin to close

sooner and at higher lung volumes

22

The progressive reduction in PaO2 that occurs with aging can be explained by:

As we age, pleural pressure becomes progressively higher such that the small airways begin to close sooner and at higher lung volumes

23

Consequences of Aging on FRC:

Increased FRC

24

Consequences of Aging on closing capacity:

Increased  closing capacity

25

Consequences of Aging on residual volume:

Increased residual volume

26

Consequences of Aging on vital capacity:

Decreased vital capacity

27

CC~ FRC when under general anesthesia by age:

30

28

CC~ FRC when supine by age:

44

29

CC~ FRC when standing by age:

66

30

Why can't Spirometry measure closing volume and closing capacity

(it doesn't measure residual volume),