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Flashcards in Deception Deck (26)
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1

DePaulo et al 1996, lying in every day life

college students said they lie in 2 out of 3 exchanges. why? to protect privacy/ others/ self/ make them feel good/ avoid feeling bad/ avoid conflict

2

deception is interactional: both deceiver's and detector's goals, expectations, and knowledge have an impact on their thoughts and behaviours as the interaction unfolds.

Interpersonal deception theory

3

Elliot 1979- high self monitors riggio and friedman 1983 - people skilled at communicating basic emotion Riggio tucker and widaman 1987- people more extroverted, dominant, non- anxious, and exhibitionistic Zuckerman 1981- males are better at not being detected, and females tend to restrict non-verbal behaviour

Who is better at detection?

4

1)"he wouldn't lie to me" 2) "I'd know if he was lying"

examples of buller and burgoon 1996 truth/lie bias

5

Factors influencing detection- DePaulo 1985

people tend to perceive others as deceptive when they gaze less, smile less, shift posture more, speak slowly, take a long time to answer -some differences might lead to prediction in some to be more suspicious of more trusting- could lead to less accuracy Buller and burgoon 1996- truth/ lie bias

6

Which lies are easier to get away with?

prepared lies

shorter lies

lies about feelings rather than facts

7

Deception strives for persuasive ends - it attempts to influence beliefs, attitudes, and behaviours through message distortion

Miller and stiff 1993, deception definition

8

Miller and stiff 1993, deception definition

Deception strives for persuasive ends - it attempts to influence beliefs, attitudes, and behaviours through message distortion

9

strategic deception

manipulate/ withhold information; control behaviour; manage image

10

do some situations make deception more difficult?

depends on motivation- if there are more serious consequences then deception can be more difficult

11

interpersonal suspicion can affect deceiver and detector- if you think you are suspected or if you think they suspect that you suspect them etc

Role of suspicion-

12

Zuckerman and driver 1985, four factor model

-seeks to explain why people behave differently when lying

1) arousal- usually found in sociopaths, can lead to speech errors, eye blinking, leg movement

2) attempted control- preparing to be interrogated, less accurate detection if watching heads and faces compared to watching bodies.

3) felt emotions- less facial pleasantness because deceptive behaviour is associated with negative emotions. some liars may experience delight at success with deception

4) cognitive factors- lying requires more rethinking than telling the truth, longer response times, less detail in message

13

some behaviours may 'leak out' e.g. blinks, pupil dilation, less smiling

Non-strategic deception

14

we are better at judging truths than we are at judging lies - people report telling very few lies in everyday situations

Veracity effect- levine et al 1999

15

-seeks to explain why people behave differently when lying

1) arousal- usually found in sociopaths, can lead to speech errors, eye blinking, leg movement

2) attempted control- preparing to be interrogated, less accurate detection if watching heads and faces compared to watching bodies.

3) felt emotions- less facial pleasantness because deceptive behaviour is associated with negative emotions. some liars may experience delight at success with deception

4) cognitive factors- lying requires more rethinking than telling the truth, longer response times, less detail in message

Zuckerman and driver 1985, four factor model

16

prepared lies

shorter lies

lies about feelings rather than facts

Which lies are easier to get away with?

17

college students said they lie in 2 out of 3 exchanges. why? to protect privacy/ others/ self/ make them feel good/ avoid feeling bad/ avoid conflict

DePaulo et al 1996, lying in every day life

18

Who is better at detection?

Elliot 1979- high self monitors

riggio and friedman 1983 - people skilled at communicating basic emotion

Riggio tucker and widaman 1987- people more extroverted, dominant, non- anxious, and exhibitionistic

Zuckerman 1981- males are better at not being detected, and females tend to restrict non-verbal behaviour

19

Veracity effect- levine et al 1999

we are better at judging truths than we are at judging lies - people report telling very few lies in everyday situations

20

depends on motivation- if there are more serious consequences then deception can be more difficult

do some situations make deception more difficult?

21

manipulate/ withhold information; control behaviour; manage image

strategic deception

22

examples of buller and burgoon 1996 truth/lie bias

1)"he wouldn't lie to me" 2) "I'd know if he was lying"

23

Role of suspicion-

interpersonal suspicion can affect deceiver and detector- if you think you are suspected or if you think they suspect that you suspect them etc

24

Non-strategic deception

some behaviours may 'leak out' e.g. blinks, pupil dilation, less smiling

25

people tend to perceive others as deceptive when they gaze less, smile less, shift posture more, speak slowly, take a long time to answer

-some differences might lead to prediction in some to be more suspicious of more trusting- could lead to less accuracy Buller and burgoon 1996- truth/ lie bias

Factors influencing detection- DePaulo 1985

26

Interpersonal deception theory

deception is interactional: both deceiver's and detector's goals, expectations, and knowledge have an impact on their thoughts and behaviours as the interaction unfolds.