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Flashcards in NeuroOncology - Bemis Deck (20):
1

What do you call a treatment that follows the primary treatment?

Called adjuvant

(With tumors, adjuvant therapy goal is to remove any residual cancer cells)

2

Rosenthal fibers and a biphasic pathology pattern are particularly associated with what kind of tumors?

Pretty benign Pilocytic Astrocytoma

3

What is GFAP?
What does it show?

GFAP = glial fibrillary acidic protein

Indicator of astrocyte injury

4

What is a key feature of a primary glioblastoma?

pseudo-palisading necrosis

5

Feature of butterfly gliomas?

they cross the midline (via corpus callosum?)

6

What is the i(17q) mutation associated with?

poor prognosis in medulloblastoma

(short arm of chromosom 17 is completely gone and replaced with another long arm)

7

Where do you see medulloblastomas?

In children, usually cerebellum

8

What symptoms do you see with medulloblastoma?

Headache, morning vomiting gets worse with time, problems with back pain and motion

9

About 70% of brain tumors are metastatic from other sites. How can you tell the different between a primary brain tumor and a metastasis to the brain?

Primary Brain Tumors:
-poorly circumscribed
-Usually single
-Location varies

Metastasis to brain:
-well circumscribed
-often multiple
-Usually located in gray/white matter junction

10

What is the difference between adults and children as far as the general location of CNS tumors?

Children - 70% of tumors are in the posterior fossa

Adults - 70% of tumors are located in the supratentorial

11

Describe the general rules for tumor grading in the CNS:

Grade 1: Low prolif potential - just cut it out!
Grade 2: Infiltrative, but low proliferative activity
Grade 3: See more mitosis
Grade 4: Fast progression, active mitosis, necrosis prone

12

Why are high grade gliomas so hard to treat?

Infiltrative borders make them hard to completely excise

13

Possible symptoms of glioblastoma?

-Slowly progressing neuro deficit (like motor weakness)
-Headache
-Seizures

14

What are the classic features of oligodendrogliomas?

Sharply circumscribed masses
Round nuclei with cytoplasm halo (fried egg)
Calcified

15

As you are looking at a pathology slide from a brain neoplasm, you see pseudorosettes and rosettes. Immediately you think:

Must be an ependyoma!

16

The next path slides you look at reveal Homer-Wright Rosettes... What kind of neoplasm are you thinking of now???

Medulloblastoma

17

You diagnose a patient with a fairly common benign tumor of arachnoid cells.
What is this neoplasm callded?
What would you see in pathology slides?

Meningioma

You would see a synctial pattern (look like little whirlpools of tissue)
Psammoma bodies (Ca deposits)

18

What is the most likely time you will see a primary brain lymphoma? (because they are rare)

How do you diagnose it?

In an immuosuppressed patient

Very simple diagnosis in CSF

19

Relatively common brain tumor that is found often at CN 7. Often get hearing loss and tinnitis.
Name that tumor!

Schwannoma

20

What is a craniopharyngioma?

-Derived from odotogenic epithelium (tooth dev.)
-Benign
-Usually in kids/young adults
-often have vision problems