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Med Surge 4th exam > fluid and electrolytes > Flashcards

Flashcards in fluid and electrolytes Deck (135)
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1

What is the name of the fluid found within the cells that constitutes 2/3 of total body fluid:

intracellular fluid

2

What is the fluid found outside of the cells that contains about 1/3 of the body's total body fluid:

extracellular fluid

3

What are the three major compartments of the ECF:

interstitial, intravascular (plasma), transcellular fluid

4

What is the fluid found within the vascular system:

intravascular or plasma

5

What is the fluid that surrounds the cells:

interstitial fluid

6

What is the fluid that makes up the cerebrospinal, biliary, synovial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities:

transcellular fluid

7

Which of the fluids is vital for cell functioning and contains solutes: oxygen, electrolytes, and glucose which provide a medium for metabolic processes of the cell:

intracellular

8

Which of the fluids is the transport system that carries O2 and nutrients to and waste products from the cells:

extracellular fluid

9

What are some examples of cations:

Na, K, Ca, Mg

10

What are some examples of anions:

Cl, bicarbonate HCO3, phosphate, and sulfate

11

What are the principle electrolytes of the ECF:

Na, Cl, bicarbonate

12

What are the primary electrolytes of ICF:

K, Mg, phosphate, and sulfate

13

A major concern in the loss of fluids and electrolytes can occur by what causes:

vomiting, diarrhea, gastric suction

14

Cell membranes are permeable to what:

H2O and selectively permeable to solutes

15

Substances that dissolve in a liquid is defined as:

solutes

16

Large protein molecules that do not readily dissolve into solutions are defined as:

colloids (albumin)

17

The component of a solution that can dissolve a solute is defined as:

solvent

18

The CONCENTRATION of solutes in body fluids determined by the number of dissolved solutes per kg of water is defined as:

osmolality (mOsm/kg)

19

What is the primary determinant of osmolality (mOsm/kg) of plasma:

Na

20

What is the determinant of osmolality of ICF:

K, glucose, urea

21

What is the normal plasma osmolality:

280-295 mOsm/kg

22

A plasma osmolality that's >295 means that the concentration is...

too great/water content too small

23

A plasma osmolality that's <280 means that the concentration is...

too small/water content is too high

24

Isotonic, hypertonic, and hypotonic that's used to refer to the osmolality in a solution is defined as:

tonicity

25

A solution that has the same osmolality as the ECF is defined as and what is an example:

isotonic; 0.9%NS/LR/D5W

26

A solution that has a higher osmolality than the ECF is defined as and an example is:

hypertonic; 3% NS/D5 1/2 NS/D5NS/D5LR

27

A solution that is less osmolality than the ECF is defined as and an example is:

hypotonic; 0.45% NS/0.33% NS/2.5 D5W

28

The power of a solution to pull water across a semipermeable membrane is defined as:

osmotic pressure

29

If I were to infuse a hypertonic solution (3% NS), what will happen to the RBCs:

Plasma will have higher concentration than the cells and will pull water from the cells-->cells will shrink

30

If I were to infuse a hypotonic solution (0.49 NS) into the plasma, what will happen to the RBCs:

Plasma will have less concentration causing the RBCs to pull in water from the plasma=RBCs will swell