Module1-3 Flashcards Preview

Pharm > Module1-3 > Flashcards

Flashcards in Module1-3 Deck (14):
1

controlled Substances Schedule C-I

High abuse potential
No medical use
Dependency Potential: Severe physical and psychologic

2

controlled Substances Schedule C-II

High abuse potential
Medical use accepted
Dependency Potential: Severe physical and psychologic

3

controlled Substances Schedule C-III

abuse potential less than C-II
Medical use accepted
Dependency Potential: Moderate to low physical or high psychologic

4

controlled Substances Schedule C-IV

abuse potential less than C-III
Medical use accepted
Dependency Potential: limited physical or psychological

5

controlled Substances Schedule C-V

abuse potential less than C-IV
Medical use accepted
Dependency Potential: limited physical or psychological

6

Preventing Medication Errors-44 to 98 thousand deaths per year in U.S.

Minimize verbal or telephone orders
 Repeat order to prescriber
 Spell drug name aloud
 Speak slowly and clearly
 List indication next to each order
 Avoid medical shorthand, including
abbreviations and acronyms

7

Preventing Medication Errors (cont’d)

Never assume anything about items not
specified in a drug order (i.e., route)
 Do not hesitate to question a medication
order for any reason when in doubt
 Do not try to decipher illegibly written orders; contact prescriber for clarification

8

Preventing Medication Errors (cont’d)

NEVER use “trailing zeros” with medication
orders
Do not use 1.0 mg; use 1 mg
 1.0 mg could be misread as 10 mg, resulting in a tenfold dose increase

9

Preventing Medication Errors (cont’d

ALWAYS use a “leading zero” for decimal
dosages
Do not use .25 mg; use 0.25 mg
.25 mg may be misread as 25 mg

10

Preventing Medication Errors (cont’d

Always listen to and honor any concerns
expressed by patients regarding medications
Check patient allergies and identification

11

Use of OTCs/Herbal Products

May postpone effective treatment of more
chronic disease states
May delay treatment of serious and/or lifethreatening disorders
May relieve symptoms of a disorder but not
the cause

12

Herbal Products

Dietary Supplement and Health Education Act
(DSHEA) of 1994
Herbal products are considered “dietary
supplements”
 No proof of efficacy or safety required
 No standards for quality control
 May claim effect but cannot promise a specific cure

13

Herbal Products (cont’d)

Dietary Supplement and Health Education Act (DSHEA) of 1994 (cont'd)
Supplement manufacturer does not have to
provide the FDA with evidence on which it relies to substantiate the safety or effectiveness of a product before or after it markets the product
Other countries (UK, Canada, France, Germany) require manufacturers to meet quality and safety
standards

14

Commonly Used
Herbal Products

Aloe - wound healing, inflammation
Feverfew - migraines
Ginkgo- memory, alzheimers
Echinacea- colds, stimulate immune system
Garlic- atherosclorosis, lower cholesterol
Ginseng- energy stimulant
Goldenseal-colds, flu, dermal fungal infection
St. John’s wort- depression
Valerian-sedative, sleep problems
Kava- relax, decrease anxiety, Hepatotoxic
Hawthorn- heart failure
Saw palmetto- for benign prostate hyperplasia
Melatonin- help sleep