Drug Therapies AO1 Flashcards Preview

AQA A-Level Psychology Paper 3 Schizophrenia > Drug Therapies AO1 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Drug Therapies AO1 Deck (15)
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1
Q

What do antipsychotics reduce?

A

Positive symptoms

2
Q

What are the 2 types of antipsychotics?

A

Atypical

Typical

3
Q

Give an example of a typical antipsychotic?

A

Chlorpromazine

4
Q

What does Chlorpromazine do?

A

Initially causes a build-up of dopamine to reduce its production, thus normalising neurotransmission in key areas and reducing symptoms

5
Q

What is an alternative use for Chlorpromazine?

A

Also used as a Sedative for patients that are first admitted into the hospital

6
Q

What do typical antipsychotics do?

A

They reduce the action of the neurotransmitter by blocking dopamine receptors in the synapse

7
Q

What do typical antipsychotics target?

A

Dopamine levels - they are a Dopamine Antagonist

***So there are strong associations with the Dopamine Hypothesis

8
Q

What do Atypical Antipsychotics target?

A

Dopamine and Serotonin Levels

9
Q

Why were Atypical Antipsychotics developed?

A

To maintain/improve the effectiveness of drugs in suppressing symptoms while also reducing their side effects

10
Q

What are the 2 types of atypical antipsychotics?

A

Risperidone

Clozapine

11
Q

What is a major side effect of Clozapine?

A

Agranulocytosis aka a severe blood condition

12
Q

How does Clozapine work?

A

It binds to dopamine receptors but also acts of serotonin and glutamate receptors

13
Q

When is Clozapine prescribed?

A

When the patient is at high risk of suicide b/c Clozapine is thought to improve mood and decrease depression and anxiety

14
Q

How does Risperidone work?

A

Binds to dopamine and serotonin receptors, but binds more strongly to dopamine receptors than Clozapine

15
Q

When is Risperidone most effective?

A

When it is taken in small doses for approx 2 weeks