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Flashcards in Mary Rowlandson Deck (44):
1

Rowlandson: full title

A Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson

2

Rowlandson: born

1636

3

Rowlandson: dies

1711

4

Rowlandson: written

1682

5

Rowlandson: centres

Text of Bible

6

Rowlandson: trauma

redemption and restoration

7

Rowlandson: folklore

local legend

8

Rowlandson: ideology, community, identity

She calls the Indian attack a "raid" but never refers to a "war." Shaping white identity with the Indian Other

9

Rowlandson: commerce

She eventually begins to participate in the econ: knits, etc.

10

Rowlandson: captivity narrative, development

Hers is chief; spiritual—they grow more secular and pulpy as frontier expands and movement is less Puritan

11

Rowlandson: other genre terms?

- Heroism, high adventure
- Biblical narrative (myth?)
- Sermon
- Spiritual autobiography

12

Rowlandson: tone

Pious; humble; longsuffering, faithful

13

Rowlandson: style

Plain, with devotional passion

14

Rowlandson: her daughter

dies

15

Rowlandson: she is separated from

her son

16

Rowlandson: signs of God's wrath

against the Indians: constant starvation. Against the colonists: Indians

17

Rowlandson: survival versus escape

Survival permissible since it allows for continued chastisement from God; but she doesn't attempt to escape because that would also resist God's plan to chastise and humble and teach her.

18

Rowlandson: signs

When would-be escapees (who tried to convince her to escape with them) are caught and brutally murdered, she sees this as evidence she’s done right.

19

Rowlandson: she obtains a

Bible. This is crucial.

20

Rowlandson: thriving in captivity?

Becomes thriving under God's tutelage. There are moments in which she seems to thrive—food has never tasted so good (as when she eats after starving)—signs of God’s instruction taking effect

21

Rowlandson: wilderness

Biblical topos; a place of wandering, suffering, learning, punishment. Also a place where one is subjected to the devil.

22

Rowlandson: her husband is

minister of the town of Lancaster

23

Rowlandson: formal features

Divided into "removes" (there are many)

24

Rowlandson: how it's received

One of the most popular prose works of the 17th c. here and in England—first “best seller” in American history

25

Rowlandson: published with

a sermon of her husband's

26

Rowlandson: as author

this is her first book; she's not an author; not just trying to get attention or money.

27

Rowlandson: born where?

In England, probably brought to colonies at a young age.

28

Rowlandson: her father was a

wealthy landholder in Massachusetts Bay Colony

29

Rowlandson: the raid happens

February 1676

30

Rowlandson: she is ransomed in

May 1676

31

Rowlandson: she is ransomed for

20 pounds

32

Rowlandson: King Philip's real name is

Metacomet

33

Rowlandson: "King Philip's War" started because

colonists want to buy Wampanoag land; they don't comply; Plymouth Colony captures Wampanoag chief in 1664; he dies in captivity; Metacomet becomes chief.

34

Rowlandson: Metacomet agrees to Plymouth C's demands to purchase land, but colonists keep

encroaching

35

Rowlandson: in 1671 colonists demand Metacomet

answer for his "aggression," though it's their fault

36

Rowlandson: "King Philip's War" officially declared in

1675

37

Rowlandson: colonial alliance

All colonies unite in King Philip's War

38

Rowlandson: King Philip's War lasts

3 years

39

Rowlandson: how many colonists die in KPW? Indians?

600; 3,000

40

Rowlandson: influences what fiction

Cooper's The Last of the Mohicans; Faulkner's Sanctuary

41

Rowlandson: "Wait on the Lord, be..."

"of good courage, and He shall strengthen thee."

42

Rowlandson: an important concept to Puritans generally is "merciful..."

"affliction"

43

Rowlandson: the Nancy thesis

she is reconciling her subjectivity to God to her subjectivity to the Indians, negotiating a narrative to reconcile these two.

44

Rowlandson: what two things does R take control of by writing this?

1. people's understanding of the facts of her captivity (e.g. that the Indians didn't lay a hand on her physically). 2. interpretation of the event (God working in her life as opposed to her downfall signaling her own wickedness)