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Flashcards in Exam 3 Deck (347):
1

Functions of Blood

-Transport -- O2, nutrients, hormones, water Co2, waste -Prootection-- WBC travel in blood and monitor for pathogens, Clotting factors protect us from blood loss -Temp. regulation- blood flows closer to surface when we are hot (cooling) and closer to core when cold (keep organs warm

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How much blood in body?

5-5.5L

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plasma

liquid part of blood -mostly water more viscous than water-- has proteins is salty (0.9% NaCl) 3L of the 5-5.5L of blood is plasma

4

formed elements

"chunks" in blood: blood cells, fragments of cells (platelets

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RBC

erythrocytes 4.5-5.5 million/mL Carry O2 also can carry Co2, H+, CO

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WBC

leukocytes 5-10 thousand /mL immunity- protect from pathogens and cancers

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Platelets

thrombocytes 200-400 thousand/mL help clot/ prevent blood loss

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Most dense in blood

packed RBC, makes up 42% of volume

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medium dense in blood,

white cells, <1%

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least dense in blood

plasma, 58% includes clotting factors

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serum

our plasma with clotting factors removed

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What makes up plasma?

90% Water, 8% plasma proteins (from liver): albumin, gamma globulin, fibrinogen 2% small molecules, N, K, Ca, C, disolved gasses (O2, CO2, N2), nutrients such as glucose and AA

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Albumin

most abundant, osmotic regulator (Reduces edema), and increases viscocity keeps water in the blood, as apposed to leaking out into tissues

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Gamma globulin

antibodies, protect from pathogens

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fibrinogen

part of clotting mechanism, during bleeding they become insoluble (precipitate out_ and form a fibrous network become a net when exposed to O2 to hold RBC in the body

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Various protein carriers

carry hydrophobic molecuels that don't dissolve in blood, and need to be carried by proteins that do ex. transferrin, LDL, HDL

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transferrin

a protein carrier that carries iron

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Red blood cell production

Are formed in the bone marrow and are released as fully mature and differentiated -incapable of mitosis- have no nucleus so always making new ones in the bone marrow

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Red bone marrow

has hematopoetic stem cells that give rise to RBC, WBC, and platelets infants have red bone marrow in most of their vones, but adults only have it in a few.

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RBC Development

No nucleus biconcave shape-- more surface area for diffusion of O2 and CO2 flexible, can squeeze though tight spaces Gain Hb ER, mitochondria, shrink and disappear cytoplasm shrink mature RBC is 1/3 the size of immature

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Whats inside RBC?

no mitochondria=no respiration, only glycolysis No ER- can't repair themselves if hurt Hb- carries O2

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Hemoglobin

iron containing protein undergoes shape change when it binds light red when bound to O2 dark red when not bound to O2

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Hematocrit

measues %RBC of total blood volume, says how much O2 you can carry around your body

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normal hematocrit for men

40-50%

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normal hematocrit for women

38-46%

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Anemia

less than a normal value for hematocrit don't mka eenough or body is destroying them

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blood doping

more RBC--> more o2 in blood

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RBC lifespan

120 days - body replaces its entire blood volume every 120 days, or 1% a day -need enough energy and iron to maintain this production

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WBC lifespan

variable 6 hrs- 80+ years

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platelet lifespan

10 days

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RBS breakdown and recycling

liver and spleen iron released into plasma, bound to transferrin and brought to bone marrow for new RBC to be made with it

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ferritin

liver place for storage of excess iron

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Too much iron

gets deposited in liver, can lead to liver issues

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folic acid

dietary soure of precursor to the nucleic acid thymine

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deficiency in folic acid

halts all cell division will not make all the eclls you need on a daily basis all mitosis haulted RBC are first indicator, within one week you'll lose 7% of blood cell volume-- leads to fatigue and weakness

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B12

needed in order for folic acid to be used. Comes strictly from animal products, meas begans can get anemia

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Erythropoietin

hormone released by the kidneys that triggers red blood cell division and maturation If O2 delivery to kitdey falls below a certain point it will release more erythropoietin, which will result in increased production of RBC testosterone can also trigger erythropoietin

38

When does O2 delivery to kidney's decrease?

-prolonged high altitude exposure -insufficient pumping of heart -lung disease -anemia -prolonged exercise -problems with Hb

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What decreases O2 carrying capacity (ie what causes anemia)?

-impaired RBC capacity -increased RBC destruction -blood loss-- injury, menstruation -a combination

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Pernacious anemia

a lack of B12

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iron deficiency anemia

if not taking in enough iron--> can't synthesize Hb can sometimes be used as a strategy for pathogen evasion-- if we decrease our iron, the microbes can't have it to live in us and will kill them off

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Sickle cell anemia

irregularly shaped RBC, genetic disorder have enough, but they can't carry O2 in the right way

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Polycythemia

-too many RBCs -happens in doping, high altitude dwellers and in some forms of cancer -blood becomes too thick -causes a strain on the heart, decreased flow through vessels, can lead to death by blood clots

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Co2 and O2 transport

-Co2 and o2 are small, non polar molecules can difuse through membrances and dissolve in liquids-- but this is not sufficient (ex. diffusion from lung all the way to toes would take too long) -transport of both can be enhanced by Hb

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O2 gas transport

-97% carried on RBC heme groups of hemoglobin bind O2 3% dissolved in plasma (this is the only portion that can be detected

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CO2 gas transport

23% on RBC 7% dissolved in plasma 70% carried as bicarbonate

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relationship between PO2 and Hb saturation

is not linear-- bind more O2 if there is more of it around

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hemoglobin

each have 4 heme groups. one Hb can pick up 4 O2 at a time ability to pick up and release O2 is influenced by environment: pH and CO2 levels in tissues surrounding the capillary bed Can also carry NO, CO2, H+ and CO When one heme group binds O2, the entire structure changes making it easier to bind another O2, making it easier for 3rd etc. (reverse is also true, with releasing O2

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HB saturations when [O2] is high, ie PO2 is high (~100mmHg)

Hb is very saturated (98% of Hb is saturated)

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HB saturations when [O2] is low, ie PO2 is below 60mmHg

Less Hb is saturated

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Hb affinity and O2 conc.

When there is a high conc of O2, the affinity for O2 is high, when the Hb reaches an low O2 area, it will have less affinity and will release the O2 to that area

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Fetal Hb

has a higher affinity for O2 than adult Hb. In pregnancy the uterine capillaries lose O2 to the placental apillaries due to the difference in affinity

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In which environment would Hb have a higher affinity for O2? PO2 of 100mmHg or PO2 of 35mmHg?

PO2 of 100mmHg

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What [NaCl] is isotonic to blood?

0.9% NaCl

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Where is transferrin

It is plasma protein that moves iron from the spleeen to the bone marrow to recycle it and make new RBC

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Can iron deficiciey anemia result from infection even if the diet is fine?

Yes-- body decreases iron to kill off pathogens (who need it for survival)

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Temperature effecy on Hb saturation

Hb has a lower affinity for O2 at higher temperatures -will have high temp. due to exercise, fever, and excess cell. resperation --helps to remove CO2 and bring O2 to areas that are doing more cellular respiration (which produces heat)

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Hb affinity for CO

Hb has 250X the affinity for CO as O2, sobinds preferentually-- and it can't unbind this is why you become asphixiated when CO is in the air-- takes RBC 's out of commision

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What can Hb bind?

O2, CO2, CO, H+

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Why does Hb bind H+?

more H+--> denaturation of proteins binds them and shuttles them out of the body to protect them

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CO2 transport

7% of CO2 dissolves in plasma 70% is converted into bicarb 23% binds to Hb

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Co2 --> bicarb equation

H20+CO2H2Co3H+ +HCO3 H2CO3=carbonic acid HCo3=bicarb H+ used in stomach HCO3-- used to neutralize in SI

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acid

any substance that can dissociate into H+

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Why must we breathe out

otherwise we will become acidic inside

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Nase

anything that reduces the H+ concentration in an environment

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Bohr effect

decrease pH=more acid=more CO2-->Hb releases O2 makes Hb free to bind H+ and CO2 to get them out of the body

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Hb and acidity

Hb O2 binding affinity is INVERSELY proportional to eh ACIDITY and concentration of CO2 in the blood. decrease in pH (or increase of CO2) Hb will release bound CO2

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What happens if there is a decrease in pH

Hb will release bound O2 Hb will have a LOWER AFFINITY for O2

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What happens if there is an increase in blood Co2

Hb will release bound O2 Hb will have a LOWER AFFINITY for O2

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what happens if there is an increase in blood pH

Hb will retain bound O2 Hb will have a HIGHER AFFINITY for O2

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What happens if there is a decrease in CO2 concentration

Hb will retain bound O2 Hb will have a HIGHER AFFINITY for O2

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Thrombocytes

small fragments cells called megakaryocytes in bone marrow pinch off cytosplasm to make platelets no nucleus, small amount of ER so it can make chemicals involved clotting

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megakaryocytes

large cell in bone marro that pinch off cytoplasm to make platelets

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hemostasis

the stoppage of blood loss platelets gather and recruit fibrinogen

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collagen

in connective tissue, binds platelets. When there is vessel damage the connective tissue is exposed

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Platelet activation

platelets and collagen bind, activates platelets and releases secrectory vesicles that help clotting process --autocrine- platelets stick to each other --paracrine-- make platelets contract and compress to form a plug

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prothrombin

a plasma protein that is cleaved into thrombin

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thrombin

enzyme acts to make fibrinogen into fibrin monomers which then polymerize into the fibrin net

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fibrin net

made up of polymerized fibrin monomers-- in the presence of oxygen.

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fibrinogen

broken down into fibrin monomers by thrombin, used to make the fibrin net (in the presence of oxygen)

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Leukocytes

Whate blood cells 5,000-10,000/ml but varies based on infection use blood as freeway system to get to body parts-- but majority of their life is spent in tissues -act as immune defense -use inflammation

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low WBC count

immunocompromised

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High WBC count

actively fighting an infection

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What does thrombin do?

acts as a enzyme to slices fibinogen into fibrin

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Plug

compressed platelets with no protein net

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At high pH what would Hb affinity be like for O2

high affinity for O2-holds on

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Low CO2-- what would Hb affinity be like for O2?

high affinity for O2

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40C temp-- what would affinity be like for O2

doing a lot of cellular respiration--so more O2 being used, so decreased affinity for O2

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pathogen

a disease causing agent

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antigen

a specific piece of the pathogen recognized by the immune system. Has an outer coating that our immune system recognizess

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what is immune system

made up of skin (barrier immunity), mucus (barrier immunity), WBCs and lymph nodes -protects you from invasion of things that don't belong (bacteria, viruses, and parasites) and cancer can be bad if it doesn't work enough, or if it overreacts

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lymphnodes

anatomical locations where immune cells can communicate and develop

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bacteria

single celled reproduce on their own-- binary fission can share DNA with other bacteria by proximity have no nucleus have a first and last name (ex. E. Coli) -most do no harm (only 1% are infectious)

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how much bacteria in the body?

outnumber our own cells by 9-1

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How quickly do bacteria reprouce

20-45 min

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viruses

cann't reproduce or unergo metabolism on their own -insert their DNA into ours and we reproduce them -usually 100s of copies of our virus cell -the host cell is destroyed -when not contained within a cell they go dormant for hours/years -mutate their own genome often have very small genome -we have no treatment for most viruses

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Examples of viruses

Colds (coronaviruses and rhunoviruses), HIv, Hepatitis, Influenze

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Funcus

-reproduce on own -have a nucleus -cause disease in the immunocompromised -must live in symbiosis in us -ex. yeast infection (Candida albicans) and athletes food

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Parasites

multicellular pathogens must be transmiited from one host to another can reproduce on their own ex. tapeworms, malaria, flukes, fleas, elephentitis (worm in lymph system)

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self v. non selg

you'r body learns during debelopment which proteins are "self", eliminates enzymes that work against self proteins -- then any thing else is treated as foreign and attacked by the immune system

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How does the immune system work

3 lines of defense: 1. barriers 2. innate 3. Specific

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first line of defense in immune system

barriers-- mucus, skin

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2nd line of defense

innate--inflammation when foreign invaders are found chemicals-- cytokines to coordinate immune system and cause fever -macrophages and neutrophils engulf bacteria, clean up cellular debris, coordinate response

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third line of defense

specific--- specialized cells to kill off leukocytes-learn about pathogen, remmeber it and make a specific response: antibodies, cells to kill pathogen

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inflammation

2nd line of defense -blood vessels dialate, WBC, chemicals and plasma to the area of infection, pain prevents further injury

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macrophages and neutrophils

engulf bacteria, clean up cellular debris, coordinate response 2nd line of defense

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leukocytes

3rd line of defense. learn about the pathogen, remember is and make a specific respose including: cells that kill the pathogen and any infected cells antibodies that can float in blood and disable pathogen

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B Cells

make antibodies that are SPECIFIC to the pathogen can last for decades

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Helper T cells

recruit other cells to sites of infection talk to macrophages to learn about pathogen, -coordinate entire adaptive immune responses including telling B cells when to make antibodies

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killer t cells

kill infected cells or the pathogen - kil cells that are infected with intracellular pathogens

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Macrophages

clean up waste and extracellular pathogens can activate B an T cells -collect cellular waste and pathogens throughout tissues -bring collected antigens back to lymph nodes to show and activate a specific line of defense -engulf bacteria, break down in lysosome and then release them to B and T cells

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neutrophils

engulf and kill pathogen directly

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eosinophils/basophils/mast cells

participate in inflammation and allergic responsees in US

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example of imune response

-cut on finger infected with bacteria -immediate inflammatory response --vasodialation and vascular permeability-brings blood to infection, bring leukocytes to the wound, wound gets swollen and red --cytokine release by leukocytes--cause pain and sensitivity -Macrophages bring antigen to lymph nodes, talk to B cells and T cells -B and T cells become activated and reproduce -B and T cells migrate to the infection site, kill infected cells and secrete antibodies

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phagocytes

macrophages and neutrophils big cell eaters -have receptors on surface to recognize things that are common to pathogens-- bacteria outer cell wall -knows there is a bactera and englufs it, even if there is a variety of bacteria

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lymphoid tissue-- strategic placement

-located around boy to meet the most marcropahes -lymph nodes, appendix and tonsils are meeting places for immune cells -mouth, groin, armpits

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lymphnodes

mouth, groin armpits macrophages and dendritic cells cary their antigens to the lymph nodes, find compatible T and B cells and activate them with cytokines. T and B cells then proliferate and go out to find the infection

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cytokines

ommunicate between cells -all cells secrete them some secreted by non immune cells to signal damage to immue system some are released by immune cells to elicit fever, itching etc to help

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homing

cytokines call to leukocytes to get them to infected tissues

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how do leukocytes get to infected tissue

called by cytokines, bind to endothelial cells that line blood vessels, then squeeze between them to get out of blood vessel to the side of infection

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why are leukocytes in veins not arteries?

lower force, rpessure and speed so their is better interactino between WBC and vessel walls

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inflammattion

-endothelial cells become leky so leukocytes can get to infection, during this plasma gets out of blood vessels which leads to swelling --causes a drop in BP

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what can chronic inflammation do/

lead to cancer do to icreased mitosis

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antibodies

made by b cells can: -tag pathogen for destruction -bind to its parts and precent it from working -bind multiple pathogens and keep them from moving

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no helper T cells

HIV-- no coordinatino of immune response. Can be devestating

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T and B cell education

develped during fetal development,

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Primary T and B cell response

will test to see if they react with any of the pathogens antigens-- if they are they multiply and kill off, as the infection dies the numbers decline, but some circulate in blood for years

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Secondary "memory" response

if an infection occurs with the same pathogen the antigen specific T/B cells reproduce at the infection site, there is no innate cell recruitment in lymph nodes the infections resolce quickly, and are typically not symptomatic

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when do leukocytes exit the blood stream?

in response to cytokines

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what is an antigen?

a piece of a pathogen- that our immune system can recognize

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active immunity

your immune system produces a response

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passive imunity

someone elese immune system produces a respons anti venom transfer of antibodies from mom to fetus in pregnancy or through breast milk

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vaccination

injected with the antigen of a specifinc pathogen includes chemicals that elicit an immune response this is your primary response, so the next time when you actualy see the pathogen you will have a secondary response--- no symptoms! can bypass dengeroud primary resoonse -99% elimation of small poz, diptheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio, measles, mumps, rubella --NOT LINKED TO AUTISM -mercury preservative is no longer in vaccines

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Flu vaccine

mutates every year infections nov-april is an educated guess as to which strains to include

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developing a strong immune system

requires exposure to antigens/pathogens regular activity promotes reactivity to pathogens and tolerance to non-pathogens -overly sterile environments may contribute to allergies and asthma

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opportunistic infections

-when immune system is supplressed, bacteria that we normally live with seize the opportunity to infect us -can be suppressed by fatigue, stress, drugs, infections AIDS is a syndrome of pathofens we normally fight off

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autoimmune disease

mistakes -self reactive cells survived immune cells react against a self protein

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immuno diffeciency

SCID: infants die before age 1 AIDS: patients can't fight opportunistic infections

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cardiovascular system

heart, blood, vessels. function is to transport oxygen,glucose, nutrients, hormones, waste and other chemicals throughout the body

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bulk flow

since all parts of the blood are equally subject to the pessure gradient, they all move togehter (lliquids and solids)

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Pressure graduents

blood will only move through the cardiovascular system if a pressure gradient is established

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systemic circulation

travels from heart all over the body and back (except lungs)

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pulmonary circualtion

travels from heart to lungs and back to heart

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the heart anatomy

4 chambers: top 2: atria--- recieve blood from vessels bottom 2: ventricles: pump blood out of the heart Right: receives deoxygenated blood (70%O2) from body and pumps it to lungs Left: receives oxygenated blood from lungs (97% O2) and pumps it to the body

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deoxygenated blood

70%O2

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oxygenated blood

97% o2

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right atrium

recieves deoxygenated blood from the vena cava

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righ ventricle

receives deoxygenated blood from the right atrium via tricuspid(AV) valve

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left atriumr

receives oxygenated blood from the pulmonary veins

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left ventricle

receives oxxygenated blood and pumps it into the aorta

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AV valves

between the atria and ventricles

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Semilunar valves

are in the arteries leaving the heart (the aortic valve and pulmonary valve)

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aorta

artery that pumps oxygenated blood from the left ventricle to the body

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vena cava

veins taht return deoxygenated blood from the body to the heart (the right atrium)

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coronary circulation

the circulation of blood in the blood vessels of the heart muscle

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pulmonary artery

carries deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs (the only artery that caries deoxygenated blood)

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pulmonary vein

carry oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart

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hydrostatic pressure

the force exerted by the fluid on its container

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resistance

how difficult it is for the fluid to flow through a container (walls offer resistance, so you have to force to overcome resistance

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flow=

change in pressure/resistance

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when will flow increase?

if pressure increases and the pressure can over come resistance.

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What happens if resistance increases

there will be a decrease in pressure and decrease in flow until you overcome resistance

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factors that effect flow: distance

flow and pressyre decrease over distance because energy is lost due to friction

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factors that effect flow: viscoscity

thicker fluids do not flow as well and require more pressure to move them

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factors that effect flow: diameter of tube

larger diameter means that you need less pressure to create flow, smaller diameter more force required

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what happens to resistance if you increase diameter

decrease in resistance

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what happens to resistance if you increase length

increase resistance-- requires more pressure to get through

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what happens to resistance if increase viscocity

increase resistance, requires more pressure to get through

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which organs need the most blood flow?

abdominal organs, kidneys, skeletal mustle, brain

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atrial contractions

move blood to ventricles (can be done mostly by gravity)

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ventriculat contractions

move blood to lungs and body (up and out of heart) needs strong contracion

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Path of blood through system

1. systemic veins (deoxygenated) 2. Vena cava ( 3. right atrium 4. throughright AV valve 5. reight ventricle 6. through semilunar valve 7. pulmonary trunk-pulmonary arteries GAS EXCHANGE IN LUNGS 8. pulmonary veins (oxygenated) 9.left atrium 10. left AV valve 11. left ventricle 12. aortic semilunar valve 13. aorta 14. systemic arteries 15. systemic veins back to begining`

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valves

increased pressure during contraction closes the valve to prevent back flow low pressure between contractinos allows valves to open

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If you have 2 hoses, one long one short with ater starting at the same pressure, will the water exit at the same pressure?

no, the shorter one wil have a greater pressure

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if you are stressed and have vadoconstriction, is there more blood or less blood being delivered to the heart?

less blood to the heart.

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you have stiffening of the right AV valve, which location would see less blood flow?

the lungs,

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nodal cells and conducting fiber

parts of heart that conreol electrical impulses. pacemaker cells to make the heart beat

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ventricular muscle contraction must be

rapid have long absolute refractory period have a short relative refractory period to be ready for the next impulse must relax and fill with blood before contracting again

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ventriculat muscle cells at rest

leaky k chanels-- so mostly hyperpolarized closed voltage gated Na+ channels closed coltage gated Ca ++

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ventricular muscle cell depolarization

Na enters, ca enters (later than Na + but for longer-- results in long absolute refractory period) K exits-- to create the short relative refractory period

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atrial cell depolarization

same as ventricular, but plateu is shorter less importance on atrial contraction because it can be accomplished by gravity

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nodal cells must

spontaneously depolarize (pacemaker) rapid have a long absolute refractory period have a short relative refractory period to be ready for the next impulse

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nodal cell depolarization

spontaneously depolarize by leaking ions, a few Na and Ca channels are open when voltage is ngrative below threshold, more Ca that open at threshold. (Steadyly depolarizes to threshold, then throws open the gates) don't depolarize to 30, stop at zero ad then can repolarize much faster

184

SA Node

pacemaker-- started the spontaneous depolarization of the heart spreads through walls of atrica, then hits AV node and spreads to ventrivles

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p wave

depolarization of the atria

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QRS

ddepolarization of the ventricles

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t

repolarization of the ventricles

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systole

contraction (blood is ejected)

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diastole

relaxation (blood fills)

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atril systole

atria contract- push blood down into ventricles this is the P wave

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isovolumetric ventricular contraction

aka early ventricular contraction same volume, don't eject blood, just squeeze it to snap AV valves closed begin to see QRS here this is the "lub" sound

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ventricular ejection

aka late ventricular systole blood flows out of the ventricle into the pulmoary trunk or aorta opens up semilunar valve This is the highest portion of theQRS complex as ventricles relax it leads to the the snapping shut of the Semilunar valve makingthe dub sound

193

stroke volume

the amount of blood ejectedf rom one ventricle during systole (around 70ml)

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end diastolic volume

volume of blood in the ventricle at the end of diastole (around 100-135ml)

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end sytolic voluem

volume in ventricle at the end of systole

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ejection fraction

the percent of the EDV that gets out

197

stroke volume=

EDV-ESV

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what is the purpose of early ventricular systole?

close the AV valves

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what is happening between the P wave and QRS complex?

blood is flowing between atria and ventricles

200

what is the depolarizing ion for nodal cells?

Na and Ca

201

ejection fraction=

SV/EDV usually around 50-75%

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end diastolic volume

full ventricle

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after systolve volume in aorta is

stroke volume

204

after systole the volume left in the ventricle is the

end systolic volume

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ejection fraction

difference between original amount in ventricle and the amount in aota after systole

206

as blood vessels narrow, what happens to flow?

decreases

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if flow goes down what happens to the ejection fraction?

decreases

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frank starling laq

saromeres are able to contract more when stretched to a degree, then stretch inhibits sarcomere contraction in heart- ring of connective tissue that encircles the heard and prevents overfilling an increase in venous return, means an increase in stretch on muscle walls, so an increased amount of contraction possible-- increases possible EJF

209

Cardiac output=

HR*SV during exercise CO can increse to 30-35L/min how much blood is leaving your heart in a minute

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portal system

two capillary beds in series, link one organ to another without returning blood to the heart

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hepatic portal vein

delivers nutrients to the liver from intestines, low o2

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hypothalamus-pituitary portal system

brings tropic hormones from hypothalamus to pituitary

213

kidneys

portal system deliver plasma to be filtered for urination, connects arterial capillary to arterial capillary

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angiogenesis

the growth of new blood vessels

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when does angiogenesis happen?

in babies and children, after menstruation, in wound healing, in cancerous tumor development

216

blood pressure

generated by ventricular systole flow is proportional to change in P and inversely proportional to 1/R bigger

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the ventricle needs to generate enough pressure to overcome...

-length of tubes leading back to the heart -decreasing diameter of those tubes -relative viscocity of blood

218

hypotension

abnormally low BP not enough force to overcome resistance, blood doesnt make it back to the heart (or brain) so dizziness ot fainting will occur bad short term

219

orthostatic hypotension

hypotension when changing position. Blood pools in lower extremities, more common in elderly

220

hypertesion

abnormally high BP puts stress on vessel walls fine short term-- bad long term

221

systolic blood pressyre

during contraction -120

222

diastolic BP

during relaxation ~80

223

is there a difference between diastolic and systolic in the veins?

no, we lose that pressure as you get away from the heart

224

prehypertensve

120/80-139/89

225

hypertensive

140/90

226

pressure in pulmonary system

15/5 low pressure.. distance from heart to lung doesn't need a lot of pressure

227

pressure i right atrium/vena cava

0 pressure, which encourages blood to return there

228

blood pressure in veins

low pressure, uses skeletal muscle pump and pulmonary pump also has vavles to prevent backflow

229

skeletal muscle pumps

sandwich veins between skeletal muscles so contraction of muscle will squeeze blood up

230

pulmonary pump

as you breathe in, your thoracic cage expands and diaphragm lowers towards abdomen this creastes a low pressure environment in the thorax this decreases the pressure in the inferior vena cava drawing venous blood up toward the heart

231

pulse pressure

systolc-diastolic

232

pulse

when the high pressure blood meets the low pressure blood, displacing it

233

mean arterial pressure

average blood pressure in the vessels over time diastole lastes longer than systole so mean pressure is closer to diastolic

234

mean arterial pressure=

HR*SV*TPR TPR=total periperal resistance

235

if you are feeling anxious and HR increases what happens to your MAP?

increases

236

you are under chronic stree and cortisol levels increase, what happens to MAP?

increases, would lead to vaso constriction, so more resistancce

237

you are stabbed and have lost a liter of blood, what happens to MAP?

decrease

238

what causes hypertension

increased peripheral resistance w/o change in cardiac output. Over time the vessels lose their elasticity idopathic can be caused by genetics, smoking and lack of cardiovascular exercisee

239

How can we change MAP?

total blood volune distribution of blood in circulation -- moving food to stomach for digestion etx

240

if you want to change the rate of blood flow...

1. change resisitance or change pressure

241

how can we change resistance

-vasoconstriction of dialation partition of blood flow-- selectively change diameter to direct blood where you want it to go

242

capillart structure

one cell walls (endothelial cells)

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capillary exchange

-diffusion of small molecules accross capillary endothelium -bulk flow of liquid00 plasma leaves the capillary and enters the extracellular fluid, this will help to maintain fluid and pressure on both sides -movement of fluid out of the capillary is usually greater than into the capillary -lose about 3L/day

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plasma and extracellular fluid volumes

on average we have 3L of plasma and 11L of extracellular fluid

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Dehydration

liquid from extracellular fluid into plasma to maintain blood volume

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excess blood volume

more liquid into extracellular fluid

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Starling forces

the ways that movement out of the capillaries is regulated -hydrostatic pressure -osmotic pressure

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hydrostatic pressure--

greater pressure inseide the capillary than outside (P2-P1=deltaP), forces fluids out

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osmotic pressure

there is a greater solute concentration in one place than another, which draws water into or out of the capillary (usually into)

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how do we replace plasma water

lymphatic system drains tissues of excess water and then through capillary exchange replaces is in the capillaries

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edema

swelling

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edema causes

-lymph can't drain properly (usually a blockage), can be cancer, parasite, surgery -capillary outflow greatly exceeds inflow from lymph. This can happen from an increase in hydrostatic pressure from cardia failure or a decrease in plasma protein production

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how can you change blood flow?

-change resistance -change pressure-- (change volume or heart rate)

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hyperemia

an increase in blood flow accompanies an increase in metabolic activity

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active hyperemia

exercise. muscles increase their metabolism and therefore their need for O2, blood flow to the miscles increases to meet the demand

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reactive hyperemia

temporary-- like foots asleep tissue uses its O2 stores and needs to replenish when flow is re established

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what happens if blood volume changes?

blood pressure changes too, ex. increase in volume leads to increase of pressure ALWAYS, at least temporarily

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dehydration

ex. the kidneys should compensate for changes in the diet or fluid intake but they cannot replace lost fluid, so a severe decrease in hydratoin will cause a decrease in blood volume.

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vetricular performance

ventricles must have the same stroke volume

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homeosatic control of MAP

MAP=SV*HR*TPR

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heartrate control

-autorhythmicity-intrinsic sympathetic and parasympathetic innervation-- from brain -hormones (epinepherine and norepinepherine increase, thyroid) -heat

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Stroke Volume

frank starling-- if venous return is high, frankstaarling increase sympathetic innervation/epinepherine hormone (amount of contractions in heart muscles) -afterload (pressure in aorta to overcome) (Decreases SV)

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Total periferal resistance control

myogenic mechanism-- arteriold controls its own diameter by responding to stretch or pressure exerted on the walls of the vessel (Response to stretch is to constrict-- happens to protect capillaries ahead by decreasing flow. chemical mechanism-- alters diameter of arteriole- vasodialators and vasocontrictors -- ONLY sympathetic fibers that innervate the blood vessels

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myogenic response

arteriold controls its own diameter by responding to stretch or pressure exerted on the walls of the vessel (Response to stretch is to constrict-- happens to protect capillaries ahead by decreasing flow.

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sympathetic tone

constantly maintained via signals from the brain. signal frequency increases or decreases to constrict or dialate the blood vessel

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how is blood pressure monitored?

baro receptors in aorta and carotid artery

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hypertension causes

90% idiopathic 10% secondary to a known disease, such as endocrine or renal disorders

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hypertension

with chronic hypertension the baroreceptors become insensitive and fail to react to an increase in pressure -puts strain on heart, left ventricle has to work harder to overcome pressure gradient-- left ventricle hypertrophy -cardiac failure

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will contracting your calf muschles increase MAP?

yes

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atherosclerosis

minor damage fro vesselwall patch with cholesterol until healed-- too much can cause a build up overtime

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aneurysm and stroke

narrowing o arteries cause blood build upp, the vessel can stroke resulting in a stroke

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exercise and cardiovascular health

-increase diameter of vessels -increase elasticity of arteries -increase glycogen storage in cardiomyocytes -decreased risk for hypertension, atherosclerosis, heart attack, aneurism and stroke

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entero-

pertaining to the GI tract

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hydrolysis reactions

can depolyermize carbs and proteins sped up/ made possible by enzymes

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will lipids be digested by water?

no hydrophobic

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peristalisis

involuntary wavs of contraction and relaxation of smooth muscles in the organ walls through GI tract, move food

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segmentation

contractions in the SI, segmental rings of contraction chop and mix the ingested food. slows down movement.

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transport phases in digestion

-into intestinal epithelial cell -into interstitial fluid (and blood) from itestinal epithelial --- almost always active

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carbohydrates in diet

-1/2 of diet, mostly as large polysaccharides (starches) disaccharides (sugars) and rarely monosaccharides

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lactose

glucose + galactose

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how do we join monomers?

dehydration reaction, releases water bonds the monomers

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sucrose

glucose+ fructose

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maltose

glucose+glucose

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fiber

cellulose and other complex plant polysaccharides can't break them down partially metabolized by gut bacteria forms majority of feces

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Carb digestion

begins in mouth-salivary amylase SI- pancreatic amylase -specific enzymes are required for some dissachharides, ex lactose, which are made by the intestinal epithelial cells makes monomers glucose, galactose and fructose which are then transported

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Carb transport

glucose and fructose -some by primary active transport by glucose transporter proteins glucose and galactose undergo secondary active transport using Na graients SGLT then moves out of intestinal epithelial cell into interstitial fluid by facillitated diffusion

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how is fructose transported?

GLUT secondary transport

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how is glucose transported into intestinal epithelial cell??

GLUT and SGLT (na gradients)

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how is galactose transported into intestinal epithelial cell???

SGLT Na gradient secondary active transport

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how does carbs move out of the intestinal epithelial into intersticial fluid?

facillitated diffusion

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carb ansorption

absorbed quickly broken down easily hydrophillic-- travels in blood easily stored well in glycogen are the beggining reactant for cellular respiration

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protein in diet

americans eat 2x's more than we need 15% of calories rarely used for energy, just for building new proteins we add dietary proteins in the digestion process as in mucus and enzymes

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how do we make proteins?>

AA come togeher via peptide bonds (using dehydration)

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protein digestion

broken down in stomach and SI broken down by enzymes Stomach: pepsin (Released as inert precursor as pepsinogen, which is activated in low pH encironment) small protein fragments moce on to small intestine in small intestine, further breakdown by trypsin and chymotrypsin into individual AA or small chains

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protein absorption

moved into intestinal epithelial by secondary active transport using H+ and Na+ gradients Some intact proteins can be moced through the intestinal epithelial by endocytosis and exocytosis

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fat digestion

accomplished by lipase (some salivary, mostly pancreatic) which breaks fat down into a monoglyceride and 2 fatty acids fat molecules are hydrophobic and aggregate into fat globules-- need bile to emulsify

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bile salts

act as emulsifiers =, amking sure that monomers don't re-aggregate back into alrge droplets. Big droplets are broken into small droplets called micelles, that further break down into monomers

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where are bile slats made?

liver

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colipase

a molecule that helps lipase adhere to the surface of the globules, is secreted with lipases

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fat absorption

fatty acids and monoglycerides diffuse into the intestinal epithelial cells down the concentration gradient once inside the cell they are reassembled into triglycerides and are then exported out of the cell by exocytosis then travel into small lymph vessels called lacteals, into lymphatic circulation and then they are later dumped into the blood

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why is fat allowed to reaggregate into micelles?

so that the transport of fat soluble vitamins is guaranteed

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why does fat travel in lumph

capillary cells are too tightly adhered to each other and won't allow fat dropets in -lymph vessels are overlapping flaps, they are not adhered and larger items can pass in

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what is in each villus?

- an artery bringing oxygenated blood to the cells - a vein which drains to the hepatic portal vein-- carbs and proteins are absorbed here -a lacteal-- specialized lymphatic vessel that absorbs fats-- contents are drained directly into venous circulation

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lacteal

a specialized lymphatic vessel that absorbs fat, and is later drained directly into venous circulation (bypasses liver)

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malabsorption

any interference of any nutrient-- can lead to nutrient deficiencies

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vitamin absorption

-fat soluble vitamins are absorbed in droplets with fatty acids and triglycerides -water soluble vitamines are absorbed by diffusion or mediated transport ***except B12-- must be absorbed by a transport molecule called intrinsic factor

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how much water must be reabsorbed each day?

8L

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What % of water is absorbed by SI? LI?

SI- 80% LI-20%

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how is water transported?

passive transport through aquaporins

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what ion gradients are used to transport water?

Na- establised using the Na/K pump -Cl and HCO3 can be contransported with Na to create further osmotic preessure

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Neural regulation of GI processes

has its own enteric nervous system -sensory stimuli-- stretch in gut wall, chyme properties (pH, osmolarity etx) -are enteric sensory mechanoreceptors and chemoreceptors on the walls of the gut -motor output --can increase or decrease peristalsis or segmentation --contract around glands to influence secretion

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Ascending tracts

neural regulation of GI Enterin NS communicates with brain to elicit behavior changes such as huunger, thirst

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descending tracts

neural reg. of GI -sight, smell or thought of food can change secretion and movement within the GI tract

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hormonal regulation of GI

-are receptors on enteroendocring cells that can trigger internal signalling the results in hormonal release -hormones are released through the non-lumenal side and absorbed into the blood

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Gastron

-made in stomach -triggered by protein in stomach -stimulates acid secreting and SI and LI motility

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CCK

-made in SI -triggered by proteins and fat in SI -stimulates bile release, inhibits gastric emptying

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Secretin

made in SI -trigggered by acid in SI -inhibits acid and motility in stomach, stimulates HCO3, releases into small intestine

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GIP

-made in SI -triggered by carb or fat in SI -triggers release of pancreatic enzymes.

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what are the phases named for?

the location of the stimuli

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cephalic phase

stimuli from head--sight smell, taste, chewing -parasympathetic fibers trigger neurons in enteric nervous system to initiate secretion, motility etc

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gastric phase

stimuli from stomach (Stretching of wall, acidity amino acids or peptides in stomach) -enteric nervous system responds with changes in motility and secretion -gastrin is a component of gastric phase regulation

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intestinal phase

stimuli from small intestine (Stretching of wall, acidity, osmolarity,) -enterin nervous system responds with changes in motility and secretion -secretin, CCK and GIP are componentes of this phase

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mouth

-mechanical and chemical digestion -contains salivary amylase -

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uses of saliva

-salivary amylase -solvent that allows taste buds to be stimulated -lubrication for food -bicarb to precent cavities and keep the mouth clean (keeps pH high) -kick starts digestion -has antibacterial properties and wound healing enzymes (histatins)

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esophagus

transport tube down to stomach -bordered by sphincters -peristalsis

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sphincters

rings of muscle that form one way valves -skeletal or smooth muscle -almost always contracted, relaxation opens and allows passage

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Functions of stomach

-chemical digestion -mechanical digestion -protection from chemicals

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pepsinogen

made in stomach an enzyme precursor that is converted to pepsin-- an enzyme that digests proteins

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HCl

released in stomach breaks H bonds mkes 2L a day

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intrinsic factor

made by stomach binds B12 to allow it to be absorbed in SI

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Gastrin

made in stomach hormone that stimulates the acid secretion and gastric motility

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mucus

made in stomach basic and protective

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mucus cells

secrete mucus

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parietal cells

secrete Hcl and intrinsic factor

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cheif cels

secrete pepsinogen

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enteroendocrine cell

secretes gastrin

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How is the stomach protected by itself?

-enzymes are released in inactive forms and then converted to active forms -acidic interior is seperated from cells by thick basic mucous cells -is bordered at the top and bottom by sphincters

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Wat are the jobs of the SI?

continue digestion protect itself from chyme (acidic) -accomplish majority of absorption

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Small intestine digestion

bile salts contributed by liver/gall bladder Pancreatic enzymes from pancreas

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Trypsin

A pancreatic enzyme Breaks peptide bonds into amino acids

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lipase

pancreatic enzyme breaks down triglycerides into individual fatty acids

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amylase

pancreatic enzyme splits polysaccharides

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ribo and deoxyribonuclease

pancreatic enzyme breaks down DNA and RNA

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What are the pancreatic enzymes?

trypsin, lipase, amylase and Ribo and deoxyribonuclease

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Small intestine protection

HCO3 is a secretion by the pancrease into the SI

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Nodal Cell depolarization

A image thumb
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vetricular cell depolarization

A image thumb